Tactics to move up the food chain in an company

N2ITN2IT Inactive Imported Users Posts: 7,483 ■■■■■■■■■■
My objective of this post is to create a brainstorming session to capture tools, strategies, techniques, and offerings that can be leveraged in the work place to advance. The great question is how do I move up if I am not given a chance. Or how do I get experience if they don't let me have the position, yet I can't get the experience because I don't have the position.

Solutions:

Be really awesome at something. I found that in an environment while working as a generalist one of the best ways to get out is to provide a skill that nobody has and nobody can obtain in a reasonable amount of time. Example could be great at a MS application, or able to develop using a program language or a great understanding of networking protocols. Whatever but I have seen this strategy work. You have a service desk full of techs, some with degrees some with certs some with both, but none really provide much value. However you have that one tech who is amazing at something. That is the one that usually get noticed. People tend to attract to greatness and when you are able to show your talents in a business you are well on your way of moving up the food chain.

Show your boss early that you are greatful for the position, but you want to move torward technology X. Ask can he introduce you to that team or that person who handles that particular technology. It's a great way to make a friend, allgiance to a higher level tech. A lot of times if something is happening with that technology he will go to you first. At this point you are building a communication channel to that individual and most of the time people are good and will assist. So make communications channels.

Communication channels aren't made on their own so take some time to create a org chart or review the one at your business if there is one. Start to document who is your friend who can't stand you and who is on the fence with you. You can't really influence the ones that like or hate you, but the ones on the fence you can shift to your side. Make that a priority to do that and it will help out a lot. Communication is the key.

Come in early and leave late. Clock watching is not going to get you anywhere. If you can, give extra time to learn the technology. If they see you busting you arse they will take notice to that. People like hard workers so make sure you work hard. During downtime don't surf the web study or goofy around, utilize that time to learn the technologies in your environment. At work make sure you are studying technologies that will give you value at your job not because you like it. While you are at work you would better be served to learn the technologies that you are supporting. The more you improve in that environment the more valuable you are and the more money you can make. Besides you can ask for bigger demands and get bigger promotions.

Ask you management for feedback on how you are doing. They like that, believe me they like that a lot so do it. Make sure you take their criticism and improve upon it. Don't get sad or down, just think of it as an opportunity.

Can anyone else provide some tips or tactics for the new guys trying to progress upward?

Comments

  • TurgonTurgon Banned Posts: 6,313 ■■■■■■■■■□
    N2IT wrote: »
    My objective of this post is to create a brainstorming session to capture tools, strategies, techniques, and offerings that can be leveraged in the work place to advance. The great question is how do I move up if I am not given a chance. Or how do I get experience if they don't let me have the position, yet I can't get the experience because I don't have the position.

    Solutions:

    Be really awesome at something. I found that in an environment while working as a generalist one of the best ways to get out is to provide a skill that nobody has and nobody can obtain in a reasonable amount of time. Example could be great at a MS application, or able to develop using a program language or a great understanding of networking protocols. Whatever but I have seen this strategy work. You have a service desk full of techs, some with degrees some with certs some with both, but none really provide much value. However you have that one tech who is amazing at something. That is the one that usually get noticed. People tend to attract to greatness and when you are able to show your talents in a business you are well on your way of moving up the food chain.

    Show your boss early that you are greatful for the position, but you want to move torward technology X. Ask can he introduce you to that team or that person who handles that particular technology. It's a great way to make a friend, allgiance to a higher level tech. A lot of times if something is happening with that technology he will go to you first. At this point you are building a communication channel to that individual and most of the time people are good and will assist. So make communications channels.

    Communication channels aren't made on their own so take some time to create a org chart or review the one at your business if there is one. Start to document who is your friend who can't stand you and who is on the fence with you. You can't really influence the ones that like or hate you, but the ones on the fence you can shift to your side. Make that a priority to do that and it will help out a lot. Communication is the key.

    Come in early and leave late. Clock watching is not going to get you anywhere. If you can, give extra time to learn the technology. If they see you busting you arse they will take notice to that. People like hard workers so make sure you work hard. During downtime don't surf the web study or goofy around, utilize that time to learn the technologies in your environment. At work make sure you are studying technologies that will give you value at your job not because you like it. While you are at work you would better be served to learn the technologies that you are supporting. The more you improve in that environment the more valuable you are and the more money you can make. Besides you can ask for bigger demands and get bigger promotions.

    Ask you management for feedback on how you are doing. They like that, believe me they like that a lot so do it. Make sure you take their criticism and improve upon it. Don't get sad or down, just think of it as an opportunity.

    Can anyone else provide some tips or tactics for the new guys trying to progress upward?

    Just be well respected by the people who decides who advances. If they see you as a performer you are golden. You can work 24/7, 365 and not be seen in that light. Business is mean like that. That's it really.
  • NetworkingStudentNetworkingStudent Member Posts: 1,407 ■■■■■■■■□□
    N2IT wrote: »
    My objective of this post is to create a brainstorming session to capture tools, strategies, techniques, and offerings that can be leveraged in the work place to advance. The great question is how do I move up if I am not given a chance. Or how do I get experience if they don't let me have the position, yet I can't get the experience because I don't have the position.

    Solutions:

    Be really awesome at something. I found that in an environment while working as a generalist one of the best ways to get out is to provide a skill that nobody has and nobody can obtain in a reasonable amount of time. Example could be great at a MS application, or able to develop using a program language or a great understanding of networking protocols. Whatever but I have seen this strategy work. You have a service desk full of techs, some with degrees some with certs some with both, but none really provide much value. However you have that one tech who is amazing at something. That is the one that usually get noticed. People tend to attract to greatness and when you are able to show your talents in a business you are well on your way of moving up the food chain.

    Show your boss early that you are greatful for the position, but you want to move torward technology X. Ask can he introduce you to that team or that person who handles that particular technology. It's a great way to make a friend, allgiance to a higher level tech. A lot of times if something is happening with that technology he will go to you first. At this point you are building a communication channel to that individual and most of the time people are good and will assist. So make communications channels.

    Communication channels aren't made on their own so take some time to create a org chart or review the one at your business if there is one. Start to document who is your friend who can't stand you and who is on the fence with you. You can't really influence the ones that like or hate you, but the ones on the fence you can shift to your side. Make that a priority to do that and it will help out a lot. Communication is the key.

    Come in early and leave late. Clock watching is not going to get you anywhere. If you can, give extra time to learn the technology. If they see you busting you arse they will take notice to that. People like hard workers so make sure you work hard. During downtime don't surf the web study or goofy around, utilize that time to learn the technologies in your environment. At work make sure you are studying technologies that will give you value at your job not because you like it. While you are at work you would better be served to learn the technologies that you are supporting. The more you improve in that environment the more valuable you are and the more money you can make. Besides you can ask for bigger demands and get bigger promotions.

    Ask you management for feedback on how you are doing. They like that, believe me they like that a lot so do it. Make sure you take their criticism and improve upon it. Don't get sad or down, just think of it as an opportunity.

    Can anyone else provide some tips or tactics for the new guys trying to progress upward?

    I don’t work in IT ,but I am looking for an IT job.

    A few things that I have seen that at my job that does work are the following:
    Make your bosses or someone else’s job easier, and they will in turn help you achieve their goals.
    Read and how to win freinds and influence people.

    A IT manger once told me in an interveiw” IT is seen as a cost..I try to make technology easier for people… ok he didn’t say those exact words, but something like that..

    Basically, what way can do to you save the company and will make peoples jobs easier, if you can do this you will be promoted quickly.

    Stay away from the water cooler gossip, focus on your job, and try to concern yourself with what others are doing in their personal life, or who is dating who ect..ect..

    Try to understand why your boss does what he does. Why does he make certain decisions?


    Be willing to accept change.

    Be conscious of your social media habits.

    This is my advice
    When one door closes, another opens; but we often look so long and so regretfully upon the closed door that we do not see the one which has opened."

    --Alexander Graham Bell,
    American inventor
  • nycidnycid Member Posts: 71 ■■□□□□□□□□
    I'm not sure about the come in early leave late. At my previous gig I would come in 20 mins early only because my kids were on the bus to school and it was easier to just ride in. At that time I would get the coffee and get ready for the day. During the day while everyone else is slacking off and being sociable I would work. I swear I could get more done than they could in a 15 hour day within the 8 hours I would "work"

    Now on my new gig I just make sure to offer help even if its something I have no idea about. I can google the hell out of anything and come up with some solutions. Make yourself available and do not be scared of the challenge and you should be able to excel. Also do not be scared to speak up about the possibility of promotion or moving through the ranks.....
  • RoguetadhgRoguetadhg CompTIA A+, Network+. Member Posts: 2,486 ■■■■■■■□□□
    For more businesses "Networking" is seen like health insurance. You hate to pay for it, but you know you need it.
    In order to succeed, your desire for success should be greater than your fear of failure.
    TE Threads: How to study for the CCENT/CCNA, Introduction to Cisco Exams

  • ValsacarValsacar Member Posts: 336
    I would be careful with that come in early and stay late. That can be seen as a sign of fraud or corporate espionage, being suspected of which would be far from helpful in your plans of advancement.
    WGU MS:ISA Progress:
    Required: NOTHING!!!!!
    Current Course: NONE

    Completed: COV2, LKT2, LOT2, FNV2, VUT2, JFT2, TFT2, JIT2, FYT2, FMV2, FXT2, FYV2, LQT2
    Started 01 May 2012, Degree awarded 29 Oct 2013
  • TurgonTurgon Banned Posts: 6,313 ■■■■■■■■■□
    Valsacar wrote: »
    I would be careful with that come in early and stay late. That can be seen as a sign of fraud or corporate espionage, being suspected of which would be far from helpful in your plans of advancement.

    I don't know about that. But I do know of the doormat philosophy. Every company has a few doormats, and unfortunately, management will happily let them work like elephants while they leave the office at a sane hour, take the credit for the doormat's efforts, and then offer the promotion to an outsider who then has the same hardworking doormats working work them when they hoped they would get the job. Life isn't fair. Don't be a doormat.
  • ValsacarValsacar Member Posts: 336
    Turgon wrote: »
    I don't know about that. But I do know of the doormat philosophy. Every company has a few doormats, and unfortunately, management will happily let them work like elephants while they leave the office at a sane hour, take the credit for the doormat's efforts, and then offer the promotion to an outsider who then has the same hardworking doormats working work them when they hoped they would get the job. Life isn't fair. Don't be a doormat.

    In the military we had a poster in the office that listed the "7 signs of espionage" and one of them was coming in earlier or working later than required. At my current company (GD) it is also listed as one of the signs of corporate espionage and/or fraud. Was also mentioned in my CISSP training as a possible sign of fraud or other ill intent.

    By itself it's nothing, but if something happens it could be a reason to add you to a "suspect" list. Doing so when there is a valid reason, like I'm at work on a Sunday because we have a big event tomorrow and some last minute changes on Friday made half my previous work invalid... oh well.
    WGU MS:ISA Progress:
    Required: NOTHING!!!!!
    Current Course: NONE

    Completed: COV2, LKT2, LOT2, FNV2, VUT2, JFT2, TFT2, JIT2, FYT2, FMV2, FXT2, FYV2, LQT2
    Started 01 May 2012, Degree awarded 29 Oct 2013
  • ptilsenptilsen Member Posts: 2,835 ■■■■■■■■■■
    Think of good ways to improve systems and processes. If you work a helpdesk, for example, find something that could be improved and try to bring it up to someone. It could be a simple as writing a batch script or creating a KB page to help with a task.

    Be professional, work hard, work smart, and always make it clear you're looking to learn more and move up. Don't be afraid to offer an analysis or opinion in the right way. As long as you're not making someone else feeling stupid, identifying methods to improve any facet of the organization is generally looked upon well. If it isn't, it's not a well managed organization, department, or team. I have a great CEO who will tell our level 1 techs "Don't be afraid to give me your opinion. I wouldn't have hired you if I didn't want it."

    Make sure you work in an organization that's managed like that, do your best to make a difference, and you will succeed.
    Working B.S., Computer Science
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  • N2ITN2IT Inactive Imported Users Posts: 7,483 ■■■■■■■■■■
    Valsacar wrote: »
    I would be careful with that come in early and stay late. That can be seen as a sign of fraud or corporate espionage, being suspected of which would be far from helpful in your plans of advancement.

    Early is relative I should of explained better.

    Coming in 15-20 mins early is not weird in fact it's good. Coming in exactly on time then having to log in and then actually starting 10-15 mins later is bad. Staying late to work and getting items accomplished is fine. I've done it for several fortune 500 companies and never had an issue with it. Sneaking around on Saturday or Sunday seems strange and I would agree that would send off a red flag unless those are you hours.

    Again it all depends on the circumstances.
  • N2ITN2IT Inactive Imported Users Posts: 7,483 ■■■■■■■■■■
    Valsacar wrote: »
    In the military we had a poster in the office that listed the "7 signs of espionage" and one of them was coming in earlier or working later than required. At my current company (GD) it is also listed as one of the signs of corporate espionage and/or fraud. Was also mentioned in my CISSP training as a possible sign of fraud or other ill intent.

    By itself it's nothing, but if something happens it could be a reason to add you to a "suspect" list. Doing so when there is a valid reason, like I'm at work on a Sunday because we have a big event tomorrow and some last minute changes on Friday made half my previous work invalid... oh well.

    That maybe so, but when you are over utilized and are expected to deliver on time sometime it requires extra work. This is where security has overstepped it bounds. The bottom line is the business and if security is impacting the business in a negative light they need to be audited and reprocessed.

    With all that said I have never seen anyone get profiled for coming in early or staying late. They may not be compensated for it, but never punished.
  • UnixGuyUnixGuy Are we having fun yet? Mod Posts: 4,201 Mod
    Regarding coming early and leaving early, this is my philosophy:

    I'm known to come early and leave exactly on time, some guys joke that I'm the first one to leave (which is true).

    I believe that "early is on time; on time is late", so I almost always arrive 10-30 minutes early, but I leave as soon as the clock ticks. I never ever work after hours unless I'm forced to, and weekend is a big no-no unless there's an emergency.



    Let your work and milestones speak for you (and you need to be that good to impress people constantly, so you need a sound progressive career plan). Plus, maintain a good relationship with customers and colleagues - be polite, social, and friendly. Speak with your boss occasionally about work and non-work related issue, and be helpful and friendly with everyone.
    Goal: MBA, Jan 2021
  • techdudeheretechdudehere Member Posts: 164
    Here's my thoughts:
    1) Don't be the guy who spends a half hour getting coffee and such. I think socializing pre-shift is a great idea, but do come in early if you're going to do that.
    2) Know what is valued in your company/department. I stopped coming in early at a job I had a few years ago because I found out the shift before me would try to leave the worst tickets. They knew a manager would check when 2nd shift started, so when I stopped coming in early they couldn't leave them there any more. At some companies, things external to IT were really valued such as community events. In other places, the tickets mattered or what one knew mattered most rather than sheer output. While I think being a good worker is always a good foundation, I think that just working away in a corner somewhere can lead to low visibility in some companies (but not all).

    It's worth taking note of whether coming in 30 minutes early would help you more than spending that 30 minutes studying for X certification your company wants someone to have, put that 2.5 hours a week toward community outreach, or perhaps even spend 30 minutes per morning socializing in the cafeteria. I think it will often depend on the environment.
  • elToritoelTorito Member Posts: 102
    Proactivity is essential. Don't just wait for the work to come to you, or for your manager to tell you what to do. Show that you're eager to take on new responsibilities, and when you do get them, give it your 100%. Also, don't shy away from the mundane things that no else wants to do, but find ways to do them more efficiently. IT workers that are purely reactive, IMO, won't get anywhere in this line of work.

    An example of the latter is when I asked a colleague to make an analysis of problem X we were having, because I couldn't spare the time to do it myself. Sure enough, he ended up making a short analysis (with emphasis on short), and that was that. A proactive course of action would've been to make that analysis, proceed with devising potential solutions, have the potential solutions tested and perhaps even take steps to implement the solution.

    I ended up solving the problem myself in my free time, because the analysis was wrong anyway.

    Management will notice the people who don't need to have their hands held all the time.
    WIP: CISSP, MCSE Server Infrastructure
    Casual reading: CCNP, Windows Sysinternals Administrator's Reference, Network Warrior


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