Which Cert Track?

I have been asked by my colleagues to recommend a Linux cert track for our team. The skill ranges from little or no exposure to linux to a few that are comfortable doing basic sysadmin jobs on linux servers. So I was wondering if I should recommend LPIC1-2 or the RHCSA?

Also any books that you all would recommend for the listed exams?

Comments

  • techinthewoodstechinthewoods Member Posts: 96 ■■□□□□□□□□
    Hello Chaser,

    I'm no expert but I will share my experience thus far in hopes that it may help.

    I recently studied for, and passed, Linux+ and I am now studying for RHCSA.

    I'm using the VCT RHCSA video tutorial by Kenny Armstrong while I wait for my two RHCSA books to arrive. I must say, I am much happier with what I am learning from the VCT RHCSA videos than from the other vids I used to prep for Linux+. It could just be me, but I feel like I would be further ahead if I had just started with this vid series and the RHCSA prep from the beginning. The Linux+ was 4 certs for the price of one though, so it was hard to pass up.

    Does your company use mainly Red Hat?
  • chaser7783chaser7783 Member Posts: 154
    We currently don't run Red Hat linux. We support around 2400 linux embedded devices. Not many of us are comfortable remoting into these devices and working on them. Even thought LPI cover a wide range of linux topics I just get the feeling RHCSA will cover deeper into linux and is a more recognizable cert. I may be way off by that statement, but I am here for guidance icon_cool.gif
  • techinthewoodstechinthewoods Member Posts: 96 ■■□□□□□□□□
    I agree from my limited exposure that RHCSA would be the way to go. Sounds like you have a nice job, with access to 2400 linux devices.
  • onesaintonesaint Member Posts: 801
    The LPIC-1 gives a very fundamental view of Linux and some distros (mostly RHEL / SUSE) from what I've read and watched. It's very much an intro to Linux. The RHCSA, though it's focus is only on a single distro, does in fact go much deeper into what a Systems Admin should know ( the RHCE covers the rest of what a SA should know). Those skills once learned can be easily translated to other distribution of Linux.

    I would suggest Linux CBT for video training, and Michael Jang's RHCSA/RHCE book for reading. The book covers many basic ideas about linux while going more in depth regarding certification essentials. The videos seem quite in depth as well, but I haven't yet had the chance to view them other than the demos.

    A good number of resources can be found here, sans the linux CBTs which is here.


    Techinthewoods, what are the certs awarded for the LPIC other than Linux+?
    Work in progress: picking up Postgres, elastisearch, redis, Cloudera, & AWS.
    Next up: eventually the RHCE and to start blogging again.

    Control Protocol; my blog of exam notes and IT randomness
  • AceRimmerAceRimmer Users Awaiting Email Confirmation Posts: 41 ■■□□□□□□□□
    Actually, LPIC goes more wide / covers more area then RH certs. RH requires practical kowledge, but less is covered.
    Not any particular distro is covered in LPIC, but you need to know basic differences between rpm and dpkg based distros (mostly package management and runlevel management differences).

    With LPIC-1 you also get Novell CLA (SLES 11) and Datacenter Technical Specialist.

    From what I've seen VTC RHCSA covers pretty much all objectives.
  • techinthewoodstechinthewoods Member Posts: 96 ■■□□□□□□□□
    onesaint wrote: »
    Techinthewoods, what are the certs awarded for the LPIC other than Linux+?

    I took the Comptia Linux+ exams powered by LPI. Passing the two Linux+ exams earned me:

    1. Comptia Linux+
    2. LPIC-1
    3. Novell CLA (Certified Linux Administrator)
    4. Novell Data Center Technical Specialist

    More info on the deal can be found here.

    Hope that info helps someone.
  • ptilsenptilsen Member Posts: 2,835 ■■■■■■■■■■
    As someone who infrequently works with Linux and mostly just knows enough cause some damage, let me give an outsiders' perspective:

    If there were two Windows-related cert tracks that offered valuable, but distinct skillsets, I would get them both. For example, I will probably pursue MCITP: Exchange Messaging Administration sometime after completing MCITP:EA. Exchange isn't Windows, of course, but if there were another more generic Windows track that complemented MCITP:EA without duplicating it, I'd get it.

    So, from my outsider's perspective, I would go down both tracks if I were wanting to specialize in Linux.
    Working B.S., Computer Science
    Complete: 55/120 credits SPAN 201, LIT 100, ETHS 200, AP Lang, MATH 120, WRIT 231, ICS 140, MATH 215, ECON 202, ECON 201, ICS 141, MATH 210, LING 111, ICS 240
    In progress: CLEP US GOV,
    Next up: MATH 211, ECON 352, ICS 340
  • onesaintonesaint Member Posts: 801
    I took the Comptia Linux+ exams powered by LPI. Passing the two Linux+ exams earned me:

    1. Comptia Linux+
    2. LPIC-1
    3. Novell CLA (Certified Linux Administrator)
    4. Novell Data Center Technical Specialist

    More info on the deal can be found here.

    Hope that info helps someone.

    Thanks, Tech!




    @chaser7783: This thread might be of interest as well:
    http://www.techexams.net/forums/lpi-rhce-sair/69009-rhcsa-linux.html
    Work in progress: picking up Postgres, elastisearch, redis, Cloudera, & AWS.
    Next up: eventually the RHCE and to start blogging again.

    Control Protocol; my blog of exam notes and IT randomness
  • UnixGuyUnixGuy Are we having fun yet? Mod Posts: 4,251 Mod
    I would recommend RHCSA any day. You need your team to be comfortable working with Linux, then this cert will give them a practical exposure. Learning other linux flavors will be easier :)


    This is my recommendation: RHCSA then RHCE.


    If you have training budget, then Red Hat official training courses are excellent!
    Certs: GPEN, GCFA, CISM, CRISC, RHCE
    In Progress: MBA
  • chaser7783chaser7783 Member Posts: 154
    Thanks for all the input everyone. I will defiantly push for the RHCSA. I think in the long run it will be a stronger cert, and provide our team with a deeper understanding of the internal workings of linux.
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