InfoSec Carriers - SANS News Bites

rwmidlrwmidl CISSP, CISM, MCSE, MCSA, MCPxAlotWorldwide AvailabilityMember Posts: 807 ■■■■■■□□□□
From today's SANS Newsbites:

SANS Newsbites Vol.13 Num.25

--Raytheon, SAIC Vie With U.S. in 'Fratricide' Over Cyberworkers Bloomberg Government's Eric Engleman publishes an analysis of the economic effects of the shortage of technical cybersecurity workers that was first illuminated by the Center for Strategic and International Studies in its December 2010 report: "A Crisis in Cyber Manpower:
Technical Proficiency Matters." Bloomberg's new article documents how technology companies such as Booz Allen, Raytheon, and SAIC are competing with each other and the U.S. government for hard-to-find cybersecurity workers, driving up salary costs and spurring corporate acquisitions. "When you have a limited supply of people and a huge demand, salaries go up and people can shop around, and that's fantastic for them but it creates inflation in this area that's not particularly healthy for business," a former DNI associate director now at one of the technology companies told the Bloomberg reporters. Overall 10,000 to 30,000 more technical security people are needed to meet the national need reports Bloomberg. Salaries of the top guns of security, the "hunters and tool builders," have risen as high as $175,000, and companies such as Raytheon are using acquisitions to buy smaller companies in which they pick up 100 to 200 technical cybersecurity workers each time.
This article is available through Bloomberg Government to their subscribers.
[Editor's Note (Paller): Interviews with hiring managers at the companies listed in the article help explain exactly who those 10-30,000 people are. At the same time technology companies are fighting for the most technical security experts, they are reducing the number of information security compliance people. One hiring manager reported that his organization is eliminating the jobs of 250 people engaged in certification and accreditation (C&A) but he expects 15%-30% of them will be able to build a new career by mastering the hands-on technical security skills that are in high demand.]
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Comments

  • veritas_libertasveritas_libertas CISSP, GIAC x5, CompTIA x5 Greenville, SC USAMember Posts: 5,735 ■■■■■■■■■■
    rwmidl wrote: »
    From today's SANS Newsbites:

    SANS Newsbites Vol.13 Num.25

    --Raytheon, SAIC Vie With U.S. in 'Fratricide' Over Cyberworkers Bloomberg Government's Eric Engleman publishes an analysis of the economic effects of the shortage of technical cybersecurity workers that was first illuminated by the Center for Strategic and International Studies in its December 2010 report: "A Crisis in Cyber Manpower:
    Technical Proficiency Matters." Bloomberg's new article documents how technology companies such as Booz Allen, Raytheon, and SAIC are competing with each other and the U.S. government for hard-to-find cybersecurity workers, driving up salary costs and spurring corporate acquisitions. "When you have a limited supply of people and a huge demand, salaries go up and people can shop around, and that's fantastic for them but it creates inflation in this area that's not particularly healthy for business," a former DNI associate director now at one of the technology companies told the Bloomberg reporters. Overall 10,000 to 30,000 more technical security people are needed to meet the national need reports Bloomberg. Salaries of the top guns of security, the "hunters and tool builders," have risen as high as $175,000, and companies such as Raytheon are using acquisitions to buy smaller companies in which they pick up 100 to 200 technical cybersecurity workers each time.
    This article is available through Bloomberg Government to their subscribers.
    [Editor's Note (Paller): Interviews with hiring managers at the companies listed in the article help explain exactly who those 10-30,000 people are. At the same time technology companies are fighting for the most technical security experts, they are reducing the number of information security compliance people. One hiring manager reported that his organization is eliminating the jobs of 250 people engaged in certification and accreditation (C&A) but he expects 15%-30% of them will be able to build a new career by mastering the hands-on technical security skills that are in high demand.]

    I found this part very interesting.
    Currently working on: Linux and Python
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