Requested salary requirements, have a question.

I had an interview last week for a position, and I just got an email this morning requesting my salary history, and salary requirements for this position.

I've never given a salary history before, I looked at couple of temples online here and here. Is something like that ok?

The salary requirement is harder. The range is $23-$36/hr, and honestly I would take it even at the minimum, because it would still be a pay increase, and the benefits are better. I also don't want to ask for too much, and not get the position. Any thoughts?

Also, since I got this email, I'm feeling pretty confident about getting it. Do you think that it was sent out to others as well?

As always, thanks for any advice, you guys are great.

Comments

  • thenjdukethenjduke Posts: 894Member ■■■■□□□□□□
    Those templates are good. I would put a range for the salary you make. I do not like to give away my exact salary. They can find that out through background check or reference check.
    CCNA, MCP, MCSA, MCSE, MCDST, MCITP Enterprise Administrator, Working towards Networking BS. CCNP is Next.
  • veritas_libertasveritas_libertas CISSP, GIAC x5, CompTIA x5 Greenville, SC USAPosts: 5,735Member ■■■■■■■■■■
    I would refuse to give the history of my wages, but that is me.
    Currently working on: Linux and Python
  • BokehBokeh Posts: 1,636Member ■■■■■■■□□□
    As someone once posted on here when asked about salary, they replied that their current boss would not appreciate that information being passed along.
  • it_consultantit_consultant Posts: 1,903Member
    I never give a salary requirement or a salary history. The salary history is none of there business and the requirement can be hashed out in negotiations if they really want you. I have had this discussion with HR depts before and they are about 50/50 on my side.

    Generally speaking, with background checks and credit checks, I feel like employers are getting too personal. I will keep the little privacy I get while I still can.
  • [Deleted User][Deleted User] Posts: 0 ■■■■□□□□□□
    Personally, I would go middle of the road on the requirements they've set out. I did disclose my salary history to my current employer and they still gave me a 20k bump in salary when I started. Maybe that was sheer luck. I do however agree with the others above that don't think it's 100% neccesary to disclose your salary history. I just have a hard time dodging questions like that. I probably need to practice my interview techniques a little more. Like that Lowe's commercial where they are rehearsing to try and get the lowest price.
  • Paul BozPaul Boz Posts: 2,621Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    I dislike the concept of asking someone their salary history so I fully expect people to lie in their favor. I've done it before. Screw it, you're not going to low-ball me because my last employer and the one before that did too.
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  • Bl8ckr0uterBl8ckr0uter Posts: 5,031Inactive Imported Users ■■■■■■■■□□
    Paul Boz wrote: »
    I dislike the concept of asking someone their salary history so I fully expect people to lie in their favor. I've done it before. Screw it, you're not going to low-ball me because my last employer and the one before that did too.


    ^^^ This^^^

    When I have asked this question before I always reply with ranges, the upper end of ranges. If I was getting paid 50-55 I might say around 60. It really isn't a fair question to ask IMO. It really shouldn't matter what you were paid before. Have a number in mind that you will not go under.
  • falcon101falcon101 Posts: 51Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    Interesting topic...

    I just applied to a position here in LA and in their Online Resume questionnaire, they made it MANDATORY to select "DESIRED SALARY". It was a drop down in increments of 10K e.g 20k-30K, 30K-40K and so on so forth. Basically the resume would not upload or app will not submit if i bypassed that question.

    I have never been so confused on what to select there thinking that "what would be a good answer???!!!'

    I ended up selecting 20K more than what I am making and felt weird about it.

    I do hate telling my current salary and history. You always think that this gives the employer an upper hand during negotiations.
  • Paul BozPaul Boz Posts: 2,621Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    falcon101 wrote: »

    I do hate telling my current salary and history. You always think that this gives the employer an upper hand during negotiations.

    What's especially dirty about it is when you go through that process, feel uncomfortable about it, then get hired and see your managers openly talking about screwing interview candidates over and claiming success for getting them to cough up their salary info. It just makes you understand that you more than likely got hosed.
    CCNP | CCIP | CCDP | CCNA, CCDA
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  • Bl8ckr0uterBl8ckr0uter Posts: 5,031Inactive Imported Users ■■■■■■■■□□
    Paul Boz wrote: »
    What's especially dirty about it is when you go through that process, feel uncomfortable about it, then get hired and see your managers openly talking about screwing interview candidates over and claiming success for getting them to cough up their salary info. It just makes you understand that you more than likely got hosed.


    That's pretty dirty. But I guess less $$$ to you equals less cost for them. It is a shame really.
  • Paul BozPaul Boz Posts: 2,621Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    That's pretty dirty. But I guess less $$$ to you equals less cost for them. It is a shame really.

    In the end its just business and that's a part of it. There are better ways to be diplomatic about it, but many managers don't care to.
    CCNP | CCIP | CCDP | CCNA, CCDA
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  • thenjdukethenjduke Posts: 894Member ■■■■□□□□□□
    It is ashame that manager do this. This is why when I have set amount in my mind I will not settle. I am worth what I feel I am worth. Trust me stand your ground and you will get it.
    CCNA, MCP, MCSA, MCSE, MCDST, MCITP Enterprise Administrator, Working towards Networking BS. CCNP is Next.
  • -Foxer--Foxer- Posts: 151Member
    Thanks for the good advice.

    I ended up sending both the history and requirement. I'm not sure if I did the right thing or not, but I don't want to hurt my chances of getting this position, and figured that if I refused it they wouldn't like that.

    I guess we'll see what happens.
  • Paul BozPaul Boz Posts: 2,621Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    What did the job posting list as the salary range?
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  • howiehandleshowiehandles Posts: 148Member
    I wouldn't recommend shooting for the low end. If you're willing to accept 23, I'd ask for 28-30, and then expect them to come back at 25/26. Heck, you might get 28-30, you never know. Its just part of the game. When potential employers ask for my salary range or history, I always add a few bucks per hour, or thousands per year. It hasn't bit me in the butt yet. Just part of doing business. In the end you need to ask yourself, how badly do you want the job? If 23 an hour is acceptable, you really can't lose by being on the lower half of that range, especially if you're gonna get a lot out of working for that company. Think of the job as a step up, not the final step.
  • GAngelGAngel Posts: 708Member
    There is no such thing as asking for too much the salary has already been budgeted for that year that's why they give the range. If your qualifications meet the top end of the scale then I ask for top end when I interview because quite frankly i'm worth it and if you're a good worker so are you. Good employees are worth more than a few k in wage difference. If you want to be slick say your last salary was approximately xx amount and you're looking for atleast 15-20% more for the move to make sense financially.
  • DevilWAHDevilWAH Posts: 2,997Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    I often quote it if asked what I actuly take home including over time and bonuses.

    IF they ask what I want, I reply with a question asking what they think I am worth. If its in the right ball park I will agree with the higher end. If its lower than I want I will suggest i was looking for a figure around the low end of what I would actually accept. And if they suggest more then I just agree. :)

    They already know what they are happy to pay, so they might as well tell me stright up and we can go from there.

    I don't think you have to be the one start the negotiation.
    • If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough. Albert Einstein
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  • Chris:/*Chris:/* Posts: 658Member
    One thing I looked at when applying to different contracting firms was the way they pay the their salaries.

    Contracting Company A uses a low $40K with massive benefits and incentive packages that pushes the salary into the six figure mark.

    Contracting Company B uses a higher just under six figure salary mark with minimal incentive packages.

    Company A will reduce attrition because when you go to your next job you can only say you made $40K plus incentives. In addition the company can fluctuate your net income by adjusting the packages down the road.

    Company B will keep the same salary mark for the employee and they may have a higher attrition rate but they will usually have a more loyal employee.

    Back on subject I would not talk about what your past salary figures were, just what you want (shoot high) and then hash out an agreeable sum between all parties involved.

    Cheers
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