Martial Arts

/usr/usr Member Posts: 1,768
I've wanted to get involved in some type for quite some time now. I recently found an instructor around here and it seems my choices are between Karate, Kodokan Judo, and Fudo Shin Ryu JuJitsu. I'm leaning towards Judo, but I'm unsure.

Has anyone here taken and sort of martial arts? If so, what was your experience, what did you take, etc?
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Comments

  • Ricka182Ricka182 Member Posts: 3,359
    I only have some limited military line training, which isn't much, but I can defend myself at the least. Karate is pretty basic, self-defense, but I have nothing against it. Judo being a good way to learn how to throw people around like rag dolls. For a recco though, I would go with the Fudo Shin Ryu JuJitsu, it sounds cool, and JuJitsu in itself is a nasty martial art.
    i remain, he who remains to be....
  • Orion82698Orion82698 Member Posts: 483
    Karate is pretty basic

    Not true. There are four different styles of Karate.

    I took karate for 2 years, and I'm studying Akido now. When studying Akido, you would be amazed at what your mind can do....

    Try asking your same question in the forum. They have helped me out a lot.

    http://www.karateforums.com/
    WIP Vacation ;-)

    Porsche..... there is no substitute!
  • Ricka182Ricka182 Member Posts: 3,359
    For me there too many Arts really. Anyone can just make there own style, and start a new art. I don't classify them together, If Akido is also Karate, I still call it Akido. Isn't Akido the same as Steven Seagal does in his movies??......someone showed me something like that, he says, "Hey, grab my wrists..." Woops..bad idea, The guy flipped me like a damn pancake before I could blink......I do respect them, it's just confuzziling with all the different styles sometimes that's all.
    i remain, he who remains to be....
  • /usr/usr Member Posts: 1,768
    I researched a bit after I received a reply from the local instructor. It seems that around the 1890's in Japan, there was a transition period in which JuJitsu kind of became Judo. From what I gather, JuJitsu is more just the martial arts form, but Judo is a way of life.

    I'm not sure. I'll look into each style more, but I just don't want to take karate. Nothing against it, I just want to take something else.
  • WebmasterWebmaster Admin Posts: 10,292 Admin
    I've taken Pencak Silat for about 3 years and some kick boxing over a decade ago. Martial arts are quite popular here and most people I know did it at some point.

    Judo is better than working with weights, in order words it will make you strong, no hitting and kicking, lots of pushing, pulling, falling, and body contact, sometimes wrestling-like. Karate... depends a lot on what particular style. Here it's (often unjust) considered 'woody', as in rigid movements. JuJitsu is the basis of all, pure self-defence though, which makes the training (sparring) less 'interesting' imo (i.e. one is hitting with a rubber knife/bottle/stick).

    The 'better' choice depends a lot on what you want to do with it. Do you want to dance (kung fu), win in a croudy bar-fight (boxing), show off on the parking lot (Tai Kwon do), mental and/or physical training. If you plan to this several times a week for as many years as possible it doesn't matter much. In that case I'd probably go for the best possible instructor as there are so many different martial arts and styles to choose from. Also, the less people there are in class, the better. Here you can get a 1-on-1 session for about $75 per hour. If you do that once a month in addition to group training it will make a huge difference.

    I went to Thailand in 2001 (to Phuket, yes... icon_sad.gif) and had a couple of hours training from mr. Sakka Semlek who was a national champion for many years. You can get a month training, including a bungalow in many places, amazingly cheap in many places in Thailand. Something else than the regular holidays. ;)

    Anyway, most schools offer a free trial lesson, so you can check which one is most 'fun' first. Good luck with your decision!
  • Orion82698Orion82698 Member Posts: 483
    For me there too many Arts really. Anyone can just make there own style, and start a new art. I don't classify them together, If Akido is also Karate, I still call it Akido. Isn't Akido the same as Steven Seagal does in his movies??......someone showed me something like that, he says, "Hey, grab my wrists..." Woops..bad idea, The guy flipped me like a damn pancake before I could blink......I do respect them, it's just confuzziling with all the different styles sometimes that's all.

    Yeah, there are so many different styles. It would be impossible to master them all, even master two of them. For some, it takes a life time of training and practice to become a master. 10 Dan (degree black belt) is the highest you can get, from my understanding. Anything over 10 dan is an award from master to student. Yeah, Akido is what Steven Seagal practices. I think the movie was "above the law" when he's throwing the guys all around. Akido is a peaceful martial art. It's focus is to defuse the situation before it becomes physical contact. I wish I had more time to practice. I'm also trying with a weapon, the Bo. I have put many holes in my wall with this icon_lol.gif

    What ever you choose, good luck. I'm thinking of taking Tae Kwon Do in the summer. I love them high kicks !!!
    WIP Vacation ;-)

    Porsche..... there is no substitute!
  • /usr/usr Member Posts: 1,768
    I have always been fascinated with martial arts. Unfortunately, I live in a rural area and I was lucky to find anything offered but karate, which my local college offers.

    I asked the instructor to explain the difference between JuJitsu and Judo. I want to take something for the exercise, because it seems fun, because I love learning new things, for self-defense, and like I said, because I just find it fascinating.

    I would like to take something that involves some striking, though not necessarily based on the concept, which I thought Judo did.
  • WebmasterWebmaster Admin Posts: 10,292 Admin
    /usr wrote:
    I would like to take something that involves some striking, though not necessarily based on the concept, which I thought Judo did.
    Well, there maybe a style that does involve striking. But in 'normal' judo' (i.e. like you could have seen on the Olympics) there is no striking, it's actually against the rules. In judo, the first thing you usually do is grab your sparring partner (or enemy) and you basically try to throw him on the ground. As I mentioned in my reply above, there's no hitting and kicking.
  • WebmasterWebmaster Admin Posts: 10,292 Admin
    something that involves some striking, though not necessarily based on the concept,
    In that case, if you need to choose between JuJitsu and Judo, the former is definitely the better choice, although all striking and kicking will be in response to an attack, as part of a self-defence technique (rather than focussing on how to kick right/hard/high/with style).
  • Ricka182Ricka182 Member Posts: 3,359
    I know someone, who if you'd look at the guy, you'd see a Doctor, in his 50's, about 5-9, maybe 175, a bit heavy, but you wouldn't know he is martial arts master. He has like 20 tropheys for the Bo and TKD, and could easily kick most asses. That's what is cool about the Arts, you don't know who knows what. Makes you think about who to pick a fight with sometimes.....not through my own experience I might add. Some jackass a few weeks ago at a local bar was screwing with the "new guy" at the bar. hahahaha I couldn't believe how fast the guy was.....I mean how fast the jackass hit ther ground after getting knocked the *oops* out. Maybe someday, I'll get into something, but I'm going for a surgery on my shoulder, so I think I should let heal first.....
    i remain, he who remains to be....
  • TranscenderMichaelTranscenderMichael Member Posts: 187
    Aikido is different from Karate. I once considered taking it, but never got around to doing so - the class was 30 minutes from home.
    TranscenderMichael (at hotmail.com)
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  • WebmasterWebmaster Admin Posts: 10,292 Admin
    Yeah, Aikido is using the force of your opponent, taking the way of least resistance. Pretty cool to be advanced in that, taking people by the nose, litteraly... don't feel much for the outfit though.
  • Orion82698Orion82698 Member Posts: 483
    .. don't feel much for the outfit though.
    Huh?  In my class, we wear the same gi as other martial arts classes.  I think your referring to the gi that Morehei Ueshiba (founder of Aikido) would wear.  That is a loose gi.
    
    WIP Vacation ;-)

    Porsche..... there is no substitute!
  • WebmasterWebmaster Admin Posts: 10,292 Admin
    Yeah, I've seen only the loose wider ones here.
  • garv221garv221 Member Posts: 1,914
    Ricka182 wrote:
    Some jackass a few weeks ago at a local bar was screwing with the "new guy" at the bar. hahahaha I couldn't believe how fast the guy was.....I mean how fast the jackass hit ther ground after getting knocked the *oops* out. Maybe someday,

    I love to see the "tough guy" at the bar get stomped. Someone breaks out the "whip your ass style" karate.
  • Non-Profit TechieNon-Profit Techie Member Posts: 418
    watch the UFC to help you decide ;) Seems Jujitsu is the king of the ring.
  • /usr/usr Member Posts: 1,768
    I don't plan on entering the UFC. icon_wink.gif
  • ajs1976ajs1976 Member Posts: 1,945 ■■■■□□□□□□
    I asked a similiar question on a differenct computer board about 7 months ago. I have been doing Taekwondo for over 6 months now.

    I would suggesting learning a little about the different arts that are in your area and then do some trial lessons on the ones you are interested in. I think the instructor and the style of training are more important then the art.
    Andy

    2020 Goals: 0 of 2 courses complete, 0 of 2 exams complete
  • ajs1976ajs1976 Member Posts: 1,945 ■■■■□□□□□□
    From what I have picked up.

    Jujutsu involves a lot of joint locks and throws. Some styles have alot of strikes, but are mainly used to soften up your openent so you can do something else nasty to him.

    Judo is kind of like a sport version of Jujutsu.
    Andy

    2020 Goals: 0 of 2 courses complete, 0 of 2 exams complete
  • ajs1976ajs1976 Member Posts: 1,945 ■■■■□□□□□□
    If anyone that is interested, one of the MA forums I go to is www.martialwarrior.com. It is a good place with friendly people.

    Here is a note that is posted be the Administration staff at the site:
    We would like to welcome you to Martial Warrior. This is a professional discussion board for practitioners and Instructors of the Martial Arts, Close Quarter Combatives, Mixed Martial Arts, High Liability Professions and Self-Defense Systems. We are open to all arts, systems, ranks and levels. Practitioners and Instructors should feel free to fellowship, exchange information and network.

    As this is a professional board, cyber-warriors and trolls will not be tolerated here. Those having legitimate questions or comments may post here as long as it remains professional.

    Feel free to share this board with others that you know. We are always looking for new members of any level of experience.
    Andy

    2020 Goals: 0 of 2 courses complete, 0 of 2 exams complete
  • Orion82698Orion82698 Member Posts: 483
    I have been doing Taekwondo for over 6 months now.

    What do you think of TKD? I have been looking into this, and I want to try studying Aikido as well as TKD, but I don't want to have problems with Aikido.
    WIP Vacation ;-)

    Porsche..... there is no substitute!
  • skully93skully93 Member Posts: 322 ■■■□□□□□□□
    ooh! Something I can talk on!

    I've been taking martial arts for nearly 21 years now. I've studied some for a very short time, and others for a much longer period. I really do enjoy it, and I wouldn't be me without the training. I also had the chance to do some cool security gigs because of the experience.

    Tae Kwon Do- Good for getting in shape, but as taught in the States, it's often more of a sport than a combat art. It can't hurt though.

    Taijutsu- Under one of the last living legends in Ninjutsu left in the world. I trained under him for 9 years. Tough stuff, very spiritual, and involves the psyche. More of a lifestyle really.

    Shotokan Karate-I found the particular teacher for this one a bit tough for no real reason, but the advanced students were pretty solid. Just wasn't my style, but if you really like getting the crap knocked out of you, it's one of the older styles.

    Kung-fu- We've been fortunate to study the past 5 years in a more traditional style. It's hard, and they expect you to use your mind a lot. The movements can be really akward at first, but it trains those little muscles like nothing else.

    Tai Chi-Goes right along with Kung-fu. Slow, fluid, healthy. It takes an eternity to really get good at it (10 years seems to be the going rate to be considered a worthwhile student...) but it's incredible stuff. I highly recommend doing it if you can. A lot of Kung-Fu and Kenpo schools teach it in addition.

    There are THOUSANDS of styles of Karate and Kung-fu especially. Many families in their respective regions had their own lineage. There are still many that fall into a more broad category, so will call themselves Okinawan Karate or Shao-lin Kung Fu.

    Any other martial art is just as valid so long as the teacher isn't a yutz.

    With that being said, teachers/schools are tough to find. The big chain places that promise you a black belt within a couple of years but charge you a ton of money should be avoided. You aren't learning much besides the art of the empty wallet. A lot of smaller, out of the way things are much better. Often hard to find, they're well worth it no matter the style.

    I would ask for a quiet personal session with a senior teacher if possible. Investigate many schools in your area. Most schools will let you do a few trial lessons before committing, and if they don't, screw them. A good teacher will be testing you as you test them. All schools have some sales aspect to them, but if they come of as used car salesmen, run. Most still require contracts, but asking you to commit to more than 6 months or a year seems outrageous.

    And finally, expect to hurt, a lot, at first. It's amazing what the body adapts to! I love it. Good luck!
    I do not have a psychiatrist and I do not want one, for the simple reason that if he listened to me long enough, he might become disturbed.

    -- James Thurber
  • ajs1976ajs1976 Member Posts: 1,945 ■■■■□□□□□□
    orion82698,

    I like it. I started as a way to get in shape and TKD and all of its kicking is definetly helping me with that.

    I asked others about studying two different arts. Most people said to wait until reaching BB in one art before starting another. They said it is easier to learn a second if you already know the basics of the first. That way you aren't getting the two mixed up as you learn them.
    Andy

    2020 Goals: 0 of 2 courses complete, 0 of 2 exams complete
  • Ricka182Ricka182 Member Posts: 3,359
    Okay, so what can do with Tai Chi? I see people doing it, but they're just moving very slow, and doing weird body holds with themselves. It may be a martial art, but can it be used for combat or defense specifically? The guy I know who is a Bo master also does Tai Chi, I've just never seen or asked him about it, I don't see the guy that much. The only MA I really want to learn is Capoeira. I'm just not going to Brazil for 12 months to learn. There is a small school for it not too far from me, but I've heard they have relations with an infamous old karate teacher who sold black belts for an extra $100(martial ****). He's moved many times, and I think he's up on the shore now, away from most people, or probably retired and sold the name.
    i remain, he who remains to be....
  • /usr/usr Member Posts: 1,768
    And finally, expect to hurt, a lot, at first. It's amazing what the body adapts to!

    It may sound dumb, but I used to skateboard around 2 years ago. I was decent, but fell quite often getting that way. Falling flat onto the pavement a few times makes you learn quickly how to adjust to be hurt the least. I'll manage the pain. icon_wink.gif
  • stndrd_123stndrd_123 Member Posts: 113
    I would suggest you look into places that teach MMA (mixed martial arts). They pretty much take all the good aspects from some MA's and combine them. Thats what I have been taking for nearly a year now and it a very good workout; sparring, groung combat, karate style attacks and even some american boxing.

    -Brian
  • Ten9t6Ten9t6 Member Posts: 691
    stndrd_123 wrote:
    I would suggest you look into places that teach MMA (mixed martial arts). They pretty much take all the good aspects from some MA's and combine them. Thats what I have been taking for nearly a year now and it a very good workout; sparring, groung combat, karate style attacks and even some american boxing.

    -Brian

    I agree...you need a good combination of skills. My family all did Tae Kwon Do growing up. After getting out of the military I did some training at the Lion's Den here in Dallas (Guy Mezger) and then did some Brazilian Jui Jitsu training with Travis Lutter (Winner in UFC 50..knocked out Eastman)....I would have to say that I like the Brazilian Jui Jitsu the best. I like it because in real life, 99.9% of fights go to the ground, and you need to know how to handle yourself when it does. Trust me..it is usually just opposite of what you think you should do......I have been out of it for a while, after moving away from those locations. .....Now I am just fat and lazy....That’s why I carry a Glock. :D
    Kenny

    A+, Network+, Linux+, Security+, MCSE+I, MCSE:Security, MCDBA, CCNP, CCDP, CCSP, CCVP, CCIE Written (R/S, Voice),INFOSEC, JNCIA (M and FWV), JNCIS (M and FWV), ENA, C|EH, ACA, ACS, ACE, CTP, CISSP, SSCP, MCIWD, CIWSA
  • WebmasterWebmaster Admin Posts: 10,292 Admin
    Ricka182 wrote:
    Okay, so what can do with Tai Chi? I see people doing it, but they're just moving very slow, and doing weird body holds with themselves. It may be a martial art, but can it be used for combat or defense specifically?
    I attended a Tai Chi trial lesson once, and in the summer they have sessions in the aprk across the street. I got interested in it seeing a lot of people do it the Lumpini park in Bangkok early in the morning before the smog filled up the air. It can be used for self-defence, especially when you are very advanced. If you watch closely you'll see that every move is part of a shadow fight with an imaginary opponent. Learning how to fight is not the goal though, it's more about concentration, keeping your body flexible, and the spiritual and mental stuff.
  • Orion82698Orion82698 Member Posts: 483
    ooh! Something I can talk on!

    I've been taking martial arts for nearly 21 years now. I've studied some for a very short time, and others for a much longer period. I really do enjoy it, and I wouldn't be me without the training. I also had the chance to do some cool security gigs because of the experience.

    Tae Kwon Do- Good for getting in shape, but as taught in the States, it's often more of a sport than a combat art. It can't hurt though.

    Taijutsu- Under one of the last living legends in Ninjutsu left in the world. I trained under him for 9 years. Tough stuff, very spiritual, and involves the psyche. More of a lifestyle really.

    Shotokan Karate-I found the particular teacher for this one a bit tough for no real reason, but the advanced students were pretty solid. Just wasn't my style, but if you really like getting the crap knocked out of you, it's one of the older styles.

    Kung-fu- We've been fortunate to study the past 5 years in a more traditional style. It's hard, and they expect you to use your mind a lot. The movements can be really akward at first, but it trains those little muscles like nothing else.

    Tai Chi-Goes right along with Kung-fu. Slow, fluid, healthy. It takes an eternity to really get good at it (10 years seems to be the going rate to be considered a worthwhile student...) but it's incredible stuff. I highly recommend doing it if you can. A lot of Kung-Fu and Kenpo schools teach it in addition.

    There are THOUSANDS of styles of Karate and Kung-fu especially. Many families in their respective regions had their own lineage. There are still many that fall into a more broad category, so will call themselves Okinawan Karate or Shao-lin Kung Fu.

    Any other martial art is just as valid so long as the teacher isn't a yutz.

    With that being said, teachers/schools are tough to find. The big chain places that promise you a black belt within a couple of years but charge you a ton of money should be avoided. You aren't learning much besides the art of the empty wallet. A lot of smaller, out of the way things are much better. Often hard to find, they're well worth it no matter the style.

    I would ask for a quiet personal session with a senior teacher if possible. Investigate many schools in your area. Most schools will let you do a few trial lessons before committing, and if they don't, screw them. A good teacher will be testing you as you test them. All schools have some sales aspect to them, but if they come of as used car salesmen, run. Most still require contracts, but asking you to commit to more than 6 months or a year seems outrageous.

    And finally, expect to hurt, a lot, at first. It's amazing what the body adapts to! I love it. Good luck!

    What an excellent write up. Thanks for the info! icon_thumright.gif

    I asked others about studying two different arts. Most people said to wait until reaching BB in one art before starting another. They said it is easier to learn a second if you already know the basics of the first. That way you aren't getting the two mixed up as you learn them.

    As much as I would love to start TKD, I have to agree with you. That would be a lot. Thanks!
    WIP Vacation ;-)

    Porsche..... there is no substitute!
  • splotch69splotch69 Member Posts: 3 ■□□□□□□□□□
    I have been taking karate/tae kwon do, judo, and aikido for five years. Jujitsu is a blend of all three. Judo is ground fighting and throws. It is best to find a master who blends all three together. You should consider why you want to take a martial art, meaning self defense or for fun. It is fun, but keep in mind you can get hurt doing it. I have seen guys break arms, toes, and one guy broke his back. I am now a black belt and I have only had a broken foot, but that did not prevent me from training or working.
    newbie
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