NEWBIE to IT

RhemalogosRhemalogos Registered Users Posts: 3 ■□□□□□□□□□
Hello to all, I am currently 8 months away from graduating with a BS in Computer Information Systems. I am 30 years old with no experience in IT. I have worked in sales for 4 years and previously worked in fraud investigations for 3 years. I have no idea what I want to do after I graduate which is why I would like advice, steps to take, or suggestions from anybody here.

Comments

  • phantasmphantasm Member Posts: 995
    Nobody can tell you what to do after you graduate. But since you're asking for advice here's what I would do.

    Start working towards some certifications. The ones most recommended here are the A+, Net+ and Sec+. These three will give you a broad overview of various technologies and practices in use in the IT industry. I would also suggest you look for a job in either the helpdesk of a NOC (Network Operations Centers). Most people start out in the helpdesk at Tier I. In that position you do things like resetting passwords and unlocking accounts. However it varies by company but for the most part it's the same.

    After completing the three certifications I mentioned you should look to specialize. The real money in the IT field is in specialization. If you like the systems side of the house and want to work on servers then look into the Microsoft branch of certifications. Specifically I would look at MCDST (if you wanted a helpdesk cert) and an MCITP:SA || EA (Server Admin or Enterprise Admin).

    If you want to do more networking then look to the CCENT followed by a CCNA. This will give you a good theoretical knowledge base of which you will need to build practical skills on. Networking, in some companies comes after the helpdesk, in other companies it's an entirely different approach. For example, at a major ISP/Cable company I worked at you started at the helpdesk then after 5yrs could move to the network helpdesk. After 2 years in the network helpdesk and your CCNA you could move onto the LAN group. The WAN group required a lot more experience.

    In the end what you need most is patience. You will be competing with out of work technicians/engineers who have experience you do not have and probably a cert or two you don't have. You will have to work hard, very hard to get anywhere in this industry. It's not impossible, but some days it can feel like it is.
    "No man ever steps in the same river twice, for it's not the same river and he's not the same man." -Heraclitus
  • networker050184networker050184 Mod Posts: 11,962 Mod
    IT is such a huge field its almost impossible to give you sound advice at this point. What interests you about IT? What made you want to go down this path?

    Most people here are in the administration or engineering type roles of IT so you will probably get some sound advice if thats what you want to do. Not many programers around here so this might not be the best place to look for that kind of career advice.

    Good luck!
    An expert is a man who has made all the mistakes which can be made.
  • jamesleecolemanjamesleecoleman Member Posts: 1,899 ■■■■■□□□□□
    If you can volunteer somewhere or get an internship, try that while you're finishing up so you can use that experience and put it on your resume. Then you'll have certifications with experience.
    Booya!!
    WIP : | CISSP [2018] | CISA [2018] | CAPM [2018] | eCPPT [2018] | CRISC [2019] | TORFL (TRKI) B1 | Learning: | Russian | Farsi |
    *****You can fail a test a bunch of times but what matters is that if you fail to give up or not*****
  • brad-brad- Member Posts: 1,218
    2 things:

    1 - Network. People in your classes, friends, friends of friends...thats more than likely how you'll land a job.

    2 - Pick what you want to do. IT is a big world. Programming, networking, web design, graphic design, desktop support, server support, database...the list is long.

    Whatever suits you, go after it. Dont expect it to come quickly, you will more than likely have to start at or near the bottom. You may have to work in a feild you dont particularly want - it doesnt matter, make the most of it and get the experience.

    2 'areas' to look into - proprietary software, and medical. They probably have the most jobs you can get into with little to no xp.

    If you want to get into frontline support, I tend to disagree with the A+/N+/Sec+ trifecta...unless you know an employer specifcally wants them. You can get the MCDST (XP) or MCITP flavor for Windows 7 at much less cost. Those will at least get you on the scoreboard in the certification land. However if you do want the comptia certs, get them now before they retire the lifetime exams in favor of the renewing exams.
  • N2ITN2IT Inactive Imported Users Posts: 7,483 ■■■■■■■■■■
    IT Sales

    Make some big coin!
  • RhemalogosRhemalogos Registered Users Posts: 3 ■□□□□□□□□□
    I'd like to learn either Information security or Networking with a lean more towards info sec. I have a few years of fraud investigations and corporate governance. thoughts? I know the Sec + is available w/o experience. I heard the CISSP was a pain to obtain?
  • RobertKaucherRobertKaucher Member Posts: 4,298 ■■■■■■■■■■
    phantasm wrote: »

    Specifically I would look at MCDST (if you wanted a helpdesk cert) and an MCITP:SA || EA (Server Admin or Enterprise Admin).

    Be aware that the MCDST exams expire in March of 2011.
    Microsoft Learning: Microsoft Certification Exam Development
  • aprillove20aprillove20 Registered Users Posts: 6 ■□□□□□□□□□
    @Rhemalogos apply to a company which is relate to your course. it's normal if you don't know some ideas about IT,actually you will learn those as you keep on working, because your co workers gonna teach you, i mean help you.
  • jimmyclark259jimmyclark259 Registered Users Posts: 1 ■□□□□□□□□□
    Rhemalogos wrote: »
    Hello to all, I am currently 8 months away from graduating with a BS in Computer Information Systems. I am 30 years old with no experience in IT. I have worked in sales for 4 years and previously worked in fraud investigations for 3 years. I have no idea what I want to do after I graduate which is why I would like advice, steps to take, or suggestions from anybody here.

    You will then look for a job and concentrate with it.
    That would be the time to apply the knowledge and skills you've learned from school. Build your name in the industry you belong.

    i put all my genius into my life; I put only my talent into my works. choose hot tubs direct choosehottubsdirect reviews
  • it_consultantit_consultant Member Posts: 1,903
    What was the focus of your CIS studies? As someone mentioned IT is a big field. Did you focus on programming, database, security, networking? That will really help to narrow your focus.
  • headshotheadshot Member Posts: 77 ■■□□□□□□□□
    phantasm wrote: »
    Nobody can tell you what to do after you graduate. But since you're asking for advice here's what I would do.

    Start working towards some certifications. The ones most recommended here are the A+, Net+ and Sec+. These three will give you a broad overview of various technologies and practices in use in the IT industry. I would also suggest you look for a job in either the helpdesk of a NOC (Network Operations Centers). Most people start out in the helpdesk at Tier I. In that position you do things like resetting passwords and unlocking accounts. However it varies by company but for the most part it's the same.

    After completing the three certifications I mentioned you should look to specialize. The real money in the IT field is in specialization. If you like the systems side of the house and want to work on servers then look into the Microsoft branch of certifications. Specifically I would look at MCDST (if you wanted a helpdesk cert) and an MCITP:SA || EA (Server Admin or Enterprise Admin).

    If you want to do more networking then look to the CCENT followed by a CCNA. This will give you a good theoretical knowledge base of which you will need to build practical skills on. Networking, in some companies comes after the helpdesk, in other companies it's an entirely different approach. For example, at a major ISP/Cable company I worked at you started at the helpdesk then after 5yrs could move to the network helpdesk. After 2 years in the network helpdesk and your CCNA you could move onto the LAN group. The WAN group required a lot more experience.

    In the end what you need most is patience. You will be competing with out of work technicians/engineers who have experience you do not have and probably a cert or two you don't have. You will have to work hard, very hard to get anywhere in this industry. It's not impossible, but some days it can feel like it is.

    If having to choose between security+ and a+ which would you choose? No offense intended to anyone with a+ but to me it seems this certificate is geared more towards hardware repair which really doesn't pay much where I live, further my interest lies strictly in computer networking. I ask this because with only the rest of the month left for life certification, I feel it's one or the other at this point...not to mention the A+ isn't exactly cheap. I'm pretty familiar with networking concepts and have bought Gibson's security+ kindle book yesterday and read through the first chapter and did the practice questions and feel I can handle the material. My logic is the security+ would look better on the resume combined with the Cisco certs I'm pursuing.
  • TurgonTurgon Banned Posts: 6,313 ■■■■■■■■■□
    Rhemalogos wrote: »
    Hello to all, I am currently 8 months away from graduating with a BS in Computer Information Systems. I am 30 years old with no experience in IT. I have worked in sales for 4 years and previously worked in fraud investigations for 3 years. I have no idea what I want to do after I graduate which is why I would like advice, steps to take, or suggestions from anybody here.

    Try the niche stuff first and then go general for searching out potential job opportunities. Check out firms that sell IT security services first. With your sales and fraud investigation experience you have a lever in there. Assuming that tanks and it very well might, then use the same pitch for the general employment field in IT, which means helpdesk for starters. Once you are in helpdesk, seek to rise within the ranks inside 6 - 12 months. If that doesnt happen for you find a job with another company. The first 5 years in IT you are looking for a solid foundation but also incremental if not accelerated career progression so you move out of the infantry.

    Get some used books off amazon for a few dollars for the entry level certifications and do some reading. You put these certification tracks down on the CV in terms of what you are presently studying. Dont get hung up on certification, while useful it can divert much of your time, energy and money away from what is really important, getting mentally up for the challenge of convincing someone to hire you, and being technically equipped to handle a job when you get one. Your own research is just as important as a study track in this regard.
  • ajs1976ajs1976 Member Posts: 1,945 ■■■■□□□□□□
    network with people. Find an internship, work at the student helpdesk, something to get experience.
    Andy

    2020 Goals: 0 of 2 courses complete, 0 of 2 exams complete
  • joshmadakorjoshmadakor Member Posts: 495 ■■■■□□□□□□
    ajs1976 wrote: »
    ...work at the student helpdesk...

    This is how I started. I was really assertive (in a non-annoying way) and learned my surroundings. 2 years later I was able to get a full-time state position (IT Specialist 3) in the same department.

    This was NOT easy however, I failed 2 interviews and had to really, REALLY work hard. But in the end, I ended up getting hired.
    WGU B.S. Information Technology (Completed January 2013)
  • PaperlanternPaperlantern Member Posts: 352
    I agree on the networking aspect as well (the social networking, not IT networking, heh). That has landed me the last 3 jobs I've had. Yes it was me who initiated the break into IT, but through working in IT, I made contacts and friends, many of which i still hang out with on weekends occasionally, even though I haven't worked with them in any capacity in years, but, them being influential people in the IT industry, and them knowing that I am a good worker with good experience, they offered me positions before looking at anyone else. Having friends in the IT industry is absolutely priceless.
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