What Network+ knowledge is required for Linux+

MokilokMokilok Member Posts: 18 ■□□□□□□□□□
Hi Guys,


I'm very keen to get started on Linux+ (Self-Study) but in the book I'm reading it says Network+ is recommended before Linux+.

What I'm wondering is what kind of knowledge is required,
i.e. Basic Network+ skills or an advanced understanding.

My current networking skills include:
Understanding the difference between internet and external IP Addresses.
Understanding Static VS Dynamic IP Addresses,
Understanding IP Address Classes,
Mac Addressing,
Incoming vs outgoing ports and port forwarding,
IP Services - i.e. DHCP,
Basic Subnetting
Various services that run on TCP/IP and their corresponding port numbers (and how to use them):
FTP
SSH
Telnet
SMTP
HTTP
HTTPS

Difference between TCP and UDP.

I run my own Domain Controller and Proxy server at home.

Is this level of knowledge sufficient for a pass in Linux +?

Comments

  • SlowhandSlowhand MCSE: Cloud Platform and Infrastructure, MCSA: Windows Server 2003/2012/2016, CCNA Routing & Switchi Bay Area, CaliforniaMod Posts: 5,163 Mod
    When I took the older Linux+ exam, I was surprised at how many topics there were on networking. Then again, the A+ certification also has quite an impressive amount of networking that needs to be learned in order to pass the exams. However, since most Linux distros can be used as both a client and server OS, you're going to be looking at setting up DNS services, (most likely with BIND,) setting up DHCP services, setting up an SSH server, etc. from a server point of view, as well as learning how to configure network settings just to get the box to talk to the LAN. Keep in mind, this was long before Linux+ and LPIC-1 were the same cert. I tried to sit for the LPI exams back then, they were much tougher.

    The prior knowledge you've listed is definitely going to help you a great deal. However, plan on spending a lot of time labbing for this exam, don't be afraid to get your hands dirty by setting up your own physical machines or VMs and practice. I'd recommend getting a Red Hat (Enterprise) based OS and Debian to start with, so you're covering all your bases in terms of software you'll be asked about on the exams. One thing is certain, the more you learn about networking from the Linux+ material, the less you'll have to study if you ever pursue Network+, CCNA, or one of the two Server 2008 MCITP certs.

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  • MokilokMokilok Member Posts: 18 ■□□□□□□□□□
    Thank you for the response.

    I've recently started using Ubuntu 11.04 on my Desktop PC and my second PC at work to kind of force me to get used to using it. I have read that Ubuntu is a Child Distro of Debian so is this OS a good choice for me or am I wasting my time with it?

    I'd be happy to use RHEL but they charge for Updates don't they? Last I checked (which was around RHEL 4) they made it difficult to get your hands on their OS without being a paying subscriber.
  • SlowhandSlowhand MCSE: Cloud Platform and Infrastructure, MCSA: Windows Server 2003/2012/2016, CCNA Routing & Switchi Bay Area, CaliforniaMod Posts: 5,163 Mod
    Ubuntu definitely isn't a waste of time, but it does tend to be a little more user-friendly than you want if you're learning Linux's inner workings. For a lab-box, definitely go with Debian instead of one of its derivatives. As for Red Hat, you can get the same features in CentOS that you do with RHEL, without having to pay through the nose. They make their distro to be as close to RHEL as possible, using all the same packages and features, (but they update their product a little more slowly.) You can also look at Fedora, which is community-version of RHEL, but it's not quite what you'd see out in the wild, more than likely.

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  • YuckTheFankeesYuckTheFankees Member Posts: 1,281 ■■■■■□□□□□
    Slowhand,

    I was trying to downloand CentOS but after I click on the i386 link, the page comes up with so many blue links. Which one do I use? I'm currently running backtrack 5.1 on my 2nd laptop (which is the laptop I'm going to put CentOS on)
  • SlowhandSlowhand MCSE: Cloud Platform and Infrastructure, MCSA: Windows Server 2003/2012/2016, CCNA Routing & Switchi Bay Area, CaliforniaMod Posts: 5,163 Mod
    The mirrors on CenOS' site seem to be mostly dead, so you could always try DistroWatch instead. The page for CentOS should be here. Looks like there's also a Live CD to try out if you'd like to test-drive CentOS before you do a full install.

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  • lsud00dlsud00d Member Posts: 1,571
    Slowhand,

    I was trying to downloand CentOS but after I click on the i386 link, the page comes up with so many blue links. Which one do I use? I'm currently running backtrack 5.1 on my 2nd laptop (which is the laptop I'm going to put CentOS on)

    Whatever you do...don't Hail Mary the full Nmap scan!!
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