What are good credentials to get for IT Forensics?

higherhohigherho Posts: 882Member
Is their a Masters degree thats not to expensive ? Any great / good certs to get? I'm interested in knowing more on this side of the field and I think it can help my overall knowledge of IT a bit more.


Any help would be appreciated.

Comments

  • pzeropzero Posts: 192Member
    higherho wrote: »
    Is their a Masters degree thats not to expensive ? Any great / good certs to get? I'm interested in knowing more on this side of the field and I think it can help my overall knowledge of IT a bit more.


    Any help would be appreciated.

    This is where I want to head in the long run, the way that I see things you cant analyse something you know little about. So for me I want to finish off my MCITP, get a min of CCNA so that I have a good understanding of networking, complete security+ and then start on offensive and defensive security so you know what methods are used for attacks and defences.

    The journey of a thousand miles starts with a single step or something like that.
  • higherhohigherho Posts: 882Member
    pzero wrote: »
    This is where I want to head in the long run, the way that I see things you cant analyse something you know little about. So for me I want to finish off my MCITP, get a min of CCNA so that I have a good understanding of networking, complete security+ and then start on offensive and defensive security so you know what methods are used for attacks and defences.

    The journey of a thousand miles starts with a single step or something like that.

    That makes sense. I am doing the same thing you are doing regarding the certifications.
  • powerfoolpowerfool Senior Member Posts: 1,623Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    pzero wrote: »
    The journey of a thousand miles starts with a single step or something like that.

    Except the dichotomy paradox states that not only will you never reach your destination, but that it is impossible for you to even take the first step. :)

    "Suppose Homer wants to catch a stationary bus. Before he can get there, he must get halfway there. Before he can get halfway there, he must get a quarter of the way there. Before traveling a quarter, he must travel one-eighth; before an eighth, one-sixteenth; and so on."

    "This sequence also presents a second problem in that it contains no first distance to run, for any possible (finite) first distance could be divided in half, and hence would not be first after all. Hence, the trip cannot even begin. The paradoxical conclusion then would be that travel over any finite distance can neither be completed nor begun, and so all motion must be an illusion."

    Food for thought.
    70-346 [ ] 70-347 [ ] 70-533 [ ] 70-743 [ ] CCSP [ ]
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  • Excellent1Excellent1 Posts: 461Member ■■■■■■□□□□
    powerfool wrote: »
    Except the dichotomy paradox states that not only will you never reach your destination, but that it is impossible for you to even take the first step. :)

    "Suppose Homer wants to catch a stationary bus. Before he can get there, he must get halfway there. Before he can get halfway there, he must get a quarter of the way there. Before traveling a quarter, he must travel one-eighth; before an eighth, one-sixteenth; and so on."

    "This sequence also presents a second problem in that it contains no first distance to run, for any possible (finite) first distance could be divided in half, and hence would not be first after all. Hence, the trip cannot even begin. The paradoxical conclusion then would be that travel over any finite distance can neither be completed nor begun, and so all motion must be an illusion."

    Food for thought.

    Today is tomorrow from the standpoint of yesterday; thus proving that not only does tomorrow come--it's already here.

    Anyway, yeah, there are several degrees out there that are sort of tailored for the field, but I haven't seen any testimonials from people that have gone through those programs and actually ended up working in the field. Would be interesting if anyone working in forensics would post their experience and the path that led to them to their role.
  • dratnoldratnol Posts: 65Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    higherho, what state do you live in? Are you looking for an online program or would you move to attend classes?

    I just finished up the Masters in Digital Forensics at the University of Central Florida. It was a great program in my opinion but it was expensive. If you only want to get a graduate certificate, you can qualify for in-state tutition costs. This program can be completed entirely online if you so wish.

    In addition to that, Eastern Michigan University is now offering a forensic track with in their IA program. I don't think that is offered online though.

    Currently I am a technology coordinator for multiple school districts but have a goal and a plan to get more into forensics.
  • veritas_libertasveritas_libertas CISSP, GIAC x5, CompTIA x5 Greenville, SC USAPosts: 5,735Member ■■■■■■■■■■
    higherho wrote: »
    Is their a Masters degree thats not to expensive ? Any great / good certs to get? I'm interested in knowing more on this side of the field and I think it can help my overall knowledge of IT a bit more.


    Any help would be appreciated.

    Check out: Digital Forensics - Digital Forensics, Computer Forensic Training, eDiscovery
    Currently working on: Linux and Python
  • nhprnhpr Posts: 165Member
    Not training, but something always worth noting: Many states require you to have a private investigator's license to legally do computer forensics and testify in court. You might want to check your state's laws and look into getting a license while you're doing research into degrees.
  • dratnoldratnol Posts: 65Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    nhpr wrote: »
    Not training, but something always worth noting: Many states require you to have a private investigator's license to legally do computer forensics and testify in court. You might want to check your state's laws and look into getting a license while you're doing research into degrees.

    That is most certainly something that one needs to be cognizant of. Some require a PI license if you are not working for a law enforcement agency. Some require a degree or professional certification and yets others nothing at all. It could be real easy to get into trouble if one is not careful.
  • higherhohigherho Posts: 882Member
    dratnol wrote: »
    higherho, what state do you live in? Are you looking for an online program or would you move to attend classes?

    I just finished up the Masters in Digital Forensics at the University of Central Florida. It was a great program in my opinion but it was expensive. If you only want to get a graduate certificate, you can qualify for in-state tutition costs. This program can be completed entirely online if you so wish.

    In addition to that, Eastern Michigan University is now offering a forensic track with in their IA program. I don't think that is offered online though.

    Currently I am a technology coordinator for multiple school districts but have a goal and a plan to get more into forensics.

    I live in PA and I rather not spend a ton of money for a Masters so I prefer to go to an online school.


    O! thank you for the link!
  • JDMurrayJDMurray Certification Invigilator Surf City, USAPosts: 11,261Admin Admin
    The problem with getting a highly specialized graduate degree is if you no longer want to work in that profession, you may not be able to use your specialized degree to start another career.

    In computer forensics, making mistakes in court can cause your reputation to be damaged to the point where you are rejected from the (small, tightly-knit) computer forensics community itself. Not being able to get work, you will have no alternative but to find a different career, or possibly move to a country where your professional reputation is not known.
  • veritas_libertasveritas_libertas CISSP, GIAC x5, CompTIA x5 Greenville, SC USAPosts: 5,735Member ■■■■■■■■■■
    JDMurray wrote: »
    The problem with getting a highly specialized graduate degree is if you no longer want to work in that profession, you may not be able to use your specialized degree to start another career.

    In computer forensics, making mistakes in court can cause your reputation to be damaged to the point where you are rejected from the (small, tightly-knit) computer forensics community itself. Not being able to get work, you will have no alternative but to find a different career, or possibly move to a country where your professional reputation is not known.

    I have to agree, but using that fear/concern to keep you from getting a great education from a university like the University of Central Florida seems a bit crazy to me. As we have both said many times on TE, having a degree in an unrelated field will not hold you back in IT.
    Currently working on: Linux and Python
  • demonfurbiedemonfurbie Posts: 1,819Member
    JDMurray wrote: »
    The problem with getting a highly specialized graduate degree is if you no longer want to work in that profession, you may not be able to use your specialized degree to start another career.

    In computer forensics, making mistakes in court can cause your reputation to be damaged to the point where you are rejected from the (small, tightly-knit) computer forensics community itself. Not being able to get work, you will have no alternative but to find a different career, or possibly move to a country where your professional reputation is not known.

    ohh so true

    and its not all fun and games you spend alot of time sitting in a court house doing nothing but trying to explain to a judge the difference between a thumb drive and a hard drive and face book vs google (or "the google" as they like to call it)

    most of the meat of finding the info your having 8 or 9 lawyers stand over your shoulder questioning every mouse click you do

    on top of that there is a crapload of paperwork involved and god forbid you dont dumb it down or misuse a word

    i had one report i had to totally redo (300 pages) wiht out using the work computer i had to use the word computer i had to use the word mac. and the report was type written because the judge doesnt trust computers (or macs)
    wgu undergrad: done ... woot!!
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  • JDMurrayJDMurray Certification Invigilator Surf City, USAPosts: 11,261Admin Admin
    As we have both said many times on TE, having a degree in an unrelated field will not hold you back in IT.
    That is very true, but I do think more generalized degrees cast a larger net over employment prospects.

    And I'm not disrespecting computer forensics degrees. I would get one myself in a second (read: over three years) if someone else would pay for it. icon_moneyeyes.gif
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