By September I will have 4 months of IT experience. Which cert would be easier to get

The 4 months of IT experience I have is dealing with Microsoft Windows XP Professional Systems such as installing them to desks and drilling in computer tracks for them. I have also learned how to configure HP printers. All the products we are installing are HP products. However, I have also had 6 months of Volunteer experience with Windows XP professional and actually getting inside a computer. Everything from configuring Windows XP professional to installing it.

I know I've talked a lot on here recently, as many of you know I am a college student. Which cert would be the easiest for me to get next? I was studying for the N+ exam, and then gave up studying for it. I was also studying for the Windows 7 exam, and was ready to take that, but then most of the people on a different forum say the material in the book is not like the one given in the exam.

My question is, should I spend my money on more material, or finish up school and wait awhile? Most of my experience is Windows XP professional. I here that cert is going to retire in 2014. Is that enough time to shoot for the Windows XP Professional Cert? What exams do I need to take?

Comments

  • MishraMishra Member Posts: 2,468 ■■■■□□□□□□
    What are your goals? Future desires? Interests?
    My blog http://www.calegp.com

    You may learn something!
  • ArmymanisArmymanis Member Posts: 304
    Mishra wrote: »
    What are your goals? Future desires? Interests?

    I am having trouble deciding upon whether I should do Desktop Support or go into networking. I find numbers really boring and I really like to deal with the OS and helping other users navigate through it. I also really love imaging computers.

    On the other hand, I love routers, switches, and hubs. I have never played with a switch or a hub, but i have a router.

    Right now currently at my job, I am a Desktop Technician 1. Mounting HP Windows XP Professional Computers to Desks. I have learned so much from this job concerning different products that HP makes. A lot of people at my job say that this Desktop Technician 1, is not IT, but to me I think it is because we are dealing with computers even if it is mounting them to desks for users. I have also learned a lot about how to cable manage PC's.
  • cyberguyprcyberguypr Senior Member Mod Posts: 6,927 Mod
    Armymanis wrote: »
    A lot of people at my job say that this Desktop Technician 1, is not IT, but to me I think it is because we are dealing with computers even if it is mounting them to desks for users.

    (Rant mode on) I am curious, who are these people? IT? I'm aggravated by people who look down on help desk and/or desktop support. That is like saying mechanics are not part of the auto industry or that nurses are not healthcare professionals. (Rant mode off)

    Network+ is definitely a great foundation if you want to pursue networking. You said you started studying for it but gave up. Did you find the material too easy? Too difficult? Did you lose interest?
  • VAHokie56VAHokie56 Member Posts: 783
    Ya don't listen to them keep doing your thing man it sounds like you really enjoy it and are learning a great deal...haters gonna hate, just how it is
    .ιlι..ιlι.
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  • jibbajabbajibbajabba Member Posts: 4,317 ■■■■■■■■□□
    Armymanis wrote: »
    A lot of people at my job say that this Desktop Technician 1, is not IT, but to me I think it is because we are dealing with computers even if it is mounting them to desks for users. I have also learned a lot about how to cable manage PC's.

    IT is the abbreviation for Information Technology
    wikipedia wrote:
    Information technology (IT) is the acquisition, processing, storage and dissemination of vocal, pictorial, textual and numerical information by a microelectronics-based combination of computing and telecommunications.[

    IT is the area of managing technology and spans wide variety of areas that include but are not limited to things such as processes, computer software, information systems, computer hardware, programming languages, and data constructs. In short, anything that renders data, information or perceived knowledge in any visual format whatsoever, via any multimedia distribution mechanism, is considered part of the domain space known as Information Technology (IT).

    So, basically even if you just open the PC and clean the fan you are technically working in IT .. Like VAHokie56 says - don't listen to them and do your thing :)
    My own knowledge base made public: http://open902.com :p
  • jamesleecolemanjamesleecoleman Member Posts: 1,899 ■■■■■□□□□□
    I also think that the Network+ is a good way to start into networking. I think that you'll start to have an idea if thats what you want to do by studying for this certification.
    Booya!!
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  • DevilsbaneDevilsbane Member Posts: 4,214 ■■■■■■■■□□
    Armymanis wrote: »
    A lot of people at my job say that this Desktop Technician 1, is not IT, but to me I think it is because we are dealing with computers even if it is mounting them to desks for users. I have also learned a lot about how to cable manage PC's.
    cyberguypr wrote: »
    (Rant mode on) I am curious, who are these people? IT? I'm aggravated by people who look down on help desk and/or desktop support. That is like saying mechanics are not part of the auto industry or that nurses are not healthcare professionals. (Rant mode off)

    Any good IT manager/director knows that the helpdesk is probably the most important position in all of IT. Sure, it doesn't look like they do a whole lot initially. They don't deploy software or manage active directory, but they are the face of IT to the business, and guess who signs those large checks for all of that cool stuff? If your helpdesk paints a poor picture of IT to the business, you can probably count on not getting approvals for the things you want.

    I also think that the Network+ is a good way to start into networking. I think that you'll start to have an idea if thats what you want to do by studying for this certification.

    Even if you don't want to spend the money for the actual test, covering some material will give you some good groundwork.
    Decide what to be and go be it.
  • bigmantenorbigmantenor Member Posts: 233
    From what I've gathered, taking the XP exams is probably not the way to go at this point. If you wish to gain the knowledge, by all means do so. However, the Windows 7 exams I believe are going to give you better bang for the buck right now. Also, I agree that if you are thinking about studying networking then the Network+ is the way to go; it will give you a nice broad overview of your possible career path.
  • RobertKaucherRobertKaucher A cornfield in OhioMember Posts: 4,299 ■■■■■■■■■■
    Armymanis wrote: »
    I am having trouble deciding upon whether I should do Desktop Support or go into networking. I find numbers really boring and I really like to deal with the OS and helping other users navigate through it. I also really love imaging computers.

    On the other hand, I love routers, switches, and hubs. I have never played with a switch or a hub, but i have a router.

    Right now currently at my job, I am a Desktop Technician 1. Mounting HP Windows XP Professional Computers to Desks. I have learned so much from this job concerning different products that HP makes. A lot of people at my job say that this Desktop Technician 1, is not IT, but to me I think it is because we are dealing with computers even if it is mounting them to desks for users. I have also learned a lot about how to cable manage PC's.

    Here is what I would suggest as a good 1.5 to 2 year plan for you:
    Net+
    MCTS: Windows 7 Config
    MCITP:EDST7
    MCITP: EDA7

    This will follow your current experience well and it will also exand on thse skills. At the start a year and 1/2 is a loooong time, so things might change. But from what you have said I think thats a good direction to move in right now.
  • Paul BozPaul Boz Member Posts: 2,620 ■■■■■■■■□□
    Skip the network plus and just go for a CCNA. The two test route makes it easier than it used to be and you'll have a much more industry respected entry-level networking cert.
    CCNP | CCIP | CCDP | CCNA, CCDA
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  • ArmymanisArmymanis Member Posts: 304
    cyberguypr wrote: »
    (Rant mode on) I am curious, who are these people? IT? I'm aggravated by people who look down on help desk and/or desktop support. That is like saying mechanics are not part of the auto industry or that nurses are not healthcare professionals. (Rant mode off)

    Network+ is definitely a great foundation if you want to pursue networking. You said you started studying for it but gave up. Did you find the material too easy? Too difficult? Did you lose interest?

    Well I had taken a N+ class before and found the material kinda dry and boring. I did find some stuff useful that would help me along the way. I got an A out of the class which was based on the N+ exam preparation materials. So thinking it would be a cake walk, i bought another book for $36 so now I have two different books. Now it is just plain boring. I know Networking is very important in IT, but I can get more satisfaction towards helping end users with their problems. Most of the companies now a days use windows XP that I have seen and some even use Windows vista. None have transferred over to Windows 7.

    I am a very motivated person when it comes to learning computers, but not sure which path would be the right path. I know I want to finish my AA in Technical Support, and get my Bachelors of Information Technology and Administrative management. I know they are just stepping stones to bigger opportunities, but I need guidance on which path to take for certifications.

    As far as Windows 7 cert goes, I can memorize things really well if I am interested in the technology. However, I have heard that the material is not correct on the book that I got. I did practice questions from a class and only got 50% on stuff. I would rather much be learning about operating systems so i can help future users.
  • EssendonEssendon Member Posts: 4,546 ■■■■■■■■■■
    It's good to hear you are motivated and eager to learn as much as you can. I see you enjoy supporting end users, but I think this interest will wane as you gain more experience in the industry. In a few years from now, I bet you'll want to be as distant from end users as possible. I believe this is normal and I believe others would concur.

    As far certs go for now, I think Robert has a nice path mapped out for ya. Perhaps completely skip the N+, if you find it dull and boring, no point in doing something you dont enjoy. Lemme warn you about the Win7 certs though, the Win7 Configuring, 70-680 test, can be a bear to get past. Take your while on it, many if not most people have been surprised by it. Start reading the Dan Poulton book on Win7, go through it slowly and surely, lab the material as much as you can. Only take the test when you are 100% ready. It's not an easy test.

    I'd recommend you focus on the job for now, learn as much as you can. The certs can come a bit later. You want to show your employers that you are worth keeping around.

    Just me 2 cents.
    NSX, NSX, more NSX..

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  • N2ITN2IT Inactive Imported Users Posts: 7,483 ■■■■■■■■■■
    I think Windows 7 would be a nice addition. That seems to seperate the men from the boys.

    I wish I had the time to study for it. My kids are getting to the age where I have very little me time.
  • pzeropzero Member Posts: 192
    N2IT wrote: »
    I wish I had the time to study for it. My kids are getting to the age where I have very little me time.

    ^^whats that? the street lights are on..... OK time for bed..... icon_rolleyes.gif
  • DjScientistDjScientist Member Posts: 68 ■■□□□□□□□□
    You seems very dedicated and you will surely make it through anything you want to do. Consider picking up where you left on your N+ material and take a look at Windows 7. I personally do not think you should spend most of the time on Windows XP material. Majority of companies are looking into deploying Windows 7 as their client operating system. That being said,most of the good people in here will have some to say and you can decide on what you do. We are only providing advices, you have to decide on what you want to do.

    Goodluck and let us know what you have decided!!
    Working on 293:
  • ArmymanisArmymanis Member Posts: 304
    I know I have to finish my AA in Technical Support (only one class to go) and then get my bachelors started. Better do those first. Then I can work on certifications. I've already done the hardest part, which was get a job in IT.

    Is .Net programming hard? That is the class I am going to be taking and it sounds like it is really hard.

    How long did it take you guy's to be able to open up a PC in a work environment and actually fix it? I've done it a lot while volunteering (6 months total if you want to be specific), but so far in my work environment its all been setting up PC's on desks and not actually opening them up to fix it.
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