Is it worth to get MCSE:2003 in 2011?

theitprotheitpro Member Posts: 37 ■■□□□□□□□□
Trying to advance my career, but worth it?

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  • powerfoolpowerfool Senior Member Member Posts: 1,647 ■■■■■■■■□□
    There is certainly some value left. How much? That's anyone guess. Will you be working with Windows Server 2003 for a while? If so, there is some value. Also, the MCSE is still well known, so there is some value in achieving the certification before it is no longer an option. I believe that building a history of certifications can help prove your long-term dedication as well. Remember, you will be able to upgrade to the MCITP Enterprise Administrator, as well. In addition, if you aren't going for any specializations, the Windows 7 exam that you will need for the MCITP EA can also count as your MCSE elective. So, playing your cards right, you could do the entire thing in nine exams. Plus, if you already have experience in Windows Server 2003, you may be able to knock them out in short order.

    At the end of the day, the decision is yours.
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  • theitprotheitpro Member Posts: 37 ■■□□□□□□□□
    The thing is, I'm not working with Windows 2003. If I were, I would definitely pursue it. I'm currently doing desktop support. Any tips?:)
  • -Foxer--Foxer- Member Posts: 151
    People bring this up every few weeks it seems like. You could search for the other threads on it.

    Personally, I don't think you should do it. It makes more sense to me to pursue the MCITP:SA, or MCITP:EA. More and more businesses are moving to 2008, and they are looking for people certified in it.
  • Dr ITDr IT Member Posts: 351 ■■■■□□□□□□
    Desktop Support to Server Admin is a logical move

    so you might go ahead with your MCSE ( as it is still highly regarded )icon_thumright.gif
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  • kiki162kiki162 Member Posts: 635
    I think starting in April 2011, they are putting retirement dates on certifications. Normally it falls within the lifecycle of the product, so whenever the product support goes, then the certs aren't too far behind.

    Take a look at this link

    Microsoft Certification exams | IT Certification | Exam Preparation FAQ

    As far as getting it, well if you are already working on it (like a couple of exams passed) but not quite there, then I would say finish it up.

    If you haven't started, personally I would spend time working on your 08 and W7 certs to keep up with the "times".

    Another thing you want to look at is the types of jobs in your area. Although many places are still putting MCSE on their job postings, you might wanna pay attention to those with Windows Server 2008 on them. Those would be your MCTS and MCITP certs.

    One last thought, the next release of Windows Server is coming next year sometime, and certs will probably in beta not too long after that.
  • Dakinggamer87Dakinggamer87 Gaming Tech Expert Silicon Valley, CAMember Posts: 4,016 ■■■■■■■■□□
    I think the MCSE is still worth it as it still has value in the job market and Server 2003 has support till 2015 so you can always upgrade to MCITP later down the road. I plan on finishing it by July/August since I've already completed several exams. If you are just now starting out then I would start with MCITP with Server 2008.
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  • powerfoolpowerfool Senior Member Member Posts: 1,647 ■■■■■■■■□□
    kiki162 wrote: »
    I think starting in April 2011, they are putting retirement dates on certifications. Normally it falls within the lifecycle of the product, so whenever the product support goes, then the certs aren't too far behind.

    The only exams that have retired are the Exchange 2003 exams as it is two versions out of day (with Exchange 2007 and 2010 being available). The MCSE 2003 will likely be pursuable (not really a word) until about the time that the next version of Windows Server has exams available (and they will announce it six months ahead of time).
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  • RomBUSRomBUS Member Posts: 699 ■■■■□□□□□□
    I have one more test! I have to finish it! If you're in the same position as I am I say you must complete it. And no MCSE is long from dead IMO
  • FixOSGuyFixOSGuy Member Posts: 11 ■□□□□□□□□□
    I know many people who advanced from Desktop to Server without it at 3 different companies.

    Mostly the key was knowing the right people and projecting the right image. Social and soft skills go a very long way.

    I would say for your case focus more on your problem solving and scripting skills. Server support is mostly either building or fixing OSes. Very few guys get thrown into AD design unless its a small shop.

    MCSE are great for those looking for a break in a new company and its just another item point.
  • JapFreak786JapFreak786 Member Posts: 27 ■□□□□□□□□□
    i'm about 70% through on Server '03,going to finish it and try get my MCSA,got 70-270 already,and i'm going to be taking the Window's 7 exam and Exchange '03 to just finish my MCSA off..
    Got time off this week from work,so my goal is to finish,and sit my Server '03 exam this week,and then get cracking on with Window's 7 as my current employer is moving to that OS in the next 3 month's.

    IMO - if your not far from finishing,then finish it off,i'm going down the CCN route once i've done my MCSA,and i've also been given free ITIL training and exam for when i'm ready for it,so my "study" time is limited at the moment
  • PovilasPovilas Member Posts: 77 ■■■□□□□□□□
    i'm about 70% through on Server '03,going to finish it and try get my MCSA,got 70-270 already,and i'm going to be taking the Window's 7 exam and Exchange '03 to just finish my MCSA off..

    I believe that Exchange '03 exams are retired.

    About main question: is it worth? I think it is if you are familiar with Windows 2003 and can take all exams in 6 months or sooner, otherwise better go with Windows Server 2008 certification.
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  • powerfoolpowerfool Senior Member Member Posts: 1,647 ■■■■■■■■□□
    Povilas wrote: »
    I believe that Exchange '03 exams are retired.

    About main question: is it worth? I think it is if you are familiar with Windows 2003 and can take all exams in 6 months or sooner, otherwise better go with Windows Server 2008 certification.

    That probably makes the most since for folks. If you are extremely familiar with Windows Server 2003, you should be able to knock out the exams in relatively short order, especially if you are already familiar with Microsoft exams.

    And, yes, the Exchange 2003 exams have indeed retired, as of March 31, 2011.
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  • blargoeblargoe Self-Described Huguenot NC, USAMember Posts: 4,172 ■■■■■■■■■□
    Unless you're already proficient in 2003 and want to certify as such, I wouldn't bother certifying in 2003 at this point... IMO.
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  • fly2dwfly2dw Member Posts: 122 ■■■□□□□□□□
    A lot of people ask this question and I advise people, by all means study the MCSE material, but use it more as background reading (and reinforcement) if you are not going to support server 2003. I think there is still credibility in getting an MCSE if you support server 2003 for obvious reasons.

    There is a lot of good material out there for the MCSE and the practises are very relevant in the majority of Microsoft infrastructure networks today even if they are configured with server 2008.

    However the fact is server 2008 is here and has been for a while. It is awesome to learn where server 2008 came from, and I really do encourage time spent learning server 2003, but if you are not supporting server 2003 as I said before I wouldn't pursue the MCSE certification track. I would start working towards an MCITP:SA or MCITP:EA on server 2008.

    On a side note I am going to say I wouldn't like to be starting out on server 2008 with no prior knowledge of server 2003. Other MCSE's may understand my point here. I am really glad I have that knowledge, as I believe my MCSE studying embedded a lot of "Under the hood" so to speak understanding for me on how things work within an Microsoft infrastructure. It has enabled me to study server 2008 with a lot of clarity, and a lot more appreciation, for the changes that have been made.

    Best of luck with your studying!
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