Help Desk Engineer position

Alhaji265Alhaji265 Member Posts: 203 ■■■□□□□□□□
Hello All,

I started working as an Help Desk Engineer at an private equity company. This is an entry-level position I got soon after I finished school. What advice do I need to stand out to the upper management?

Comments

  • higherhohigherho Member Posts: 882
    Work very hard and complete all your tasks. If you have time take on more tasks and show that you can do more work and that you are competent.

    Always ask questions to your superiors about their jobs / tasks. Take an interest in it and learn from them. Master all your current responsibilities and grow (by studies, certs, education, interest in growing within the company , etc).

    Have a good attitude and personality. This counts for a lot more than what people think.


    Also I would not get to personal with everyone right away. Keep personal opinions about Court cases, Politics, Religion, to your self. This stuff just creates a bad atmosphere without you even knowing it.
  • phantasmphantasm Member Posts: 995
    higherho wrote: »
    Also I would not get to personal with everyone right away. Keep personal opinions about Court cases, Politics, Religion, to your self. This stuff just creates a bad atmosphere sometime without you even knowing it.

    Words to live by. Not only will it help you in your professional life but it will do so for your personal life as well.
    "No man ever steps in the same river twice, for it's not the same river and he's not the same man." -Heraclitus
  • Alhaji265Alhaji265 Member Posts: 203 ■■■□□□□□□□
    Will keep that in mind. Thanks.
  • instant000instant000 Member Posts: 1,745
    higherho wrote: »
    also i would not get to personal with everyone right away. Keep personal opinions about court cases, politics, religion, to your self. This stuff just creates a bad atmosphere sometime without you even knowing it.

    + rep...
    Currently Working: CCIE R&S
    LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/lewislampkin (Please connect: Just say you're from TechExams.Net!)
  • Alhaji265Alhaji265 Member Posts: 203 ■■■□□□□□□□
    How should I go about networking with upper management? I often bump into my CTO, CFO and the CEO at work.
  • xxxooxxxxxxooxxx Member Posts: 19 ■□□□□□□□□□
    Once you close a ticket. Call the person back in a day or two to follow up and ask if everything works fine and if they are satisfied with you work. I find people really appreciate this and many would share the positive experience with you bosses.


    By the way, as a graduate from a tough, accredited Engineering program. I have some problem with your job title (I know it is not you that came up with it).

    Help Desk has nothing to do with engineering...

    Similar to how some Salesmens has the title Sales Engineer...
  • shodownshodown Member Posts: 2,271
    +1 on the politics and religion until you know the people you can talk about it. One of my good friends was very conservative, and we generally disagreed with everything regarding politics and the economy, and even though he was fine it, we had to go to the smoke break away from the sensitive ears of others
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  • jahsouljahsoul Member Posts: 453
    Funny thing is, I work on an Air Force base and they always talk about not talking about it. We have regular debates in my shop. Like shodown said, it's all in knowing who you work with.

    My only rule of engagement is something I got from blackrouter. In a post, he said that he aims to do what others won't. Your work ethic, attitude, and ambition speaks volumes.

    [backstory] I worked help desk for 3 months with no prior experience (well, working experience) and was promoted twice. Left there to work for another company where I was supposed to be a network technician but in reality, I was just desktop support. I left there in 6 months because it was no room for growth and I reached a ceiling in 2 months at my position. I didn't learn anything new (actually, I was the one being sent out when there was a network issue). I was working on getting my CCNA while everyone else was too busy being complacent. I left their to take my current position as a Jr. Network Engineer. [/backstory]

    Never limit yourself. It may be people in your office who has been in the same position for years and might try to crap on your ambition (that happened when I worked help desk). Ignore them. In this field, we are captain of our fate. Your rise and fall ultimately lies on you.
    Reading: What ever is on my desk that day :study:
  • cxzar20cxzar20 Member Posts: 168
    jahsoul wrote: »
    Funny thing is, I work on an Air Force base and they always talk about not talking about it. We have regular debates in my shop. Like shodown said, it's all in knowing who you work with.

    My only rule of engagement is something I got from blackrouter. In a post, he said that he aims to do what others won't. Your work ethic, attitude, and ambition speaks volumes.

    [backstory] I worked help desk for 3 months with no prior experience (well, working experience) and was promoted twice. Left there to work for another company where I was supposed to be a network technician but in reality, I was just desktop support. I left there in 6 months because it was no room for growth and I reached a ceiling in 2 months at my position. I didn't learn anything new (actually, I was the one being sent out when there was a network issue). I was working on getting my CCNA while everyone else was too busy being complacent. I left their to take my current position as a Jr. Network Engineer. [/backstory]

    Never limit yourself. It may be people in your office who has been in the same position for years and might try to crap on your ambition (that happened when I worked help desk). Ignore them. In this field, we are captain of our fate. Your rise and fall ultimately lies on you.

    This is very good advice. I was promoted quickly due to my willingness to take whatever tickets came across no matter how mundane or complex they were. Don't be afraid to take challenging tickets, but at the same time make sure it is something you could figure out in a timely manner if its an urgent issue. Also don't be afraid of asking questions. This helped me to spend only a few months in the NOC before being promoted into engineering.
  • MrRyteMrRyte Member Posts: 347 ■■■■□□□□□□
    Alhaji265 wrote: »
    How should I go about networking with upper management? I often bump into my CTO, CFO and the CEO at work.
    DON'T network with them unless they invite you (high-level execs can sniff out overeager brown-nosers.) Make them see an employee always looking for a coworker to help or a problem to solve. And feedback regarding your aptitude & attitude will eventually find its way upwards-whether good or bad.
    NEXT UP: CompTIA Security+ :study:

    Life is a matter of choice not chance. The path to your destiny will be paved by the decisions that you make every day.
  • btlegacybtlegacy Member Posts: 11 ■□□□□□□□□□
    I agree with this comment and many times when I have been recommended for a promotion or raise it came as a result of my peers stating to my superiors how I helped the solve challenging problems or assisted on projects
    MrRyte wrote: »
    DON'T network with them unless they invite you (high-level execs can sniff out overeager brown-nosers.) Make them see an employee always looking for a coworker to help or a problem to solve. And feedback regarding your aptitude & attitude will eventually find its way upwards-whether good or bad.
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