How did you study for the security exam? Or how are you studying for it?

JasionoJasiono ■■■■□□□□□□ Posts: 896Member ■■■■□□□□□□
I need to come up with ways to study for this and other exams. I've always had a tough time reading something and testing well on it.

It seems to me as if everyone else can just read a book all the way through once and pass the test. This isn't something I can do.


So what do you do? Are you a person that can just read a book and pass a test on it?

I heard that when answering the practice questions to answer them in a way that shows you why the wrong answers are wrong and why the right one is correct.

Anything else?

Comments

  • Carl_S_901Carl_S_901 Posts: 105Member
    Jasiono wrote: »
    I need to come up with ways to study for this and other exams. I've always had a tough time reading something and testing well on it.

    It seems to me as if everyone else can just read a book all the way through once and pass the test. This isn't something I can do.


    So what do you do? Are you a person that can just read a book and pass a test on it?

    I heard that when answering the practice questions to answer them in a way that shows you why the wrong answers are wrong and why the right one is correct.

    Anything else?

    Some of it may depend on what kind of learner you are. I'm not sure if you've ever heard about being a Visual, Auditory, or Tactile learner. If not, do some googling on that phrase. Add 'test' to the google and you will find a bunch of short quizzes/tests you use to determine your learning style. Go ahead and set up a temporary e-mail account because a lot of these will probably want to e-mail you the results.

    I found that I am a combination of the 3 but slightly slanted toward tactile/visual. Other people may find themselves clearly in one camp or another.

    For example, someone is is associated heavily as an auditory learner will get great benefit out of watching (and of course listening) to the Professor Messer videos on Security+.
    Carl S.

    Check out my personal certification journey blog
    http://carlscertjourney.wordpress.com/
  • Carl_S_901Carl_S_901 Posts: 105Member
    Jasiono wrote: »
    So what do you do? Are you a person that can just read a book and pass a test on it?

    I heard that when answering the practice questions to answer them in a way that shows you why the wrong answers are wrong and why the right one is correct.

    Anything else?


    Another thing I wanted to add:

    Books are going to be inevitable in the certification process but one thing I would recommend is to consider all the different books out there. What may be the best book for me may not be the best book for you. Try reading a sample from several Security+ books and see which author grabs YOU the most.
    Carl S.

    Check out my personal certification journey blog
    http://carlscertjourney.wordpress.com/
  • c0vjekc0vjek ■□□□□□□□□□ Posts: 4Registered Users ■□□□□□□□□□
    I did though Army's elearning which was interactive and had practice questions and practice test at the end.

    Like Carl_S said, it depends on what kind of learner you are.
    For me it needs to be interactive.
  • DarrilDarril Posts: 1,588Member
    As others have said, people learn differently, but here's how I study for an exam.

    First, I get the objectives to see what's familiar and what's new to me.

    If the exam is not new, I look for books and pay attention to thoughtful reviews to get an idea of what is working for others. I almost always get two or more sources for a certification.

    Depending on the topic, I may also build labs and get my hands on the product and go through how it works. For example, I'm currently learning SQL Server 2012, so I have it running on Server 2008 as a virtual machine on my Windows 7 system. This allows me to play, and if I break it, I just rebuild it. For Security+, there aren't many topics that require hands on so a lab isn't needed for me.

    As I read through a book, I inevitably come across something that isn't clear to me, or that raises a question. I then do Internet searches to get a better understanding of the topic. Occassionally, I may post a question to a forum to get someone else's insight into the topic. Through this process, I take notes to help me understand the topic. I find that by typing the question, and then seeking the answer, it helps solidify the knowledge for me.

    As I get closer to the exam date, I often review practice test questions. These may be practice test questions in the books I've bought, or practice test questions through another reputable source.

    I sometimes read how someone can read a book in a week or less and pass a test, and I have to admit I'm a little amazed. I always get distracted. Either I get curious about a topic I want more information about, or just get tired and find myself rereading the same paragraph over and over.

    It's a great thing that we're all different though. Otherwise, it would be a pretty boring world.

    HTH,
  • quinnyflyquinnyfly Posts: 243Member
    The way I do the studying goes like this:

    I personally go chapter-by-chapter <perhaps as the author intented> I read a paragraph then read it again in an attempt to illicit the pertinent points. I then grab my highlighter and begin to highlight what I believe to be the important points. After this, I transcribe these points in MS Word to my lappy and then read all of the content I just compiled from the chapter.

    Then I go and do the practice exam from the same textbook, checking my results will then determine my next move. Obviously, if I am not really grasping the topics I will complete further research via my other text books, google - (although be careful what and who you believe with what’s on the net?)… and various other resources.

    More specifically, I always purchase at least two, or even three books on the same cert for good cross reference. I tend to use them along side my choosen main text to increase my exposure to the subject matter. I also read the reviews about any books that I may choose and also have a little look at what sample content is offered on Amazon, this gives you a more informed choice whether to use it or not!

    It is difficult to ascertain what points to note and not! This seems to be a skill that comes with practice, and perhaps a few rounds of the practice exams will soon enough let you know what you should pay more attention too. I don't know that there are any hard and fast answers for this one, I sometimes imagine that if I were writting the exam, "what points about this topic should I test?" Then it more or less becomes apparent soon enough after a few tries at some practice exams.

    No doubt we all have different learning and input modes, (sounds like a bloody computer!!) and what works for some may not for others. This is the technique I use and it has done me well so far.

    I would recommend that you do as many practice exams as possible, perhaps at a minimum, this may allow you to deduce any weaknesses in your knowledge of the exam topics listed in the exam objectives.

    I suggest you find authors you like, know their writting style and relate to their tutilage, if you are self-studying (as have I for all of mine), I believe you need good qaulity material that works for you. Many have stated that we recommend Darril Gibson's book for the Sec+, and I agree, although having said that, I did come across some questions in the exam that were not addressed in his book. Again, this is why most of us will tell you to use several sources. It's hard to find just one that covers all the exam objectives.

    I also print off all the exam objectives and tick them off as I hopefully satisfy each one, the idea here of course, is to ensure that I have met the exam criteria and content.

    I hope this is helpful.
    Steve
    The Wings of Technology
  • whatthehellwhatthehell Posts: 920Member
    Darril wrote: »
    As others have said, people learn differently, but here's how I study for an exam.

    First, I get the objectives to see what's familiar and what's new to me.

    If the exam is not new, I look for books and pay attention to thoughtful reviews to get an idea of what is working for others. I almost always get two or more sources for a certification.

    Depending on the topic, I may also build labs and get my hands on the product and go through how it works. For example, I'm currently learning SQL Server 2012, so I have it running on Server 2008 as a virtual machine on my Windows 7 system. This allows me to play, and if I break it, I just rebuild it. For Security+, there aren't many topics that require hands on so a lab isn't needed for me.

    As I read through a book, I inevitably come across something that isn't clear to me, or that raises a question. I then do Internet searches to get a better understanding of the topic. Occassionally, I may post a question to a forum to get someone else's insight into the topic. Through this process, I take notes to help me understand the topic. I find that by typing the question, and then seeking the answer, it helps solidify the knowledge for me.

    As I get closer to the exam date, I often review practice test questions. These may be practice test questions in the books I've bought, or practice test questions through another reputable source.

    I sometimes read how someone can read a book in a week or less and pass a test, and I have to admit I'm a little amazed. I always get distracted. Either I get curious about a topic I want more information about, or just get tired and find myself rereading the same paragraph over and over.

    It's a great thing that we're all different though. Otherwise, it would be a pretty boring world.

    HTH,


    +1 Totally agree with this.

    1. Objectives
    2. Study Guide (Darril's guides for the Sec+ are legendary on these forums)
    3. Practice Question (Darril actually has practice questions for the Sec + too)
    4. Create my own flash cards for areas I am weak in, or practice questions I keep missing.
    5. Any guides or notes from these forums.
    6. Rest, lots of sleep, and/or movie/vid games the day before the test to relax mentally.

    Good luck!
    2017 Goals:
    [ ] Security + [ ] 74-409 [ ] CEH
    Future Goals:
    TBD
  • TheCudderTheCudder ■■■□□□□□□□ Posts: 147Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    I'm studying by reading "CompTIA Security+ SY0-301 Authorized Cert Guide, Deluxe Edition (2nd Edition)" (by David L Prowse) & I also purchased Darril's kindle practice questions. I stuck with David L Prowes's A+ study guide as it really did well with prep'ing me for A+
    B.S. Information Technology Management | CompTIA A+ | CompTIA Security+ | Graduate Certificate in Information Assurance (In Progress)
  • MrXpertMrXpert ■■■□□□□□□□ Posts: 586Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    With most books I have read I cannot just purely read it and hope to pass but with Darrill's book that is an exception. He has the gift of writing that many others in his line of work can only dream about.

    I did find that while studying towards my other certs, video based training was very helpful as it can help you absorb the info better especially as it has an almost classroom type feel. Trainsignal and CBT nuggets are the leading providers but it comes at a price. Other methods of learning I find useful are making my own flash cards, writing my own notes and even reciting stuff while driving or taking a shower(horrible thought I know).

    Prash
    I'm an Xpert at nothing apart from remembering useless information that nobody else cares about.
  • shellee1983shellee1983 ■■□□□□□□□□ Posts: 71Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    I used Darril Gibsons Security + study guide along with some brain **** and a PDF file that has the "actual" questions and answers on it.
  • quinnyflyquinnyfly Posts: 243Member
    TheCudder wrote: »
    I'm studying by reading "CompTIA Security+ SY0-301 Authorized Cert Guide, Deluxe Edition (2nd Edition)" (by David L Prowse) & I also purchased Darril's kindle practice questions. I stuck with David L Prowes's A+ study guide as it really did well with prep'ing me for A+

    Funny you mention "while taking a shower," I have my notes in plastic sleaves plastered all over the oustide of the shower, I read them through the glass........ (I believe I have a knowledgeable shower).....well you get the idea..:) Strange thing is, by the time the Mrs gets out, sometimes she'll ask me something about the content or tel me what she just learned from it..."great test prep reinforcemnet in my book!!"
    The Wings of Technology
  • cruffincruffin ■□□□□□□□□□ Posts: 13Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    ... along with some brain **** and a PDF file that has the "actual" questions and answers on it.
    If you're talking about cheating, memorizing actual exam questions that have been illegally copied and given to you...


    Well, that's pathetic!
    If that's true, people who do that are the reason the certifications are sometimes looked down upon or don't have as much "value" as they should.

    Hopefully you'll be exposed when you actually have to use this "knowledge" on the job, you know when you actually have to know the material, and not just memorize questions and answers.



    Hopefully, I misread or misunderstood your post. If that is the case, I apologize.
  • MrXpertMrXpert ■■■□□□□□□□ Posts: 586Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    I used Darril Gibsons Security + study guide along with some brain **** and a PDF file that has the "actual" questions and answers on it.

    When you say actual and put quotation marks around it does that a special way of saying they are real questions but reworded slightly? or are they direct brain ****? or do you mean their not really the real thing but just try to act like they are in terms of style? My understanding of a brain **** is copied questions and answers from the real exam.
    In any case you will find that every IT exam board whether it is CompTIA, Cisco, Microsoft etc all frown heavily upon this type of thing. You can also loose your cert if discovered. Why bother cheating when you could study honestly and gain it honestly and sleep well at night knowing you put in genuine hard work to get it.
    I'm an Xpert at nothing apart from remembering useless information that nobody else cares about.
  • TheCudderTheCudder ■■■□□□□□□□ Posts: 147Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    I used Darril Gibsons Security + study guide along with some brain **** and a PDF file that has the "actual" questions and answers on it.

    Why spend money on a legit study guide if you're just going to take the lazy route brain **** the exam?
    B.S. Information Technology Management | CompTIA A+ | CompTIA Security+ | Graduate Certificate in Information Assurance (In Progress)
  • cmitchell_00cmitchell_00 Too many to name Posts: 242Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    I studying by reading CompTIA Security+ by Darril Gibson and used Lab Sims from my school. Then read allot of things from the TechExams group, David L Prowse and the web (i.e. Google) etc... Then, I re-read Darril's book twice and made flashcards for the exam and touched on extra areas where I felt weak. I believe this help me pass with an good score but, the exam is from studying the material and learning it while using common sense.
  • ResevenReseven ■■■□□□□□□□ Posts: 237Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    I used Darril's book. Bought it for $10 on Amazon. Best $10 I ever spent on a book.
    I must have recommended that book to over a dozen people since I passed.
    Still remains my favorite book out of library I've purchased over my years of study. I'm using his Sybex book for my 646 right now.
    Pain Gauge - my electro-industrial music project
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