Not worried about the certification but training material for RedHat 5.5 or 6

N2ITN2IT Posts: 7,483Inactive Imported Users
I recently took a new position at a new company. We are going to be deploying several 100 machines with Red Hat 5.5 and moving to Red Hat 6. I will be receiving a fully depreciated machine ;) with either 5.5 or 6 on it. Is there a particular book out there that is recommended? My boss has given me the green light to get "ramped" up.

What's really exciting is I have an enterprise account, so I can call Red Hat directly if I have any questions and their experts should be able to assist.

I am really just looking for one resource to start off with. I won't need to be an expert, but as the supervisor I will need to be able to train the techs on our deployment and data migration process. There is one in place, sort of, but I would like to obtain additional knowledge so I can have the Linux knowledge to offer not only a high overview, but to attack processes from a technical level as well.

Thanks for any advice.

Comments

  • brownwrapbrownwrap Posts: 549Member
    N2IT wrote: »
    I recently took a new position at a new company. We are going to be deploying several 100 machines with Red Hat 5.5 and moving to Red Hat 6. I will be receiving a fully depreciated machine ;) with either 5.5 or 6 on it. Is there a particular book out there that is recommended? My boss has given me the green light to get "ramped" up.

    What's really exciting is I have an enterprise account, so I can call Red Hat directly if I have any questions and their experts should be able to assist.

    I am really just looking for one resource to start off with. I won't need to be an expert, but as the supervisor I will need to be able to train the techs on our deployment and data migration process. There is one in place, sort of, but I would like to obtain additional knowledge so I can have the Linux knowledge to offer not only a high overview, but to attack processes from a technical level as well.

    Thanks for any advice.

    But if I were deploying a 100 machines, I get a kickstart server set up. If you are familiar with Solaris, it would be similar to jumpstart. Checkout cobbler, it is a RedHat supported project. You could start up by sitting up one machine, and then concetrating on cloning another.
  • UnixGuyUnixGuy SABSA, GCFA, GPEN, CISM, RHCE, Security+, Server+, eJPT, CCNA Posts: 3,986Mod Mod
    The best resource is RedHat's official training material..there's also Michael Jang book, and CompTIA Linux+ books.


    The web is full of tutorials/example, you can always Google any topic for examples/explanation.
    Goal: MBA, March 2020
  • /pub/beer//pub/beer/ Posts: 67Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    Kickstart rocks. Your environment might lend itself to network installations, but I just find it easier with my USB Kickstart setup. I have a 2 partition USB drive that boots and starts the linux install referencing the kickstart file. The hardest part was figuring out the drive lettering at the various steps.

    I have the kickstart setup to install what I need, partition according to our security policies, assign the proper IP, etc. My post script restarts networking, does a yum update, and runs various scripts. Depending on how many updates there are I can deploy a new xeon base web server in 7-8 minutes.
    Certification Goal:
    - ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
  • N2ITN2IT Posts: 7,483Inactive Imported Users
    /pub/beer/ wrote: »
    Kickstart rocks. Your environment might lend itself to network installations, but I just find it easier with my USB Kickstart setup. I have a 2 partition USB drive that boots and starts the linux install referencing the kickstart file. The hardest part was figuring out the drive lettering at the various steps.

    I have the kickstart setup to install what I need, partition according to our security policies, assign the proper IP, etc. My post script restarts networking, does a yum update, and runs various scripts. Depending on how many updates there are I can deploy a new xeon base web server in 7-8 minutes.

    Hey guys thanks for the heads up, unfortantly I believe they are going to set up a network install. It looks like command line to get it started will be ran out of Samba.

    The tech is pretty nice and has a lot of patience so I should be able to pick this up pretty quickly



    I did grab a linux + book from Amazon. I'll go through this as well.

    The problem is I am on this project and I am trying to nail down the deliverables and activities and doesn't give me much time for any of the operational processes at the moment.
  • brownwrapbrownwrap Posts: 549Member
    N2IT wrote: »
    Hey guys thanks for the heads up, unfortantly I believe they are going to set up a network install. It looks like command line to get it started will be ran out of Samba.

    The tech is pretty nice and has a lot of patience so I should be able to pick this up pretty quickly



    I did grab a linux + book from Amazon. I'll go through this as well.

    The problem is I am on this project and I am trying to nail down the deliverables and activities and doesn't give me much time for any of the operational processes at the moment.


    Kickstart is a network install.
  • /pub/beer//pub/beer/ Posts: 67Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    brownwrap wrote: »
    Kickstart is a network install.

    Kickstart is just the automated install config file, you tell it where to grab from. You can grab from a network location or physical media. There are types of network installs that work more like a network boot. The number of machines that you are provisioning and your network setup will determine if that setup is worth it or not.
    Certification Goal:
    - ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
  • brownwrapbrownwrap Posts: 549Member
    /pub/beer/ wrote: »
    Kickstart is just the automated install config file, you tell it where to grab from. You can grab from a network location or physical media. There are types of network installs that work more like a network boot. The number of machines that you are provisioning and your network setup will determine if that setup is worth it or not.

    I forget how many machines we had altogether, approximately 80. When We ran a kickstart, it loaded the OS, configured the machine, and patched it. It was a patched vanilla machine when finished. All of the home directories were NFS mounted, as well as /usr/local. If it was a webserver, that unique stuff was kept on a NetApps NAS.

    So if a machine crashed, we could re-kickstart it and have it up again in an hour. Backups were done nightly, so that could be restored pretty quickly as well, since backups were online.
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