Inferiority complex among community college students - MLIVE

veritas_libertasveritas_libertas CISSP, GIAC x5, CompTIA x5Greenville, SC USAMember Posts: 5,746 ■■■■■■■■■■
This is an excellent article on the financial benefits of attending community colleges.
At a store this week, a clerk mentioned she was a high school senior and I asked about her plans for the fall. Community college, she said, with more than a hint of apology.

It’s not an unusual response among community college students, who definitely have an inferiority complex among the college-student crowd.

It drives me crazy.

If you ask me, the biggest problem with community college is the image. There’s a perception that community college is for kids who can’t hack a four-year school. And then there’s the reality: Community college offers some real academic and financial advantages, and there is nothing to apologize for.

Column: Inferiority complex among community college students disguises schools' value in higher education | MLive.com

Comments

  • Bl8ckr0uterBl8ckr0uter Inactive Imported Users Posts: 5,031 ■■■■■■■■□□
    Very good article. +Rep


    *blkrtr goes to a community college*
  • Mr.RitzMr.Ritz Member Posts: 25 ■□□□□□□□□□
    This is an excellent article on the financial benefits of attending community colleges.



    Column: Inferiority complex among community college students disguises schools' value in higher education | MLive.com

    I got my degree my AA with plans to transfer to a university. I totally catch **** for going to community college.
  • VAHokie56VAHokie56 Member Posts: 783
    I had a good friend say the same thing about CC classes being more demanding. He completed a year at a local community college here in Richmond then transferred to Virginia Tech and stated the university classes where a cake walk in comparison.


    By the way that doesn't mean VT is a poor University :D GO HOKIES
    .ιlι..ιlι.
    CISCO
    "A flute without holes, is not a flute. A donut without a hole, is a Danish" - Ty Webb
    Reading:NX-OS and Cisco Nexus Switching: Next-Generation Data Center Architectures
  • MrRyteMrRyte Member Posts: 347 ■■■■□□□□□□
    Why would or should it matter how a person gets their education? It's not the name of the institution of "higher learning" but the student his/herself that will determine the quality of education that they receive.
    I took Cisco classes at a community college because it was so close to home. The instructors were friendly and helpful, and the cost was indeed much cheaper than the four-year state university. But I still had to put in the effort to ensure that I got something out of the classes.

    In the end, the question is "do you have the competency to do the job that we're interviewing for". The name of whatever college/university you go to should mean little to the interviewer.icon_rolleyes.gif
    NEXT UP: CompTIA Security+ :study:

    Life is a matter of choice not chance. The path to your destiny will be paved by the decisions that you make every day.
  • VAHokie56VAHokie56 Member Posts: 783
    MrRyte wrote: »
    Why would or should it matter how a person gets their education? It's not the name of the institution of "higher learning" but the student his/herself that will determine the quality of education that they receive.


    While this is a great outlook to have on the issue, sadly some hiring managers or HR reps DO look at where you got your degree. They may not throw you out because you went to a lesser known school BUT they may choose the guy or gal who graduated from Harvard because the school holds a higher distinction. I am not saying it is right but it is the way of the world. However I like to think in the IT realm above any other career field those same people will look at certs and experience with more relevancy than where a candidate went to school.
    .ιlι..ιlι.
    CISCO
    "A flute without holes, is not a flute. A donut without a hole, is a Danish" - Ty Webb
    Reading:NX-OS and Cisco Nexus Switching: Next-Generation Data Center Architectures
  • ZartanasaurusZartanasaurus Member Posts: 2,008 ■■■■■■■■■□
    I think a 2 year college makes sense for most people who want a bachelor's. Gen Ed requirements are a cash generating business for universities. Knock all that stuff out at $200/credit at your local community college then transfer. When I went to CC, my Physics class was taught by a prof at the nearby 4-year university. Same book too. And an A there was worth 4.0 just like an A at the 4-year university.

    Plus if you wash out at the junior college, you just saved yourself a $20K lesson.
    Currently reading:
    IPSec VPN Design 44%
    Mastering VMWare vSphere 5​ 42.8%
  • ZartanasaurusZartanasaurus Member Posts: 2,008 ■■■■■■■■■□
    I agree that the perception that going to a CC is a negative one, especially among the AP/fast-track students. It's pumped into your head constantly starting in junior high how important getting into a good college is.
    Currently reading:
    IPSec VPN Design 44%
    Mastering VMWare vSphere 5​ 42.8%
  • MentholMooseMentholMoose Senior Member Member Posts: 1,525 ■■■■■■■■□□
    Community college is greatly underrated. Many have transfer agreements with great universities, so as long as you maintain a decent GPA you are guaranteed acceptance (I know a ton of people who got into UCLA and other UC schools by transferring from "lowly" community colleges). Guess what? NOBODY will care that you did two years at a community college once your resume says "UCLA".

    If you're really thinking you will be irreparably harmed by attending a community college, go to a (still fairly cheap) state school for a couple years and transfer to a "better" school. This is harder since you will have a lower priority than community college students with guaranteed acceptance, but it's still possible (I know many people who did this as well).
    MentholMoose
    MCSA 2003, LFCS, LFCE (expired), VCP6-DCV
  • TurgonTurgon Banned Posts: 6,308 ■■■■■■■■■□
    VAHokie56 wrote: »
    While this is a great outlook to have on the issue, sadly some hiring managers or HR reps DO look at where you got your degree. They may not throw you out because you went to a lesser known school BUT they may choose the guy or gal who graduated from Harvard because the school holds a higher distinction. I am not saying it is right but it is the way of the world. However I like to think in the IT realm above any other career field those same people will look at certs and experience with more relevancy than where a candidate went to school.

    Having Oxford University on your CV will always impress people. You might have left with the worst possible degree and been the biggest waster on campus but you were there. Admission criteria is stringent and just being there gives you access to a range of people that in and of itself is valuable experience any future employer will covet. Similarly you received an Oxbridge education and regardless of how hopeless you may have been academically, the exposure you get in class will change you in ways that make you employable.

    If you are looking for senior role with a large organisation the aegis of the University you attended with help you, not least as so many people in senior roles either studied at similar places or like to hang out with people that did so the star dust rubs off.

    I was lucky enough to spend 6 weeks doing a piece of work living at Cambridge University in 2005 to complete a degree that was actually awarded by a different University and I can tell you that the aspirations of the people I met were very different from my postgraduate peers from the regular University I was from. Engineers make the world work, but Oxbridge/Ivy League graduates run the world. Having a degree from the best University you can squirrel yourself into will never hurt your chances.

    On the flipside this is still a career where you can prosper without high flying academic credentials.
  • tpatt100tpatt100 Member Posts: 2,991 ■■■■■■■■■□
    I know for myself it seems to be an age thing. I did look down on CC when I was younger but when I got older I realized how great my local CC was. Their computer classes were more up to date since they could adapt to change easier.
  • jdancerjdancer Member Posts: 482 ■■■■□□□□□□
    Too bad CC's get a bad rap. Just make sure you chose a CC that you can transfer credits to a 4-year institution.

    I mostly tested out most CC stuff by taking the CLEP exam. Those classes which a CLEP exam was not available, I took the CC class.

    Some CC classes are way better than some 4-year classes.
  • jonenojoneno Member Posts: 257 ■■■■□□□□□□
    Turgon wrote: »
    Having Oxford University on your CV will always impress people. You might have left with the worst possible degree and been the biggest waster on campus but you were there. Admission criteria is stringent and just being there gives you access to a range of people that in and of itself is valuable experience any future employer will covet. Similarly you received an Oxbridge education and regardless of how hopeless you may have been academically, the exposure you get in class will change you in ways that make you employable.

    If you are looking for senior role with a large organisation the aegis of the University you attended with help you, not least as so many people in senior roles either studied at similar places or like to hang out with people that did so the star dust rubs off.

    I was lucky enough to spend 6 weeks doing a piece of work living at Cambridge University in 2005 to complete a degree that was actually awarded by a different University and I can tell you that the aspirations of the people I met were very different from my postgraduate peers from the regular University I was from. Engineers make the world work, but Oxbridge/Ivy League graduates run the world. Having a degree from the best University you can squirrel yourself into will never hurt your chances.

    On the flipside this is still a career where you can prosper without high flying academic credentials.

    True statement!!! As crazy as it sounds, my in-law graduated from a college in canada, then took a loan for $80k to attend HBS. I thought he was dumb, but he graduated with a job while in harvard. His bonus last year was my take home salary.
  • SlowhandSlowhand MCSE: Cloud Platform and Infrastructure / Core Infrastructure, MCSA: Windows Server 2003/2012/2016 Bay Area, CaliforniaMod Posts: 5,161 Mod
    I think one important thing to remember is that, even if you go to a community college now, if you transfer to a four-year institution you're going to be telling people you graduated from the higher-level school anyway. Once I make the jump to and finish up in the UC system, I'll be (hopefully) telling people that I graduated from UC Berkeley, I won't really have any need to mention where I went to community college.

    It's kind of like how you don't necessarily get judged on the quality of your high school once you've graduated college. The same can be said for someone who goes to a well-known school for graduate work, if they graduate with a Master's or PhD from a high-profile school no one will really judge them for where they went beforehand to earn their Bachelor's.

    Free Microsoft Training: Microsoft Learn
    Free PowerShell Resources: Top PowerShell Blogs
    Free DevOps/Azure Resources: Visual Studio Dev Essentials

    Let it never be said that I didn't do the very least I could do.
  • Cisco InfernoCisco Inferno Member Posts: 1,034 ■■■■■■□□□□
    i also wish to mention that MANY 4yr universities and colleges have Articulation agreements with surrounding CC's. Meaning an A.S in Comp Sci from 'abc' Community college has a full seamless transfer to the B.S. in Comp Sci from 'xyz' University. You enter as a Junior.
    2019 Goals
    CompTIA Linux+
    [ ] Bachelor's Degree
  • WafflesAndRootbeerWafflesAndRootbeer Member Posts: 555
    i also wish to mention that MANY 4yr universities and colleges have Articulation agreements with surrounding CC's. Meaning an A.S in Comp Sci from 'abc' Community college has a full seamless transfer to the B.S. in Comp Sci from 'xyz' University. You enter as a Junior.

    Indeed. That is how I got into a college that had rejected me as a potential Freshman. icon_thumright.gif
  • AmcoAmco Member Posts: 73 ■■□□□□□□□□
    I went to cc before heading to the university, it was a blessing in disguise as some of friends who went straight to the university, failed out and never returned back to school. icon_thumright.gif
  • headshotheadshot Member Posts: 77 ■■□□□□□□□□
    Around here in Canada the 3 year CC computer systems/networking technology diploma program is actually held in higher regard than a comp sci degree, except if it's from an elite school like U of T. Our technology colleges are actually pretty good for technical jobs.
  • drew726drew726 Member Posts: 237
    If I didn't go to community college before an University, I would have so much debt right now.
    Completed Courses:
    SSC1, SST1, AXV1, TTV1, ABV1, TNV1, AHV1, BAC1, BBC1, LAE1, LUT1, GAC1, IWC1, INC1, HHT1, LAT1, QLT1, CLC1, IWT1 TPV1, INT1, TSV1, LET1, BOV1, AJV1, ORC1, MGC1, BRV1, AIV1, WFV1, TWA1, CPW2
    Incompleted Courses:
    nothing :)
  • citinerdcitinerd Member Posts: 266
    I took a lot of crap from my university friends. I waited until 25 to attend community college. Took me 4 years to get a AAS in networking while working full time, but look at my sig and check out how many classes were waived for WGU. That and I have zero debt thanks to the wonderful tuition reimbursement I had from working my full time job.
  • PsoasmanPsoasman Senior Member Member Posts: 2,687 ■■■■■■■■■□
    Guess what? NOBODY will care that you did two years at a community college once your resume says "UCLA".

    Exactly. I went to a local CC to get my AAS. $80/credit. I could have gone to the local University and pay over $300/credit. The money I save will allow me to go to WGU next year.
  • alan2308alan2308 CISSP, MCSA 2008, MCSA 2012, CCNA R&S, CCNA Security Ann Arbor, MIMember Posts: 1,854 ■■■■■■■■□□
    CC's are great. Since my wife works at one and I get free tuition, I've racked up over 140 credit hours there. icon_mrgreen.gif
  • rogue2shadowrogue2shadow CISSP, GXPN, OSCE, OSCP, OSWP, eMAPT, CEH, CNDA, A+, Network+, Security+ Member Posts: 1,501 ■■■■■■■■□□
    I'm a big fan of CCs. I got my first 60 credits at one and randomly go back every now and then to take a class or two. I took my Cisco Networking Academy classes there before starting my most recent job and throughout the years I've had nothing but top notch professors; some even came to the CC from 4 year schools (their reason being they hated the ridiculous bureaucracies there lol).
Sign In or Register to comment.