When should you leave off certain certifications off your resume?

N2ITN2IT Posts: 7,483Inactive Imported Users
As you can see my certifications on the left under the cert column. Well, some are technicial and some are more process driven. Moving forward should I leave the CompTIA's off the resume and just list the process based ones? Being in more of a managerial position and not really performing any technical work does it benefit me to list those on Linkedin and on my resume?

Opinion or thoughts?

Comments

  • hiddenknight821hiddenknight821 Posts: 1,209Member ■■■■■□□□□□
    N2IT wrote: »
    As you can see my certifications on the left under the cert column. Well, some are technicial and some are more process driven. Moving forward should I leave the CompTIA's off the resume and just list the process based ones? Being in more of a managerial position and not really performing any technical work does it benefit me to list those on Linkedin and on my resume?

    Opinion or thoughts?


    I read somewhere here that people should not list CCENT or CCNA if they have a CCNA in one of the specialities. I wish I can find that thread, but it was a while ago, and I'm too lazy to look for it at the moment icon_lol.gif.
  • RobertKaucherRobertKaucher Posts: 4,298Member
    As a general rule of thumb I would say list all on sites like LinkedIn, Monster, Dice, etc. But only list those you believe add value to the specific job in question on your resume. Resumes should be directed either to a certain type of role or a specific position at a specific company. When you do that you slim things down and save the person evaluating the resume some time.
  • N2ITN2IT Posts: 7,483Inactive Imported Users
    As a general rule of thumb I would say list all on sites like LinkedIn, Monster, Dice, etc. But only list those you believe add value to the specific job in question on your resume. Resumes should be directed either to a certain type of role or a specific position at a specific company. When you do that you slim things down and save the person evaluating the resume some time.


    I can buy into this theory. I'm sold, thanks for taking the time to write that out.

    -N2
  • SteveO86SteveO86 Posts: 1,423Member
    As a general rule of thumb I would say list all on sites like LinkedIn, Monster, Dice, etc. But only list those you believe add value to the specific job in question on your resume. Resumes should be directed either to a certain type of role or a specific position at a specific company. When you do that you slim things down and save the person evaluating the resume some time.

    icon_thumright.gif Perfect answer right there!
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  • rogue2shadowrogue2shadow CISSP, GXPN, OSCE, OSCP, OSWP, eMAPT, CEH, CNDA, A+, Network+, Security+ Posts: 1,501Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    I read somewhere here that people should not list CCENT or CCNA if they have a CCNA in one of the specialities. I wish I can find that thread, but it was a while ago, and I'm too lazy to look for it at the moment icon_lol.gif.

    I agree except with the specialty. I think just about all tracks require a CCNA to jump to *NP or specialty but not all HR goons may know this (as usual icon_rolleyes.gif). I think just before 2007 you could jump directly to CCNA Security without CCNA. I would personally list both.
    As a general rule of thumb I would say list all on sites like LinkedIn, Monster, Dice, etc. But only list those you believe add value to the specific job in question on your resume. Resumes should be directed either to a certain type of role or a specific position at a specific company. When you do that you slim things down and save the person evaluating the resume some time.

    +1. Makes things look cleaner and the pre-requisites are assumed (aka if you list CCIE it'll be assumed you either have a CCNA, or a CCNA and a CCNP/CCNP Specialty).

  • earweedearweed Posts: 5,192Member ■■■■■■■■■□
    As a general rule of thumb I would say list all on sites like LinkedIn, Monster, Dice, etc. But only list those you believe add value to the specific job in question on your resume. Resumes should be directed either to a certain type of role or a specific position at a specific company. When you do that you slim things down and save the person evaluating the resume some time.
    +1 for this. Well put.
    No longer work in IT. Play around with stuff sometimes still and fix stuff for friends and relatives.
  • nicklauscombsnicklauscombs Posts: 885Member
    but not all HR goons may know this (as usual icon_rolleyes.gif).

    exactly, i would always list my ccna, ccna: security as well as ccnp on a resume for this reason.
    WIP: IPS exam
  • mikej412mikej412 Posts: 10,090Member
    Leave the certifications off your resume when they no longer have any value for the positions you are seeking -- or you don't want to have to answer questions related to the tasks/topics the certification imply you should be able to answer.

    The CompTIA certs might be good for a couple more years to show your techie roots -- as long as you still have room on your resume to fill. But once you have have more impressive work experience, drop the low end stuff to keep your resume slim and trim.
    :mike: Cisco Certifications -- Collect the Entire Set!
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