Looking for Career Advice

New GeekNew Geek ■□□□□□□□□□ Posts: 1Registered Users ■□□□□□□□□□
After 8 long years as a banker, hocking checking accounts and helping to put people into debt, I am looking for a more rewarding career and decided on the IT world. It is consistently reported as either a recession proof or resistant field. The one catch I see is experience... I don't have any.

I am beginning work in January on an Associates in Computer Network Security at Joliet Junior College. Here's the link to the curriculum Computer and Network Security Specialist Requirements

Currently, I am unemployed and am looking for advice as to where I look to get some type of an entry level position in IT, so I can start gaining that experience.

My resume will reflect no IT experience and will probably turn most IT employers off, due to the 8 years of banking experience. All they will see is banking management and sales. No IT! How do I get around this issue and show my desire to a company that will give me an opportunity work and start a new career in the IT field?

Comments

  • EveryoneEveryone Posts: 1,661Member
    Actually, your banking experience may be a benefit. Although only if you don't mind staying in the same industry. The Financial sector tends to heavily prefer IT employees with previous experience in the Financial industry, and not necessarily IT experience.

    Plenty of opportunities in the Chicago area too, so you may be in a pretty good spot.
  • nelnel ■□□□□□□□□□ Posts: 2,859Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    New Geek wrote: »
    After 8 long years as a banker, hocking checking accounts and helping to put people into debt, I am looking for a more rewarding career and decided on the IT world. It is consistently reported as either a recession proof or resistant field. The one catch I see is experience... I don't have any.

    I am beginning work in January on an Associates in Computer Network Security at Joliet Junior College. Here's the link to the curriculum Computer and Network Security Specialist Requirements

    Currently, I am unemployed and am looking for advice as to where I look to get some type of an entry level position in IT, so I can start gaining that experience.

    My resume will reflect no IT experience and will probably turn most IT employers off, due to the 8 years of banking experience. All they will see is banking management and sales. No IT! How do I get around this issue and show my desire to a company that will give me an opportunity work and start a new career in the IT field?

    Its a hard one but everyone starts from ground zero! Your financial experience is a BIG thing for Banks who are hiring! i have some and recruiters seem to get a tingle in their pants when they see it :D haha.

    What area of IT are you looking to get into?

    i would try:

    1) contract work - a quick way to gain some entry level experience if you can get it. Its temp work but with you being available ASAP it could be a good avenue.
    2) volunteer - gain some experiance but dont get paid :s. Obviously getting the initial experience will be the key benefit
    3) apply for perm positions but i would usually say dont expect anything more than a helpdesk / support role position, although it can happen where people get higher junior roles.
    4) get those certs! entry ones like comptia, microsoft and CCNA can be a huge help. Depends on what area your aiming for tbh.
    5) continue with your college course.
    6) social network! you'll be surprised what contacts can do for you.

    Thats just a few quick suggestions.
    Xbox Live: Bring It On

    Bsc (hons) Network Computing - 1st Class
    WIP: Msc advanced networking
  • blargoeblargoe Self-Described Huguenot NC, USAPosts: 4,170Member ■■■■■■■■■□
    Everyone wrote: »
    Actually, your banking experience may be a benefit. Although only if you don't mind staying in the same industry. The Financial sector tends to heavily prefer IT employees with previous experience in the Financial industry, and not necessarily IT experience.

    Plenty of opportunities in the Chicago area too, so you may be in a pretty good spot.

    I strongly agree with this... go ahead and look for an helpdesk type job now in the finance sector. I think you would have a leg up compared to the other entry-level candidates because you know the business side. Smart companies really value that.
    IT guy since 12/00

    Recent: 2/2019 - Updated VCP to 6.5 (just a few days before VMware discontinued the re-cert policy...)
    Working on: RHCSA 7, learning Ansible
    Future: RHCE? VCAP6.5-DCD?
  • N2ITN2IT Posts: 7,483Inactive Imported Users
    blargoe wrote: »
    I strongly agree with this... go ahead and look for an helpdesk type job now in the finance sector. I think you would have a leg up compared to the other entry-level candidates because you know the business side. Smart companies really value that.

    Agree with Blargoe and Everyone.

    You could hop on a help desk and get involved with financial application, reporting, EPR Enterprise Resource Planning support. These jobs can be very technicial and rewarding. You always want to leverage your past experiences if at all possible.
  • ptilsenptilsen ■■■■■■■■■■ Posts: 2,835Member ■■■■■■■■■■
    Unless your degree allows credit transfer to a respectable 4-year program, you might want to consider starting into a four-year degree. Many forum members here will recommend WGU, which gets you certified as a part of the program.

    Other than that, my advice is get your A+ and Net+ in that order. Once you have the A+, doors will open for you.
    Working B.S., Computer Science
    Complete: 55/120 credits SPAN 201, LIT 100, ETHS 200, AP Lang, MATH 120, WRIT 231, ICS 140, MATH 215, ECON 202, ECON 201, ICS 141, MATH 210, LING 111, ICS 240
    In progress: CLEP US GOV,
    Next up: MATH 211, ECON 352, ICS 340
Sign In or Register to comment.