3600 router/GNS3 question

beach5563beach5563 Posts: 344Member ■■■□□□□□□□
I was wondering if I purchased a 3600 router to use with GNS3 would I be able to use it to do some basic CCNA level switching with it. I see in GNS3 tutorial that you can configure it to do some switching. Is there anyone who is doing this. I dont have a lot of money adn I like the GNS3 concept because I can get a lot more done with less in a way. Later on I plan on expanding and maybe getting some switches for CCNP level stuff but it would be cool if I could just get one good router, use the IOS from it in GNS3 for routing stuff. If I cant use it for switching I may have to just use packet tracer for switching. Just wondering. I already have GNS3 downloaded and all just need to finish setting it up.
Thanks

Comments

  • fsanyeefsanyee Posts: 171Member
    Switches in packet tracer know all the commands what you need for CCNA.
  • alxxalxx Posts: 755Member
    using real hardware is more fun

    why a 3600 ? the 3640's and 3660's are largish, noisy and only the 3660 can run 12.4t and only with max mem and max flash.


    better off getting a few switches (2 or more 3550) and use gsn3 for the routers
    Goals CCNA by dec 2013, CCNP by end of 2014
  • fsanyeefsanyee Posts: 171Member
    using real hardware is more fun if you can afford it. i think he choose 3600 because with that he can use nm-16esw modules. (but this is not support all the switch features and commands) 3640 can run 12.4 ios if he doesn't have a lot money as he said, 2x3550 are not an option. using packet tracer is enough for ccna, and its free....
  • bermovickbermovick Posts: 1,134Member ■■■■□□□□□□
    For CCNA, forget the 3550, just get a couple 2950's. 2 would suffice (3 would be a bit better)

    Cisco Catalyst (WS-C2950-12) 12-Ports External Switch Managed stackable | eBay
    Latest Completed: CISSP

    Current goal: Dunno
  • alxxalxx Posts: 755Member
    3640 can run 12.4 but not 12.4t which cisco recommends for ccna.

    If he's going on to ccnp a couple of 3550's + a couple of 2950's depending on budget.
    Still won't cover everything but can use online labs to cover the private vlans when you get to CCNP(switch)

    For a cheap getting started router a 1721/1751, can run 12.4t and can get them for $10 to $50 depending on ram, wic etc
    but if on a tight budget, gsn3 + a 2950 switch or two or just stick with packet chaser.


    Other option is use the free online labs like freeccnaworkbook or packet life and not buy the hardware yourself
    Free CCNA Workbook » Free Cisco CCNA Lab Access via Online
    https://packetlife.net/lab/

    Can pickup 2950's from less than $10 , a lot lot cheaper than nm-16esw's (at least around here)
    Goals CCNA by dec 2013, CCNP by end of 2014
  • beach5563beach5563 Posts: 344Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    alxx wrote: »
    3640 can run 12.4 but not 12.4t which cisco recommends for ccna.

    If he's going on to ccnp a couple of 3550's + a couple of 2950's depending on budget.
    Still won't cover everything but can use online labs to cover the private vlans when you get to CCNP(switch)

    For a cheap getting started router a 1721/1751, can run 12.4t and can get them for $10 to $50 depending on ram, wic etc
    but if on a tight budget, gsn3 + a 2950 switch or two or just stick with packet chaser.


    Other option is use the free online labs like freeccnaworkbook or packet life and not buy the hardware yourself
    Free CCNA Workbook » Free Cisco CCNA Lab Access via Online
    https://packetlife.net/lab/

    Can pickup 2950's from less than $10 , a lot lot cheaper than nm-16esw's (at least around here)
    Thanks everybody. I said 3600 because I saw that you could do some switching with them, I did not know which particular 3600 model though. Yea the 1721 would be a good option I think and 2 2950s. I will probably add more when I get to CCNP level. A lot of people say Packet Tracer is enough for CCNA but I also seee people always talking about real equipment and all. Thats whay I was saying a router + GNS3 + 2 switches. Im thinking of getting a 1721 and copying that IOS over to GNS3. If i cant get my hands on any equipment I guess I will have to just use packet tracer. Thanks so much everyone.
  • NetworkVeteranNetworkVeteran Posts: 2,338Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    alxx wrote: »
    For a cheap getting started router a 1721/1751, can run 12.4t and can get them for $10 to $50 depending on ram, wic etc but if on a tight budget, gsn3...
    GNS is not just for those on a tight budget, it's also for those who want to study more efficiently so they can master networking technologies and pass their exams more quickly than those setting up their own racks.

    You do not have to waste time ID'ing what equipment to buy, who to buy it from, ordering it, waiting for it to arrive, cabling it up, and troubleshooting physical issues like bent connectors or bad cables that have no relevance to the CCxx exam series. You can also quickly setup a wide range of topologies and complete labs that require more routers. I have a friend who wanted to pass their CCNP--they wasted two weeks setting up a power-consuming, noise-making lab that attracts toddlers. :p

    Renting rack time is another alternative. For $30 I got 4hrs/day of rack time with two 2950s and two 3550s for one month.

    (Then again, if you're new to networking there's some benefit to "getting" crossover, rolled, straight-through, knowing where those console / aux ports are, what the LEDs look like, how to initially configure a Cisco device, etc. I wouldn't discourage you from getting or renting at least one Cisco device to see what the big deal is. Especially if it excites/motivates you!)
  • beach5563beach5563 Posts: 344Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    GNS is not just for those on a tight budget, it's also for those who want to study more efficiently so they can master networking technologies and pass their exams more quickly than those setting up their own racks.

    You do not have to waste time ID'ing what equipment to buy, who to buy it from, ordering it, waiting for it to arrive, cabling it up, and troubleshooting physical issues like bent connectors or bad cables that have no relevance to the CCxx exam series. You can also quickly setup a wide range of topologies and complete labs that require more routers. I have a friend who wanted to pass their CCNP--they wasted two weeks setting up a power-consuming, noise-making lab that attracts toddlers. :p

    Renting rack time is another alternative. For $30 I got 4hrs/day of rack time with two 2950s and two 3550s for one month.

    (Then again, if you're new to networking there's some benefit to "getting" crossover, rolled, straight-through, knowing where those console / aux ports are, what the LEDs look like, how to initially configure a Cisco device, etc. I wouldn't discourage you from getting or renting at least one Cisco device to see what the big deal is. Especially if it excites/motivates you!)

    Yea that makes sens, actuall i've atteneded quite a few ccna and a couple of ccnp classes in the past so I pretty much get the whole hardware idea and all. Plus i've worked in the telecommunications field for a while and have worked around cisco switches and actually have done some basic network conectivity troubleshooting and all as far as making sure users have a good ip address from switch ports and I hung around the network guys as much as I could. I think just having one router and a couple of switches can get me through CCNA. I just would love to just get one router that has a module that I could do switching on in GNS3 and that would be cool. I have taken the test twice before years ago and I pretty much had good hands on experience from the class I took. I kind of like the idea of having 1 or 2 pieces of cisco equipment around though :)
  • NetworkVeteranNetworkVeteran Posts: 2,338Member ■■■■■■■■□□

    This is the CCNP TSHOOT lab, implemented in GNS3. Simple lab topologies take 3-5 minutes to configure. This one takes closer to 30 minutes. Still, imagine what it would take (time/money) to accurately recreate the full topology using physical equipment!
  • beach5563beach5563 Posts: 344Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    This is the CCNP TSHOOT lab, implemented in GNS3. Simple lab topologies take 3-5 minutes to configure. This one takes closer to 30 minutes. Still, imagine what it would take (time/money) to accurately recreate the full topology using physical equipment!
    Yea thats a nice setup for GNS3, hell if I can get this kind of setups going I'll just deal with GNS3 for a while. Once I get working again I will probably be around real equipment anyway. Thanks I like that.
  • beach5563beach5563 Posts: 344Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    This is the CCNP TSHOOT lab, implemented in GNS3. Simple lab topologies take 3-5 minutes to configure. This one takes closer to 30 minutes. Still, imagine what it would take (time/money) to accurately recreate the full topology using physical equipment!
    So im assuming you used the router as a switch or you had external switches added into GNS3.
  • bermovickbermovick Posts: 1,134Member ■■■■□□□□□□
    beach5563 wrote: »
    So im assuming you used the router as a switch or you had external switches added into GNS3.

    And that you skipped the layer 3 etherchannel between DSW1 and DSW2.
    Latest Completed: CISSP

    Current goal: Dunno
  • NetworkVeteranNetworkVeteran Posts: 2,338Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    bermovick wrote: »
    And that you skipped the layer 3 etherchannel between DSW1 and DSW2.

    Did not! I created an etherchannel, assigned it to a special VLAN, created an SVI, and then added an IP. Voila! "L3 Etherchannel". :p

    Obviously, that's a hack, and GNS3 is much better at simulating routers than switches.
  • alxxalxx Posts: 755Member
    Hey beach watch this

    CBT Nuggets
    Goals CCNA by dec 2013, CCNP by end of 2014
  • beach5563beach5563 Posts: 344Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    alxx wrote: »
    Hey beach watch thisCBT Nuggets
    Thanks alxx, I saw this a while back its real good. Whats cool is you can do some virtualization stuff too I think. With GNS3 you're actually seeing what some engineers see working in a NOC anyway, I mean you connect to the routers and switches, you can use wireshark, you get the feel of virtualization too.
  • alxxalxx Posts: 755Member
    Network Veteran I don't see setting up network equipment in my home lab as a waste of time as I don't work in a NOC or environment where I would get to use cisco gear/standard commercial gear.
    Currently work on embedded systems/systems development. and as electronics developer.

    Start a new job on the 16th - fpga develpment (vhdl design/ip block integration and testing) for network/system interconnects/add in cards. First project is get one of these up and running with our test system 16-lane PCI Express Gen 2 FPGA board with linux. Tons of docs to read

    beach5563
    Can use wireshark regardless its a handy tool.

    Try one of the free online labs like freecnaworkbook.com or packet life if you haven't already.

    hooking up gsn3 to switches/hardware
    GNS3 - How to connect GNS3 to a real router or switch and to the internet - YouTube
    Connecting real routers/switches to your GNS3 virtual lab - YouTube
    Goals CCNA by dec 2013, CCNP by end of 2014
  • beach5563beach5563 Posts: 344Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    alxx wrote: »
    Network Veteran I don't see setting up network equipment in my home lab as a waste of time as I don't work in a NOC or environment where I would get to use cisco gear/standard commercial gear.
    Currently work on embedded systems/systems development. and as electronics developer.

    Start a new job on the 16th - fpga develpment (vhdl design/ip block integration and testing) for network/system interconnects/add in cards. First project is get one of these up and running with our test system 16-lane PCI Express Gen 2 FPGA board with linux. Tons of docs to read

    beach5563
    Can use wireshark regardless its a handy tool.

    Try one of the free online labs like freecnaworkbook.com or packet life if you haven't already.

    hooking up gsn3 to switches/hardware
    GNS3 - How to connect GNS3 to a real router or switch and to the internet - YouTube
    Connecting real routers/switches to your GNS3 virtual lab - YouTube

    Thanks alxx, appreciate your input.
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