As a 15-month CCNA certified, which track should i take?

thedramathedrama Posts: 291Member
I got almost all resources for CCNP Route. However, someone who posted a topic related to CCNA Security in recent days in here left me indecisive.

As a very long-time CCNA certified and have repeated CCNA topics two or three times in order to be prepared well to the higher certs, i am curious about if what happens i go for
CCNA Security first rather than CCNP Route. Is it really much easier to obtain the Security
than CCNP Route cert?

Any ideas?
Monster PC specs(Packard Bell VR46) : Intel Celeron Dual-Core 1.2 GHz CPU , 4096 MB DDR3 RAM, Intel Media Graphics (R) 4 Family with IntelGMA 4500 M HD graphics. :lol:

5 year-old laptop PC specs(Toshiba Satellite A210) : AMD Athlon 64 x2 1.9 GHz CPU, ATI Radeon X1200 128 MB Video Memory graphics card, 3072 MB 667 Mhz DDR2 RAM. (1 stick 2 gigabytes and 1 stick 1 gigabytes)


Comments

  • SteveO86SteveO86 Posts: 1,423Member
    Route is at the Professional level, while CCNA:Security is as the Associate level.

    In my opinion CCNA:S covers some basic security knowledge any network admin/engineer should know. CCNA:S will branch out your knowledge on different topics, where as the ROUTE (CCNP in general) will give you a much deeper dive into the topics you already know from the CCNA objectives. (Routing protocols, switching concepts/STP, etc)

    Plus it really does pertain to what environment you work if you working with routing protocols all day then ROUTE might not be that for you, if you doing basic admin level working with IPSec VPN or Port Security CCNA:S might be the way the go. Although all it does depend on which way you want to take your career as well.

    No reason you can't do both right?
    My Networking blog
    Latest blog post: Let's review EIGRP Named Mode
    Currently Studying: CCNP: Wireless - IUWMS
  • azaghulazaghul Posts: 569Member ■■■■□□□□□□
    As somebody who has had their CCNA for 3 years, and still finds it a challenge to find long-term employment in these uncertain economic times, my suggestion is to examine all 3 of the CCNA concentrations, Security/Voice/Wireless.

    Sit the exams as you see fit, but at least have an understanding in a variety of areas to give yourself a better chance. After that, pursue the NP level certs as needed.
  • TurgonTurgon Posts: 6,313Banned
    thedrama wrote: »
    I got almost all resources for CCNP Route. However, someone who posted a topic related to CCNA Security in recent days in here left me indecisive.

    As a very long-time CCNA certified and have repeated CCNA topics two or three times in order to be prepared well to the higher certs, i am curious about if what happens i go for
    CCNA Security first rather than CCNP Route. Is it really much easier to obtain the Security
    than CCNP Route cert?

    Any ideas?

    It's not about easier. It's a about building your career. I say press on to CCNP now, but what is most important is getting access to the responsibilities at work that will give you exposure to the kind of experience you need to progress as a network engineer. That isn't always down to your certifications. This industry is littered with people who are well qualified and dont get the right exposure. When you are interviewed for a senior role by an external company they want to know what exposure and responsibilities you have had, and what you have accomplished. Those scoring well on all three fronts get hired. The rest will spend another year getting another cert and not progress.
  • thedramathedrama Posts: 291Member
    Turgon wrote: »
    It's not about easier. It's a about building your career. I say press on to CCNP now, but what is most important is getting access to the responsibilities at work that will give you exposure to the kind of experience you need to progress as a network engineer. That isn't always down to your certifications. This industry is littered with people who are well qualified and dont get the right exposure. When you are interviewed for a senior role by an external company they want to know what exposure and responsibilities you have had, and what you have accomplished. Those scoring well on all three fronts get hired. The rest will spend another year getting another cert and not progress.

    Your right. But, how about if you couldn't be able to be much experienced and sit still for about 15 months?
    Monster PC specs(Packard Bell VR46) : Intel Celeron Dual-Core 1.2 GHz CPU , 4096 MB DDR3 RAM, Intel Media Graphics (R) 4 Family with IntelGMA 4500 M HD graphics. :lol:

    5 year-old laptop PC specs(Toshiba Satellite A210) : AMD Athlon 64 x2 1.9 GHz CPU, ATI Radeon X1200 128 MB Video Memory graphics card, 3072 MB 667 Mhz DDR2 RAM. (1 stick 2 gigabytes and 1 stick 1 gigabytes)


  • spicy ahispicy ahi Posts: 413Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    thedrama wrote: »
    Your right. But, how about if you couldn't be able to be much experienced and sit still for about 15 months?

    So are you saying you don't currently work in a network position, or position where you have daily hands on with networking equipment? I've made that transition myself (moved from a network admin position to a security engineer position) and work on a network whose network devices are maintained by a different entity entirely (no one here can touch the network) so I had to shift my goals similarly. If you see my post in the CCNA Security forum, I chose it simply to renew my CCNA. At the same time, I was prepping for the CISSP and when I previewed the Sec exam, I saw some information that I thought would cross over with my primary cert pursuit. So I killed two birds with one stone by renewing my CCNA and still kinda sorta studying a CISSP related domain.

    Now long term view, I took this position because I wanted to beef up my security knowledge but intend to return to a networking position in the future. So my intention after the CISSP is to go back to pursue the CCNP. Hopefully by then, I'll be hunting for networking jobs because possessing a CCNP without working in a networking position can actually hurt you. I had a friend who went the same route I'm going through right now (he actually inspired this career move) and he had a little trouble moving over to a LAN shop mainly because people feared paying for a CCNP whose knowledge wasn't fresh. I've read around that having a CCNP without commensurate networking experience on your resume can be even worse. So if you're not in a network shop currently, I'd also recommend going for a CCNA flavor to renew.
    Spicy :cool: Mentor the future! Be a CyberPatriot!
  • TurgonTurgon Posts: 6,313Banned
    thedrama wrote: »
    Your right. But, how about if you couldn't be able to be much experienced and sit still for about 15 months?

    Well back in 2003 I took on a datacentre that was a mess, previously *run* by someone who didn't have a CCNA. He was fired, I straightened out what I could and left. 18 months later the company folded. Since then he has learned from his mistakes and runs a successful hosting company surrounding himself with people who *do* know what they are doing. Learn to put yourself over well and you will get a chance with a company that will give you some useful exposure. Remember, a lot of IT is lies. You make a promise you can't keep to get the business, then you need someone in there to try and keep them! A sensible company realises this and will give people who try a break. Find one.
  • xbuzzxbuzz Posts: 122Member
    From reading the forums and searching these kinds of topics for past week, I think it's safe to say that decisions like these (whether to go straight to CCNP, or CCNA:security) etc are all wildly influenced by personal circumstances. It seems that alot of people (with alot of experience) have differing opinions. Some say going CCNP route is best, some say generalizing with the other CCNAs first is best and most cite personal experiences, and no one opinion seems wrong.

    I think that part of becoming successfull in this business, might be the ability to decide for yourself what routes are best for yourself at any given time, and the drive to get jobs where you can get into the areas you want. Look at yourself and what you want. Look at the tools available to you (time, money, family circumstances etc) and look at the opportunities you have around you, and you'll come up with the right decision for yourself.

    I know i'm asking all these questions myself. For me, i'll probably go CCNP first after I finished my CCNA, as I have the time atm to knock it out in short order (hopefully), then once I get a job, or while looking, I can get the CCNA:Security, Voice, Wireless etc and see which area I really want to get into.
  • thedramathedrama Posts: 291Member
    Turgon wrote: »
    Well back in 2003 I took on a datacentre that was a mess, previously *run* by someone who didn't have a CCNA. He was fired, I straightened out what I could and left. 18 months later the company folded. Since then he has learned from his mistakes and runs a successful hosting company surrounding himself with people who *do* know what they are doing. Learn to put yourself over well and you will get a chance with a company that will give you some useful exposure. Remember, a lot of IT is lies. You make a promise you can't keep to get the business, then you need someone in there to try and keep them! A sensible company realises this and will give people who try a break. Find one.

    All your answers (other people also) contribute a lot. Its a good thing to hear certain responses from the people experienced. However, conditions
    become the key in prior to these beneficial suggestions.
    Im highly anxious about in these days depending on approaching renewal day of the certificate.(20 months) Yet, no definite path to take. The worse thing is i have been wasting my time at home due to lack of employment which gives me a deadly frustration. Within, expectations fade away, purposes get lost and do not know how to say how desperate and numb in that time.

    As a result, even though the most important thing is the fact that how much skilled and experienced you are in the field, my situation forces me to renew the certificate as soon as i can. This haste ruins my whole plan as a result.
    Monster PC specs(Packard Bell VR46) : Intel Celeron Dual-Core 1.2 GHz CPU , 4096 MB DDR3 RAM, Intel Media Graphics (R) 4 Family with IntelGMA 4500 M HD graphics. :lol:

    5 year-old laptop PC specs(Toshiba Satellite A210) : AMD Athlon 64 x2 1.9 GHz CPU, ATI Radeon X1200 128 MB Video Memory graphics card, 3072 MB 667 Mhz DDR2 RAM. (1 stick 2 gigabytes and 1 stick 1 gigabytes)


  • higherhohigherho Posts: 882Member
    If your career is in networking then get the CCNP. If networking is what you want to do for the rest of your life get the CCNP and then CCIE. Right now I'm working with a lot of servers and some networking equipment (VPN, Layer 3 switches, and a firewall). My exposure is enough to get me a CCNA but my exposure to the servers is enough to get me a MCITP :EA (of course with a lot of studding lol). I figured I will go down the Microsoft route first because I want to have a solid understanding of Microsoft servers and since I am gaining so much experience with it now I figured it would be easier for me.

    My future goal is to be a full time networker. After I'm done with the Microsoft stuff I'm going to be getting my CCNA and going up from their.
  • chmorinchmorin Posts: 1,446Member ■■■■■□□□□□
    This is pretty much what I suggest people at the associate level cert/experience to do.

    Step 1) Get your CCNA
    Step 2) Get your CCNA level job
    Step 3) Take a peak at the CCNA specialties. Find out if you like voice, security, wireless, or otherwise more than route/switch.
    Step 4) Attempt any CCNA specialties that interest you.
    Step 5) If you get a new CCNA specialty, attempt to get job experience that compliments it.
    Step 6) Move onward to the professional level of your desire.
    Currently Pursuing
    WGU (BS in IT Network Administration) - 52%| CCIE:Voice Written - 0% (0/200 Hours)
    mikej412 wrote:
    Cisco Networking isn't just a job, it's a Lifestyle.
  • instant000instant000 Posts: 1,745Member
    thedrama wrote: »
    I got almost all resources for CCNP Route. However, someone who posted a topic related to CCNA Security in recent days in here left me indecisive.

    Don't let someone else deter you from your goals. If you got the materials for ROUTE, then study that. Especially fresh off the CCNA, that's one of the best times to be tackling it, as it'll be an addition to what you already know.
    As a very long-time CCNA certified and have repeated CCNA topics two or three times in order to be prepared well to the higher certs, i am curious about if what happens i go for
    CCNA Security first rather than CCNP Route. Is it really much easier to obtain the Security
    than CCNP Route cert?

    LOL. CCNA Security is indeed easy. But like other posters have said, it doesn't make sense in your situation, considering that you say that you already have materials for ROUTE. (Really, what do you need beyond GNS3 , the ROUTE Lab Manual, some kind of book, access to cisco.com, and some time? besides the book, you can get the rest for free)
    Any ideas?

    I posted my ideas above.

    But, as another poster stated, it's really your decision. I just kinda question how you'd let what someone else's doing affect you, when, as the other poster stated, the 'NA specializations are still at that "associate" level. And, unless you need it for work, might not differentiate you that much.
    Currently Working: CCIE R&S
    LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/lewislampkin (Please connect: Just say you're from TechExams.Net!)
  • thedramathedrama Posts: 291Member
    instant000 wrote: »
    Don't let someone else deter you from your goals. If you got the materials for ROUTE, then study that. Especially fresh off the CCNA, that's one of the best times to be tackling it, as it'll be an addition to what you already know.



    LOL. CCNA Security is indeed easy. But like other posters have said, it doesn't make sense in your situation, considering that you say that you already have materials for ROUTE. (Really, what do you need beyond GNS3 , the ROUTE Lab Manual, some kind of book, access to cisco.com, and some time? besides the book, you can get the rest for free)



    I posted my ideas above.

    But, as another poster stated, it's really your decision. I just kinda question how you'd let what someone else's doing affect you, when, as the other poster stated, the 'NA specializations are still at that "associate" level. And, unless you need it for work, might not differentiate you that much.

    Do not worry about it. Im not that kind of person who moves as what other people dictated. However, my concern is a little different. As you have told, i got all materials for the CCNP Route, though, i couldn't find a hole to go through because of the crazily detailed content. that's why
    i considered to step back and to contribute my CCNA renewal at the same time lengthen the duration of renewal with stepping forward, i thought
    giving a chance to security first.
    Monster PC specs(Packard Bell VR46) : Intel Celeron Dual-Core 1.2 GHz CPU , 4096 MB DDR3 RAM, Intel Media Graphics (R) 4 Family with IntelGMA 4500 M HD graphics. :lol:

    5 year-old laptop PC specs(Toshiba Satellite A210) : AMD Athlon 64 x2 1.9 GHz CPU, ATI Radeon X1200 128 MB Video Memory graphics card, 3072 MB 667 Mhz DDR2 RAM. (1 stick 2 gigabytes and 1 stick 1 gigabytes)


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