What should I do? Guide me!

WrennyWrenny Posts: 3Member ■□□□□□□□□□
I got A+ about a year ago. I took a class first then I got a practice examine which turned out to be the same exact questions on the test so I got through very easily.

I was going to try for MCSE but then everything went to hell. Dropped outta that school and now I work at Comp USA as a salesmen.

My friend took accelrated CCNA 1 week class 8am-8pm and got his cert 2nd try. Now he works for dept of defense and that really inspired me on how hard he worked and now it pays off.

I never did great in school, aside from Computer courses such as Multimedia, flash etc, because I enjoyed it. A+ was easy and I enjoyed. Not sure If I'm going to enjoy studying 24-7 for CCNA but I don't know even if I tried so hard would I grasp it? I've known about computers forever, using them forever. Mainly just A+ technician crap, not much network experience except from my own home.

How hard is CCNA? How much do you have to study? Etc..
What do I wanna do with my life!

Comments

  • WebmasterWebmaster Posts: 10,292Admin
    You could do the Net+ cert first to be sure you got the network basics covered you need for CCNA....
    I would say passing the CCNA exam is harder than passing any MCSE exam, but not because of the topics, just the much lower passing score of MS exams that make them easier to pass. If you can get hold of a router or two and preferably a switch (OR a router simulator), and buy a good book, than it is very doable. But don't take it to lightly, it's way harder than CompTIA exams. Although the advantage with Cisco exams is that they are much more straight-forward, no trick questions, just the facts.
    CCNA is rather detailed, they can think of ten questions about the same topic, all completely different.

    I would never hire a CCNA that got his CCNA in a 1 week bootcamp. Remember that it is the skills you should be after, not the cert itself....

    I hope this helps a bit!

    Johan
  • aznluvsmcaznluvsmc Posts: 47Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    Hey Webmaster, does CCNA really test you on how to interconnect devices? I always thought that was covered in CCNP and CCIE. Anyways, if it does I assume the interconnection is strictly specific to CISCO devices. How much do CISCO switches and routers run? I'm looking at purchasing a switch and/or router when I study for CCNA next year. I don't really want to do routersims as I find you are kind of limited in the ability to explore all the possibilites.
  • WebmasterWebmaster Posts: 10,292Admin
    aznluvsmc wrote:
    Hey Webmaster, does CCNA really test you on how to interconnect devices? I always thought that was covered in CCNP and CCIE. Anyways, if it does I assume the interconnection is strictly specific to CISCO devices.
    Good question... considering the name if the appropriate course.... icon_wink.gif
    Yes you have to know the basics, interconnecting devices as in configuring routed protocols and allow for data transfer, in this context access-lists are also important, as well as basic routing protocol configuration and interconnecting devices using different types of media and lan and wan technologies such as ISDN and Frame Relay. You really have to know how to do this (acutally confiugre the router). Unfortunately in real life many CCNAs are not able to actually be a CCNA and perform the tasks without assistance and on the other hand it is hard to get a "Cisco job" with only your CCNA. This results in employers and employees starting to consider CCNA as an entry-level basic routing and switching knowledge exam, in turn resulting in many people under estimating the exam. The Exam Topics as listed at the cisco ccna site are rather detailed and pretty much cover it all... It's just as I used to tell my MCSE students: "It's not that hard... it's just a lot."

    Anyway, you need to interconnect cisco devices using IOS software commands, not physically.
    aznluvsmc wrote:
    How much do CISCO switches and routers run? I'm looking at purchasing a switch and/or router when I study for CCNA next year. I don't really want to do routersims as I find you are kind of limited in the ability to explore all the possibilites.

    For a home lab, the minimum would be two routers (2500/2600 or higher) and one catalyst 19xx switch or higher... prices per piece of (used) equipement ranges from about $400 to several thousands. But if you are planning on taking CCNP and/or CCIE it'll be the best investement you ever made and else you can easily pass them on to the next student.

    Johan
  • WrennyWrenny Posts: 3Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    Should I get the Todd router simulator kit and his book from routersim.com?

    Is that a good study guide? I want to study that book, the simulators, and take maybe that boot camp or just regular classes on CCNA. So I can learn from all angles.
    What do I wanna do with my life!
  • WebmasterWebmaster Posts: 10,292Admin
    Seems like a great kit to me. You really don't need the bootcamp if you buy that kit, if you really want to take a intructor led course I suggest you take the ICND course. Bootcamps are known for covering just that what you need to know for the current exam's question pool, some teach straight from the braindumps and some even pass them out. All to keep the passing % up. Personally I would rather spend some money on a second book when you have the sim. Todd Lammle is considered the best author for CCNA study material by many people, but there is no single book that covers it all. A second option would be a CCNA guide by cisco press.

    Good luck!
  • WrennyWrenny Posts: 3Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    I want to do the book, kit, and classes just so I can make sure I pass. Hell with all that I might not even pass.

    I found classes at a local place, Tri C, that are like 2 days a week, for a month. Thats not intense boot camp but it gives me the hands on experience.

    But I'm going to start with that kit. I'm doing it with a friend of mine thats a little bit more network savvy then me but he doesn't have any certs, so hopefully I'll pass.
    What do I wanna do with my life!
  • sikdoggsikdogg Posts: 43Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    I think that simulators are good for someone just getting started because they're inexpensive and they will allow you to get used to the CLI interface. The down side of simulators is that you are VERY LIMITED in what you are able to do in terms of configuration and aren't able to experiment with a router's other features. My advice is to start with simulators while you slowly build a home lab of real routers/switches.

    You can find 2500 series routers and 1900 series switches on Ebay selling for $200 or less. If you have buddies that share the same interest in networking, you can do what I did when I got started and that is to combine your resources and build a home lab together. This will allow you to study together and work toward a common goal. By the time my study group decided to separate, we had all passed our CCNA and CCNP exams and build a lab with frame-relay, ISDN, Cat5000 w/RSM, a PIX firewall, Cisco IDS, and even managed to get a copy of CiscoWorks and Cisco ACS.
  • aznluvsmcaznluvsmc Posts: 47Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    Ok, thanks for clearing that up! Now here's probably the biggest question. Regarding study books, are the books written by Cisco sufficeint in covering the materials or do you recommend other books instead?
  • WebmasterWebmaster Posts: 10,292Admin
    Well, like I said, if it comes to CCNA, Todd Lammle is considered the best. But for every (other) Cisco exam I would recommend getting the Cisco Press books. Nevertheless you should always read additional resources... well actually 1 main resource: www.cisco.com icon_wink.gif
  • hpgnauhpgnau Posts: 11Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    Best advice would be to start with Network +, it will give you a foundation for CCNA. Otherwise prepare yourself for a rough riide ahead
  • ghaoufghaouf Posts: 317Inactive Imported Users
    start with net+ you need to learn to walk before you could run
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