Anyone have a problem with recruiters not listening?

Just a wee rant. A recruiter called shortly after emailing me about what was essentially my prior position in DC. I told him repeatedly that this was actually my former position and that I needed to stay in Texas. He just kept repeating that he had an opportunity in Washington DC for me. When I finally convinced him that I wasn't interested, he asked if I had friends who might be. I told him everyone I knew with that skill set (a pretty specific one) already worked at that company.

It's just frustrating. I am pretty clear online where I am willing to move to and people disregard it all the time.

Anyone else?
OK, I confess, I do have one certification. I am an ACIA - Arcsight Certified Integrator/Administrator. But it's awarded for attending the class. Woot. And while it's a fine skill to have, my interests lay elsewhere.
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  • erpadminerpadmin Posts: 4,165Member
    Just a wee rant. A recruiter called shortly after emailing me about what was essentially my prior position in DC. I told him repeatedly that this was actually my former position and that I needed to stay in Texas. He just kept repeating that he had an opportunity in Washington DC for me. When I finally convinced him that I wasn't interested, he asked if I had friends who might be. I told him everyone I knew with that skill set (a pretty specific one) already worked at that company.

    It's just frustrating. I am pretty clear online where I am willing to move to and people disregard it all the time.

    Anyone else?


    LMAO!!!

    This is why I have always found recruiters/headhunters useless (and they're even more useless when you're unemployed).

    Two days ago, I had one call me about a position in MD that basically amounted to a $16K raise. (I'm in NJ). I told him I was not interested in a lateral move. Only way I'd leave is if I had a senior-level/tech-lead/supervisory position, and I can actually wait on that while I'm finishing my degree. I'm not (currently) suffering in my job so I can definitely tough it out. The only thing I worry about is furloughs, but we're not going to know how that's going to be until 02/2011. Maybe then I'll sing a different tone. But even then, I still plan on getting the next job myself...the same as with the other past 4.... :D
  • undomielundomiel Posts: 2,818Member
    It's pretty common. The recruiters stick to their spiels in general and barely even look at your resume beyond how many key words they hit. That's the only explanation I can come up with for why I keep getting calls about bench tech and Dell field tech positions. They still seriously try to convince me too if I answer and tell them that it is a step down.
    Jumping on the IT blogging band wagon -- http://www.jefferyland.com/
  • Bl8ckr0uterBl8ckr0uter Posts: 5,031Inactive Imported Users ■■■■■■■■□□
    Just a wee rant. A recruiter called shortly after emailing me about what was essentially my prior position in DC. I told him repeatedly that this was actually my former position and that I needed to stay in Texas. He just kept repeating that he had an opportunity in Washington DC for me. When I finally convinced him that I wasn't interested, he asked if I had friends who might be. I told him everyone I knew with that skill set (a pretty specific one) already worked at that company.

    It's just frustrating. I am pretty clear online where I am willing to move to and people disregard it all the time.

    Anyone else?

    I actually got called by recruiter earlier today. I have dealt with many recruiters this year. Most of them talk a mile a minute (like they are getting paid by the amount of calls they can squeeze in a day. In some ways they kinda are) . A lot of them act they way you described. I have gotten to the point where I just tell them send me an email and I will get back to them. It is usually easier that way.
  • Mojo_666Mojo_666 Posts: 438Member
    I have been doing this for so long I know all the recruiters that call me. :/
  • thenjdukethenjduke Posts: 894Member ■■■■□□□□□□
    I usually just tell them to send me email as well. It is easier.
    CCNA, MCP, MCSA, MCSE, MCDST, MCITP Enterprise Administrator, Working towards Networking BS. CCNP is Next.
  • DevilsbaneDevilsbane Posts: 4,212Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    Recruiters can be very helpful, but you need to keep one thing in mind.

    They are working for them, not for you. Their goal is to find you a job, and then skim as much off the top as possible. Some of them can be quite considerate, and others are solely concerned with their own paycheck coming in. I've heard good and bad things about serveral companies, and I really think it depends on which recruiter you get rather than which company you go with.

    If you don't like the game, don't work with a recruiter.

    Another thing to keep in mind is to not depend on a recruiter. They really don't care if you get employed or not as long as they get paid. So continue to job search on your own, and don't be afraid to work with multiple agencies if thats what it takes.
    Decide what to be and go be it.
  • QHaloQHalo Posts: 1,488Member
    I tell them to email me and I'll look over it. To me that's the most polite way to tell them no if they give you a description you don't like and a good way to get them off the phone with you.
  • ZaitsZaits Posts: 142Member
    I like the ones that completely forget they just called you about a week ago and then go over the same routine.
  • tpatt100tpatt100 Posts: 2,989Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    I was driving home from work one day and an Indian recruiter called me. I had him on my hands free in my car but I still almost wrecked because I was physically straining to understand what the hell he was saying. I am used to accents, I grew up with some thick accents all around me but damn this guy was horrid.
  • docricedocrice Posts: 1,706Member ■■■■■■■■■■
    I posted my resume on Dice a while back just to see what the market feels like right now. On occasion, I get notices for positions which have practically nothing to do with my focus, except perhaps it keyword-matched something on my resume. A keyword like "process."

    The following is what a recruiter sent me last week about a Process Analyst position. Keep in mind I do IT type work. I have never yelled "Bingo!" so many times when reading through the corporate buzzword bingo text:

    This position is part of the Worldwide Customer Operations organization, supporting the effort to design future processes in support of standing up a Shared Services operating model, resulting in value creation to both internal clients and external customers. The process designer will be responsible for implementing process improvement projects, which will include leading the application of business process framework, based on the DMAIC methodology and tools. This individual will also be able lead process design or improvement projects from start to finish, to facilitate teams and act as a change management agent.

    The primary effort of work will center around the end to end process for providing customer support. This role will be a part of a business process re-engineering and management team, focused on improving the current level of effectiveness and efficiency of the customer support processes. These improvements will be designed based on VoX and need to balance the needs of four primary stakeholders of the process (customers, partners, shareholders, and employees). As part of designing and implementing process improvements, it is required to be able to demonstrate with metrics the capacity of the new process, the improvement against baselines, and assess and confirm ROI. Other areas of focus include cross team collaboration to determine the process repository and documentation framework and guidelines.

    In addition, as a change agent, this role will be responsible for facilitating the skill development and building of process expertise within the organization. This role may require establishing a business process center of excellence and provide process improvement guidance and direction with a primary focus on DMAIC knowledge transfer. It will be critical to influence groups to think from a process perspective and provide practical help.


    So ... what does one actually do in a job like this again? Well, perhaps the skill set description might shed some light:

    - Strong orientation toward and use of appropriate processes to improve productivity of the organization and customer satisfaction.

    - Able to design business processes at various levels with little guidance.

    - Demonstrated knowledge of DMAIC methodology applied to the design or improvement of processes

    - Demonstrated knowledge of transactional DMAIC tools, including : process mapping, VOC, QFD, Pareto analysis, and cause and effect. Ability to document work in a format useable to others.

    - Ability to apply knowledge and understanding of all interdependencies between business processes.

    - Ability to organize and analyze data from complex transactions

    - Experience with Project leadership and management, timelines, resource, budget, risk management.

    - Strong communication and influencing skills

    - Ability to analyze, synthesize information and decompose complex issues and explain them with simplicity

    - Strong passion for the customer experience and driving solutions from a customer's perspective

    - Strong understanding of the principles of change management

    - Ability to work autonomously with high level direction to successfully deliver results, as a process designer, project lead, and to successfully drive change in organizations

    - Applies knowledge of business strategies, up-stream and down-stream business processes, and organizational objectives. Able to drive solutions consistent with approved strategies and methodologies, while
    maintaining the flexibility to adopt new methods.

    - Serve as a consultative business partner to client groups, integrating technical expertise/experience, client business objectives and marketplace factors.

    - Utilize strong teamwork skills, with a capability to build partnerships across organizations.

    - Demonstrate coaching and teach/training skills.

    - Experience in customer service industry and/or Shared Service implementation experience is a plus



    I'm thinking this has something to do with "process."
    Hopefully-useful stuff I've written: http://kimiushida.com/bitsandpieces/articles/
  • leefdaddyleefdaddy Posts: 405Member
    I've always hated dealing with recruiters... I've never got a job through one. Hopefully I never do.
    Dustin Leefers
  • I've only ever gotten one job through an outside recruiter. Can you say "mistake"? (Not that they all are but this one surely was.)

    I seriously am considering removing Arcsight from my resume altogether. I have for the last two years gotten at least a call per month from random recruiters for an Arcsight position working for Target up in Minnesota. Plus various others. They seem so confused when I tell them no too. They're like, "but wait!! you have Arcsight experience and a cert!! How can you possibly not be interested in this job?" But maybe it will help open a door so I guess will reluctantly leave it.

    Loved your post docrice. I really needed a laugh tonight.
    OK, I confess, I do have one certification. I am an ACIA - Arcsight Certified Integrator/Administrator. But it's awarded for attending the class. Woot. And while it's a fine skill to have, my interests lay elsewhere.
  • MentholMooseMentholMoose Senior Member Posts: 1,550Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    tpatt100 wrote: »
    I was driving home from work one day and an Indian recruiter called me. I had him on my hands free in my car but I still almost wrecked because I was physically straining to understand what the hell he was saying. I am used to accents, I grew up with some thick accents all around me but damn this guy was horrid.
    You gotta sign up for Google Voice, and send them to voicemail. The speech-to-text transcripts can be golden! icon_lol.gif
    MentholMoose
    LFCE - MCITP: EDA7, VA, SA, EA - MCSA:S 2003 - CCA (PVS 5, XD 3 / 4 / 5, XS 5 / 6) - VCP 4 / 5
  • Ryan82Ryan82 Posts: 428Member
    docrice, I can't tell you how many positions I have seen that by the time I have finished reading the job summary I have no idea what they are looking for.

    Here are some other things I love:

    1) Help desk positions looking for a candidate with a CCIE
    2) Receiving an e-mail from a recruiter about a position, then responding that you are interested and would like to set up a time to discuss further, and never receive a reply.
    3) Receiving an e-mail from a recruiter about a position half way around the world, and replying to them that you aren't interested in that particular position, but are interested in a position they have that is 10 minutes from where you currently work. Of course you never receive a reply. This is easily a 15 thousand dollar instant cost savings for their company
  • stuh84stuh84 Posts: 503Member
    I'm getting a little bit bored of having CCNA, CCNP, and networking experience, and yet constantly getting calls about Unix/Linux systems admin. I have no interest in that, I like to use Linux, not administer it, and given that I've got networking certs and 3-4 years of professional networking experience....have a guess what type of job I'm after!

    "We think we've found the perfect opportunity for you", my arse, you've found the perfect commission level for the month.
    Work In Progress: CCIE R&S Written

    CCIE Progress - Hours reading - 15, hours labbing - 1
  • SlowhandSlowhand MCSE: Cloud Platform and Infrastructure, MCSA: Windows Server 2003/2012/2016, CCNA Routing & Switchi Bay Area, CaliforniaPosts: 5,163Mod Mod
    I definitely know all about the wonderful ordeal of having recruiters call or email me with positions I either don't have the experience for or simply don't want because they're out-of-state. I've gotten pretty good at barraging these people with my own questions lately:
    Caller: "Hi, my name is <name> from <some placement agency>, and I have a position that you would be perfect for."
    Me: "Hi there, <name>. Is this position local to the Bay Area?"
    "Uhh. . . no. But I think the job I have for you is per--"
    "Alright, is it either a Windows admin position or a network engineering position?"
    "We're looking for a Linux administrator with SQL experience."
    "I see. Well, thank you for the call. Once you do have something local that fits my skillset, please send me an email."
    "Do you know anyone who is--"
    "I apologize for rushing off, but I have an appointment to keep. Have a nice day."
    <click>

    You'd figure that, being essentially sales people, they'd have a bit better of a sales-pitch than "no". That's my line. icon_lol.gif

    Free Microsoft Training: Microsoft Learn
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    Let it never be said that I didn't do the very least I could do.
  • Hmmmm. Maybe I should look into being a recruiter. I wonder how much they make. lol at least I am relatively technical, can LISTEN to people, and enjoy social interaction. Maybe it could scratch where I itch, even if it's not technical. Or maybe not. I tried doing data sales for a telecom, thinking I'd love it, and hated it.

    eta: this picture is not so pretty. Maybe not.

    http://swz.salary.com/salarywizard/layoutscripts/swzl_salaryresults.asp?hdSearchByOption=0&hdLocationOption=0&hdKeyword=Technical%20Recruiter&hdJobCategory=HR01&hdZipCode=&hdStateMetro=&hdJobCode=HR09200381&hdJobTitle=Technical%20Recruiter&hdCurrentTab=&hdNarrowDesc=Human%20Resources
    OK, I confess, I do have one certification. I am an ACIA - Arcsight Certified Integrator/Administrator. But it's awarded for attending the class. Woot. And while it's a fine skill to have, my interests lay elsewhere.
  • snokerpokersnokerpoker Posts: 661Member ■■■■□□□□□□
    My experiences with them are pretty bad too I suppose. Every time they contact me about a job, it is for some entry level 30-60 day project for little pay. It is frustrating because I find myself telling them the same thing over and over, "I'm currently employed full time. I do not want a temp position." Then they basically say they totally understand and that if anything else pops up, they will keep me in mind.
  • ssampierssampier Posts: 224Member
    I haven't too bad of experience with recruiters, most of them are friendly and polite. I just don't trust them worth a sharpened stick. :)

    I did have an Indian or Pakistani fellow call me today. I had a difficult time understanding him. I have zero problems normally (with their people or accent), but this guy's accent was very thick.

    He indicated the salary was $28 an hour on a 1099. I told him I wasn't interested in a 1099 position, but I could do a W2 position. He said he could do a W2 and he was going to round it up to $30 an hour. I honestly don't think he knows what a W2 is. Nice guy, otherwise.

    I really doubt anything will come of it, but it does, that's good, too.

    Edit: There was another recruiter advertising a senior security position in Vegas. Really nice guy, but I don't remotely qualify. It's on CareerBuilder if you're curious.
    Future Plans:

    JNCIA Firewall
    CCNA:Security
    CCNP

    More security exams and then the world.
  • blargoeblargoe Self-Described Huguenot NC, USAPosts: 4,171Member ■■■■■■■■■□
    There are some really good recruiters and a whole bunch of really horrible ones. I've been fortunate to know a couple of good ones.
    IT guy since 12/00

    Recent: 11/2019 - RHCSA (RHEL 7); 2/2019 - Updated VCP to 6.5 (just a few days before VMware discontinued the re-cert policy...)
    Working on: RHCE/Ansible
    Future: Probably continued Red Hat Immersion, Possibly VCAP Design, or maybe a completely different path. Depends on job demands...
  • SliznutSliznut Posts: 21Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    Wow. lol. After I got my A+ I kept getting emails insisting I take a job with Dell as a field tech fixing people's PCs. Even after explaining they were offering me about half of what I currently make I STILL get them.
  • howiehandleshowiehandles Posts: 148Member
    Ryan82 wrote: »
    docrice, I can't tell you how many positions I have seen that by the time I have finished reading the job summary I have no idea what they are looking for.

    Here are some other things I love:

    1) Help desk positions looking for a candidate with a CCIE
    2) Receiving an e-mail from a recruiter about a position, then responding that you are interested and would like to set up a time to discuss further, and never receive a reply.
    3) Receiving an e-mail from a recruiter about a position half way around the world, and replying to them that you aren't interested in that particular position, but are interested in a position they have that is 10 minutes from where you currently work. Of course you never receive a reply. This is easily a 15 thousand dollar instant cost savings for their company

    I love "1", especially when you specifically know the position in question, and know that they're not looking for an CISSP, for an entry level help desk position dealing with XP. At least if they're polite, I'll return said kindness. But the one's who clearly don't know squat about I.T., and thing if they throw a few acronyms around, you'll be impressed with their knowledge.
  • phantasmphantasm Posts: 995Member
    I just got a call from a recruiter yesterday, he used my name 15 times in 2 minutes. He kept offering me a position in GA for resident engineer telling me I am more than qualified with just 2.5yrs in networking and my CCNA. roflmao.

    I asked him if he knew what an RE did, he said they support networks and answer the phone. I told him to call me back when he got a clue.
    "No man ever steps in the same river twice, for it's not the same river and he's not the same man." -Heraclitus
  • TurgonTurgon Posts: 6,313Banned
    Just a wee rant. A recruiter called shortly after emailing me about what was essentially my prior position in DC. I told him repeatedly that this was actually my former position and that I needed to stay in Texas. He just kept repeating that he had an opportunity in Washington DC for me. When I finally convinced him that I wasn't interested, he asked if I had friends who might be. I told him everyone I knew with that skill set (a pretty specific one) already worked at that company.

    It's just frustrating. I am pretty clear online where I am willing to move to and people disregard it all the time.

    Anyone else?

    Recruiters generally dont listen. They match jobs to people and not the other way around. Its frustrating but dont worry about it too much.
  • puppy001puppy001 Posts: 31Banned ■■□□□□□□□□
    It really does not matter if the recruiters lie or do anything as long as you are employed that is what matters, I mean come on this I.T world is full of fakers and idiots.
  • Ryan82Ryan82 Posts: 428Member
    How about this line from a job posting I just saw:

    Working knowledge of UNIX SOLARIS and Windows operating systems - Generator and air conditioning maintenance is a plus

    I mean, I understand that with the economy in shambles companies are trying to find individuals who are cross-trained, but Solaris and generator maintenance? Awesome..
  • earweedearweed Posts: 5,192Member ■■■■■■■■■□
    Quite frankly I don't care if the recruiter listens or not or if he's a snake or the nicest guy around. If he/she will find me a job in IT I'll be happy.
    No longer work in IT. Play around with stuff sometimes still and fix stuff for friends and relatives.
  • varelgvarelg Posts: 790Banned
    docrice wrote: »
    I posted my resume on Dice a while back just to see what the market feels like right now. On occasion, I get notices for positions which have practically nothing to do with my focus, except perhaps it keyword-matched something on my resume. A keyword like "process."

    The following is what a recruiter sent me last week about a Process Analyst position. Keep in mind I do IT type work. I have never yelled "Bingo!" so many times when reading through the corporate buzzword bingo text:

    So ... what does one actually do in a job like this again? Well, perhaps the skill set description might shed some light:



    I'm thinking this has something to do with "process."
    This position gets a paycheck as well? I mean, since nothing clearly is set out, you don't have to actually do anything tangible. Interesting, Miflin- Dindler Paper companies really exist in the real world and not just at "The Office" filming set.
    Recruiter chasing buzzwords, candidates stuffing their resumes with buzzwords, corporations stuffing their whitepapers with buzzwords... it would be amazing to see anything actually done in IT?
    I am posioning the forums.
  • Bl8ckr0uterBl8ckr0uter Posts: 5,031Inactive Imported Users ■■■■■■■■□□
    Ryan82 wrote: »
    How about this line from a job posting I just saw:

    Working knowledge of UNIX SOLARIS and Windows operating systems - Generator and air conditioning maintenance is a plus

    I mean, I understand that with the economy in shambles companies are trying to find individuals who are cross-trained, but Solaris and generator maintenance? Awesome..


    I can actually see this if it is a datacenter type position. Many DC techs need to understand HVAC/Generator systems
  • miller811miller811 Posts: 897Member
    read this yesterday and laughed my ass off...

    Not sure what happened to this guy, but read his rant on recruiters starts about half way down.

    I am writing this month to share with you all my recent experiences as a CCIE by Joe Astorino


    here are some highlights

    •If a recruiter calls me and I can’t understand a word coming out of their mouth, I hang up immediately. Plain and simple. I don’t have time for that. If you can’t speak my language adequately, how in the world are you going to land me a job interview?

    •If a recruiter leaves me a voice mail and after the first 3 seconds I am having a hard time understanding them, I delete it immediately without finishing the message.

    •The vast majority (90% I would say) of these people are blood sucking maggots that are exactly like that car salesman I talked about......
    I don't claim to be an expert, but I sure would like to become one someday.

    Quest for 11K pages read in 2011
    Page Count total to date - 1283
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