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  • bermovickbermovick Posts: 1,134Member ■■■■□□□□□□
    Work has been busy and chaotic and extremely stressful the past month. The contract changed hands and the new company is ... less competent than the previous one.

    Our server team no longer has certified people so they aren't allowed to touch servers. Instead our COR has the network team (all 2 of us) working the servers, despite neither of us being certified either. Plus the new company being out of compliance with the contract pretty much since day 1 leaves our future employment a bit shaky....

    So I haven't spent much of the past month studying. However I just found out my friend got his numbers yesterday (his 3rd try), so I need to try to get better at focusing and get my ass my numbers too. Tonight I'm actually studying instead of playing my MMO.

    INE full-size lab 1. Doing well, although complex redistribution is STILL my weakest point, I think. When you've got 3 routing protocols plus connected redistribution, with 4 points of redistribution (not counting the connected->protocol), it's just difficult getting it in my head. Then I google examples and they're all "here's 2 protocols with 2 redistribution points" as if that's even the same ballpark. I managed to get the topology stable, but I had to use the "throw everything at it until something works" method, which isn't the best one.
    Latest Completed: CISSP

    Current goal: Dunno
  • bermovickbermovick Posts: 1,134Member ■■■■□□□□□□
    Ran into a weird thing today going into multicast since it's been a while since I touched it last. I was being lazy and using the (*,224.0.1.40) route that gets automatically installed as verification I had a good config, but I kept getting confused because that mroute didn't look correct.

    I still don't know why, but that mroute seems to (randomly?) leave out interfaces from its Outgoing interface list:
    R5#sh ip mroute
    IP Multicast Routing Table
    Flags: D - Dense, S - Sparse, B - Bidir Group, s - SSM Group, C - Connected,
           L - Local, P - Pruned, R - RP-bit set, F - Register flag,
           T - SPT-bit set, J - Join SPT, M - MSDP created entry,
           X - Proxy Join Timer Running, A - Candidate for MSDP Advertisement,
           U - URD, I - Received Source Specific Host Report,
           Z - Multicast Tunnel, z - MDT-data group sender,
           Y - Joined MDT-data group, y - Sending to MDT-data group
    Outgoing interface flags: H - Hardware switched, A - Assert winner
     Timers: Uptime/Expires
     Interface state: Interface, Next-Hop or VCD, State/Mode
    
    (*, 239.1.1.1), 00:02:25/stopped, RP 0.0.0.0, flags: D
      Incoming interface: Null, RPF nbr 0.0.0.0
      Outgoing interface list:
        FastEthernet0/1, Forward/Dense, 00:02:25/00:00:00
        FastEthernet0/0, Forward/Dense, 00:02:25/00:00:00
        FastEthernet1/0, Forward/Dense, 00:02:25/00:00:00
    
    [snip]
    
    (*, 224.0.1.40), 01:26:50/00:02:48, RP 0.0.0.0, flags: DCL
      Incoming interface: Null, RPF nbr 0.0.0.0
      Outgoing interface list:
        FastEthernet0/0, Forward/Dense, 01:21:00/00:00:00
        FastEthernet1/0, Forward/Dense, 01:26:50/00:00:00
    

    I actually had to troubleshoot for a while why F0/1 wasn't in the 224.0.1.40 mroute, assuming I had some misconfiguration.
    Latest Completed: CISSP

    Current goal: Dunno
  • bermovickbermovick Posts: 1,134Member ■■■■□□□□□□
    See, this is confusing me: I expect a certain output but I don't get it. Take a look at this:

    This is a simple diamond of 4 routers (think 12, 3, 6, 9 on a clock). Router "R6" is doing autorp advertisements (it's both a CRP and mapping agent). "R12" should be receiving info from the other 2 (R3 & R9), and I expect to see both interfaces in the (*,G) mroute's Outgoing Interface list. I should then see one of them (the one that passes the RPF check) as the Incoming Interface of the (S,G) mroute, correct?

    That's what I see on the routers in the middle "R3" and "R9"
    (*, 224.0.1.40), 20:18:33/stopped, RP 0.0.0.0, flags: DCL
      Incoming interface: Null, RPF nbr 0.0.0.0
      Outgoing interface list:
        FastEthernet0/0, Forward/Dense, 20:18:33/00:00:00
        FastEthernet0/1, Forward/Dense, 20:18:33/00:00:00
    
    (6.6.6.6, 224.0.1.40), 20:18:32/00:02:59, flags: LT
      Incoming interface: FastEthernet0/1, RPF nbr 192.168.69.6
      Outgoing interface list:
        FastEthernet0/0, Forward/Dense, 20:18:32/00:00:00, A
    

    But not on "R12"
    (*, 224.0.1.40), 4d20h/stopped, RP 0.0.0.0, flags: DCL
      Incoming interface: Null, RPF nbr 0.0.0.0
      Outgoing interface list:
        FastEthernet0/0, Forward/Dense, 4d20h/00:00:00
    
    (6.6.6.6, 224.0.1.40), 20:12:03/00:02:59, flags: PLT
      Incoming interface: FastEthernet0/1, RPF nbr 192.168.123.3
      Outgoing interface list:
        FastEthernet0/0, Prune/Dense, 00:01:27/00:01:32
    

    Am I missing a step? I can't find anything that would explain why the (*,G) is missing F0/1.
    Latest Completed: CISSP

    Current goal: Dunno
  • AwesomeGarrettAwesomeGarrett Posts: 257Member
    I'd hate to jump to conclusions. Do you have config snippets? PIM, Auto-RP, IGP, and interfaces? Are you following an example from Cisco Docs?
  • bermovickbermovick Posts: 1,134Member ■■■■□□□□□□
    No; I was having trouble with the multicast section of an INE workbook so I wrote up a small custom lab.




    I changed the router numbers in my previous post to make it easier to visualize. The section I'm looking at are actually routers 1-4.

    Here's the ACTUAL unedited mroute on R1:
    (*, 224.0.1.40), 4d21h/stopped, RP 0.0.0.0, flags: DCL
      Incoming interface: Null, RPF nbr 0.0.0.0
      Outgoing interface list:
        FastEthernet0/0, Forward/Dense, 4d21h/00:00:00
    
    (4.4.4.4, 224.0.1.40), 21:07:15/00:02:58, flags: L
      Incoming interface: FastEthernet0/1, RPF nbr 192.168.13.3
      Outgoing interface list:
        FastEthernet0/0, Forward/Dense, 00:00:00/00:00:00
    

    (as a test, I created a /0 mroute pointing to R2 instead to see how the output would change with the RPF change, and it equally made no sense):
    (*, 224.0.1.40), 4d21h/stopped, RP 0.0.0.0, flags: DCL
      Incoming interface: Null, RPF nbr 0.0.0.0
      Outgoing interface list:
        FastEthernet0/0, Forward/Dense, 4d21h/00:00:00
    
    (4.4.4.4, 224.0.1.40), 21:06:40/00:02:58, flags: PLT
      Incoming interface: FastEthernet0/0, RPF nbr 192.168.12.2, Mroute
      Outgoing interface list: Null
    


    Nothing fancy with the config either:

    R4:
    R4#sh run | s pim|0/0|0/1
     ip pim dense-mode
    interface FastEthernet0/0
     ip address 192.168.34.4 255.255.255.0
     ip pim dense-mode
     ip ospf network point-to-point
     ip ospf 1 area 0
     duplex auto
     speed auto
    interface FastEthernet0/1
     ip address 192.168.24.4 255.255.255.0
     ip pim dense-mode
     ip ospf network point-to-point
     ip ospf 1 area 0
     duplex auto
     speed auto
     ip pim dense-mode
    ip pim send-rp-announce Loopback0 scope 10 interval 1
    ip pim send-rp-discovery Loopback0 scope 10 interval 1
    

    R2:
    R2# sh run | s pim|0/0|0/1
     ip pim dense-mode
    interface FastEthernet0/0
     ip address 192.168.12.2 255.255.255.0
     ip pim dense-mode
     ip ospf network point-to-point
     ip ospf 1 area 0
     duplex auto
     speed auto
    interface FastEthernet0/1
     ip address 192.168.24.2 255.255.255.0
     ip pim dense-mode
     ip ospf network point-to-point
     ip ospf 1 area 0
     duplex auto
     speed auto
     ip pim dense-mode
    ip pim autorp listener
    

    R3:
    R3#sh run | s pim|0/0|0/1
     ip pim dense-mode
    interface FastEthernet0/0
     ip address 192.168.34.3 255.255.255.0
     ip pim dense-mode
     ip ospf network point-to-point
     ip ospf 1 area 0
     duplex auto
     speed auto
    interface FastEthernet0/1
     ip address 192.168.13.3 255.255.255.0
     ip pim dense-mode
     ip ospf network point-to-point
     ip ospf 1 area 0
     duplex auto
     speed auto
     ip pim dense-mode
    ip pim autorp listener
    

    R1:
    R1#sh run | s pim|0/0|0/1
     ip pim dense-mode
    interface FastEthernet0/0
     ip address 192.168.12.1 255.255.255.0
     ip pim dense-mode
     ip ospf network point-to-point
     ip ospf 1 area 0
     duplex auto
     speed auto
    interface FastEthernet0/1
     ip address 192.168.13.1 255.255.255.0
     ip pim dense-mode
     ip ospf network point-to-point
     ip ospf 1 area 0
     duplex auto
     speed auto
     ip pim dense-mode
    
    Latest Completed: CISSP

    Current goal: Dunno
  • Dieg0MDieg0M Posts: 861Member
    What IOS are you using? I am pretty sure that all hosts and PIM neighbor interfaces should be in the shared tree of a PIM-DM group.
    Follow my CCDE journey at www.routingnull0.com
  • bermovickbermovick Posts: 1,134Member ■■■■□□□□□□
    That's what I thought! This was in gns3. I'll duplicate the lab in IOU and see if I get correct results then.
    Latest Completed: CISSP

    Current goal: Dunno
  • bermovickbermovick Posts: 1,134Member ■■■■□□□□□□
    I spend FAR too much of my time messing with unrelated crap.

    GNS3 multicast that doesn't make sense (see above).
    IOU crashes that I've spent the last 3 days trying to figure out.

    I've never had any issue going through labs, but now as soon as I send traffic over ONE of the 4 switches, it crashes
    ../src-unix/unix_io.c:561: unix_io_transmit: Assertion `chan_p != ((void *)0)' failed.

    Why only the one? Why has it never crashed before when doing the labs? You tell me. I can't even finish the lab at this point.

    Sometimes I think the universe is trying to send me a message cause I google this and NOBODY else has ever had any of these problems. Sheesh!
    Latest Completed: CISSP

    Current goal: Dunno
  • linuxabuserlinuxabuser Posts: 97Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    Buy VIRL, save yourself some headaches.
  • fredrikjjfredrikjj Posts: 879Member
    Buy VIRL, save yourself some headaches.

    Not really. Multicast for example is kind of buggy on IOSv, and who knows what else. CSR is where you need to go since it's supposed to be used for real environments, not just a lab, and you don't need VIRL to run CSR1000v.
  • bermovickbermovick Posts: 1,134Member ■■■■□□□□□□
    The only issue I've really had with CSR is it's memory requirements, and not having enough "current" physical switches to do the INE labs.

    The memory requirements can be worked around with an ESX server we bought for labbing (my wife is using it for her MCSA as well), but no switches are kindof a sticking point.

    I might check and see how much I can do with my 1950's, 3550 and 3560 though. But that's more time spent frelling with stuff outside of what I should actually be studying for :)
    Latest Completed: CISSP

    Current goal: Dunno
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