Would would you do if you feel unappreciated at work?

loss4wordsloss4words Posts: 165Member ■■■□□□□□□□
Hi guys,

I was wondering what would you do if you felt that your hard work isn't recognized by your managers and other people unintentionally get the credit you deserve for one reason or another?

I should say that I really like my job and people I work with. My colleagues are always really nice and give me good advice/help me with projects when I need it. I started working with them a little over 2 years ago while everybody else have been there longer. Over a period of time I slowly started taking over more projects and introducing/implementing my own solutions that improve what we already have.

Unfortunately, my two supervisors are not really tech savy. They're good people and understand the needs of our department and set good expectations for our projects but I can't talk to them about more techy things because they won't know what I'm talking about. However, when they notice something that is good and is an improvement I'm not the person they think of. I feel very depressed by it. I feel underappriciated and that my supervisors don't see how much I bring to our department. Usually our go-to-guy gets all the credit and while he would say if it wasn't something he did they still think highly of him and I feel left out.

I don't know if it would be a good idea to talk to my supervisors about this because I don't know how they'd react. I really wish my hard work didn't go unnoticed. Sometimes I wonder if I should start looking for another job...

Sorry about the rant. What do you guys think?

Comments

  • TheCudderTheCudder Posts: 147Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    I would start by keeping a log of any significant activities/accomplishments and bring them up during your quarterly/semi-annual/annual review. Make it know that you're taking initiative and taking the extra step.
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  • loss4wordsloss4words Posts: 165Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    Thanks, TheCuddler. I think keeping a log is a good idea, I'll try it. Unfortunately during the two years I've worked at this place they haven't done any reviews or performance evaluations.
  • tpatt100tpatt100 Posts: 2,989Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    Send emails when you make a change/improvement in something saying "just an fyi but I did such and such, wanted to keep you aware in case somebody asks any questions" might work.
  • powerfoolpowerfool Senior Member Posts: 1,623Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    We used to send out email messages as part of a immature change management process. We had a distribution list and a mail-enabled public folder as a member, so it could be logged. This brings visibility to your work and it also makes sure that people are aware of changes in the environment.

    At this point, I think that bringing attention to your work is a good idea... but you have been there for two years with no assessment... what do you think you need for your next position, assuming a move wouldn't be lateral? Work on that and then look for a new job, unless something else is keeping you at your current job (excellent benefits, good pay for area, convenience). That is what kind of stinks about my job, even though I do get recognition, if I were to leave this job and I wanted to stay in the area, I would be taking a pay and benefits cut, most likely.
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  • networker050184networker050184 Posts: 11,962Mod Mod
    tpatt100 wrote: »
    Send emails when you make a change/improvement in something saying "just an fyi but I did such and such, wanted to keep you aware in case somebody asks any questions" might work.

    I'd definitely do this if there is not already a change control system for work accountability. Just shoot them an email with a note saying you have completed a task/change/install, whatever it is you do.
    An expert is a man who has made all the mistakes which can be made.
  • ZartanasaurusZartanasaurus Posts: 2,008Member
    How are you able to undertake all of these projects without your supervisors knowing what you're up to?
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  • ahphotoahphoto Posts: 103Member
    tpatt100 wrote: »
    Send emails when you make a change/improvement in something saying "just an fyi but I did such and such, wanted to keep you aware in case somebody asks any questions" might work.

    +1
    That way it will seem more like you're trying to keep everyone informed and in the loop regarding what you've done, without making it seem like you're trying to get attention by dancing in the spotlight.

    There's no I in team, but there's M and E. lol jk.
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  • PlantwizPlantwiz Posts: 5,057Mod Mod
    Every time I see threads like this I wonder what the OP's motives are? Are you worried you will be terminated? If your performing at or above the requirements for your job, why isn't doing the job enough? It may simply be time for a self evaluation. Pull your job description if you don't have a copy handy (HR should) and go over all the things you do.

    Topics similar to this one have gone on in this forum for years. I still hold to if you get your paycheck each week (or two weeks), and you are doing what is asked and many times more than what is asked, and no one is hassling you about your work, why do folks wand/need a pat on the back too?

    Either we do the job we agreed to perform. Or we are not. It's business.

    Of course, this will spawn all the psychology and sociology folks into a frenzy of how 'good managers' are more intune with your well being and blah, blah, blah. The core comes down to, did you agree to do a task for a wage? Yes/NO Are you performing this task as agreed? Yes/No? You have already stated the people you work with are nice, so what more could you want? Go home and hang with family and friends and feel good knowing your doing the work you promised to do and are doing it well. It is not up to the employer to 'make' you feel good.

    If you are truly doing an outstanding job, you should easily be able to market yourself to another company and will be snatched right up. So, the more likely issue is, do you want to stay doing what you are doing? Or do you wish to risk going elsewhere? No one here can make this decision for you. Likely many of us have faced it. Sometimes you stay and enjoy what you do. Sometimes you jump into something new and find out quickly that more money doesn't equal happiness....and sometimes you do get the best of both worlds.

    Do an honest sefl-evaluation.
    Call a meeting with your supervisor if necessary.
    Review what you have done. What you agreed to do. What you have done in excess. What you plan to continue to do and most importantly, how you have saved or made them moeny while you have been with them.
    Propose you new terms (i.e. renegotiate your position/application) and see if there is still a job/position with this company. They may agree and they may not.

    There is no real way to know without discussing it, but make certain you are prepared before going into this meeting. And I don't think this needs to be confrontational by any means. Just business and basic renegotiating (and yes, negotiation happens with and without union or contract work...there is always an implied agreement...so reset the terms).



    BTW - I think sending an e-mail each time you do something will tick them off. I would not do this personally unless you feel your job is in jeopardy, it will make you sound needy and insecure (IMO) and if you were on my team, I'd likely be looking to move you to a new team and a new company. Meet with them and bring your list to discuss the future together. Bombard them with e-mail...I'd recommend against this method as it is childlike and shows weakness (IMO).
    Plantwiz
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  • the_Grinchthe_Grinch Posts: 4,153Member ■■■■■■■■■■
    I have to agree with Plantwiz, you know that you are doing a great job, what does it matter what others think or recognize? What I've always see happen is the person who feels they haven't be recognized goes out of their way to get props and gets them. But then something go wrongs and suddenly the eyes are on you. Sometimes it better to be a number and just improve yourself for your next move (be it at your current company or to a new one). Collect your check and brag to your IT friends about all the stuff you do ;) way safer that way.
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  • erpadminerpadmin Posts: 4,165Member
    Plantwiz wrote: »
    Topics similar to this one have gone on in this forum for years. I still hold to if you get your paycheck each week (or two weeks), and you are doing what is asked and many times more than what is asked, and no one is hassling you about your work, why do folks wand/need a pat on the back too?

    [In my best inner five-year-old...]OOOO, OOOO, I know, I know!! [and so will anyone else who took an Org Behavior course as either an undergrad and/or as part of a MBA/Management-type of program.]

    [Serious voice now...lol.] It has to do with motivation and what motivates an employee. This is between "Need Theory" and "Expectancy Theory" of motivation. With needs [you can google Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs if you want detailed info on this], a manager motivates an individual by address an employee's lower needs, before the higher needs get satisfied. In a nutshell, if an employee is unsatisfied, he will not be motivated. Contrary to your (and believe it or not, my) old schools ways of motivating employees with a paycheck are over. (It really is the crapiest way to manage anyone; because if I, as an employee hate a job, I can just go elsewhere...which to you would be fine, but if you're a manager with a ridiculous amount of turnover...it will be YOU that's looked at...)

    Expectancy theory is pretty much just that...if an employee does well, he/she expects some sort of reward (promotion, pat on the back, a bonus, dinner, whatever....).

    Which now leads into your little cute comment:
    Plantwiz wrote: »
    Of course, this will spawn all the psychology and sociology folks into a frenzy of how 'good managers' are more intune with your well being and blah, blah, blah. The core comes down to, did you agree to do a task for a wage? Yes/NO Are you performing this task as agreed? Yes/No? You have already stated the people you work with are nice, so what more could you want? Go home and hang with family and friends and feel good knowing your doing the work you promised to do and are doing it well. It is not up to the employer to 'make' you feel good

    Hey...all I'm gonna say is this....that psych "crap" that I just spouted above is being taught in schools today. Companies want better managers, and your old school way of thinking is pretty much over and done with. Your company is not the only one paying a wage. Plus...every interview I've ever been on, I've asked "How is advancement within your company handled?" or something along those lines.

    You don't have to like it...I'm very old school in a lot of ways myself. However, I have to stress that motivating people with just a paycheck is no longer gonna fly anymore.

    Edit: To clarify my personal position, I don't need my *blank* *blanked* at work for doing a good job. I do my job, and move on to the next thing. All I care about is doing my job well enough so I can move on to either the next big thing internally or externally. All I'm saying is, I understand where [good] management is heading....
  • itdaddyitdaddy Posts: 2,086Member
    I have been in your shoes then 5 years after highered, my boss got fired..then I got hired.
    keep studying and keep certifying in things you love to do for example

    I am stuyidng CCNP/CCNP-s, CCNP-v and MCITP-EA and linux,
    you have to do things you love and I also finished my BS degree in CS...so prepare for opportunity when it comes.
    but you can't make someone love you you can't make someone appreciate you either...
    you will make it thru. just prepare yourself for success pray a lot I do and hope does come. God does bless hard work in the right area ;)
  • onesaintonesaint Posts: 801Member
    Thanks for the post OP. I actually used it to teach my teenager about how she should adapt and look at a situation as an opportunity when it seems like an issue. We both read over your post and I asked her, what would you do? She replied, "say something, I guess." I said, "really? What good would that do? Your manger doesn't even understand what you're doing because it too technical. This is an opportunity to learn better communication. If you can look at this as a challenge, then you can find a way to communicate what your doing that is so technical, to a non technical manager."

    Honestly, I think that you enjoy the environment you're in, but just aren't communicating well. Your supervisors aren't there to hold your hand and watch your every move. So, if you've completed some huge task, you need to enlighten them as to your accomplishment. Make it as subtle as possible, but communicate it none the less.

    Expecting your supervisors to notice all your accomplishments will unfortunately lead to further disappointment, be it at this company or any other you decide to move to. I personally would look at this as a challenge to see how good I could become at communicating technical tasks (and accomplishments) to non technical management.
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  • networker050184networker050184 Posts: 11,962Mod Mod
    the_Grinch wrote: »
    I have to agree with Plantwiz, you know that you are doing a great job, what does it matter what others think or recognize?

    Career advancement is the first thing that comes to mind. If someone else is getting credit for your hard work chances are they are going to get your raise and promotion also.
    An expert is a man who has made all the mistakes which can be made.
  • tpatt100tpatt100 Posts: 2,989Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    erpadmin wrote: »
    [In my best inner five-year-old...]OOOO, OOOO, I know, I know!! [and so will anyone else who took an Org Behavior course as either an undergrad and/or as part of a MBA/Management-type of program.]

    [Serious voice now...lol.] It has to do with motivation and what motivates an employee. This is between "Need Theory" and "Expectancy Theory" of motivation. With needs [you can google Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs if you want detailed info on this], a manager motivates an individual by address an employee's lower needs, before the higher needs get satisfied. In a nutshell, if an employee is unsatisfied, he will not be motivated. Contrary to your (and believe it or not, my) old schools ways of motivating employees with a paycheck are over. (It really is the crapiest way to manage anyone; because if I, as an employee hate a job, I can just go elsewhere...which to you would be fine, but if you're a manager with a ridiculous amount of turnover...it will be YOU that's looked at...)

    Expectancy theory is pretty much just that...if an employee does well, he/she expects some sort of reward (promotion, pat on the back, a bonus, dinner, whatever....).

    Which now leads into your little cute comment:


    snip.......

    Pretty much the bolded is what I agree with. They did numerous studies on what motivates people and money is the lowest on the list (of course this doesn't apply to some income brackets just saying).

    Usually its being acknowledge that somebody noticed your work and just an occassional compliment.

    Don't do what happened at one of my old jobs when the company sent all the managers to some training seminar and the day they came back they made it freaking obvious they were taught this and the compliments felt so fake.
    Career advancement is the first thing that comes to mind. If someone else is getting credit for your hard work chances are they are going to get your raise and promotion also.

    +1

    Also the less known people are easier to lay off, less attachment.
  • erpadminerpadmin Posts: 4,165Member
    tpatt100 wrote: »
    Don't do what happened at one of my old jobs when the company sent all the managers to some training seminar and the day they came back they made it freaking obvious they were taught this and the compliments felt so fake.

    Are you kidding...lol.

    I went to a "training seminar" on communication with my entire department (mandatory for my whole department...money left in prior year's budget had to be spent, boss got to say employees were sent to training, blah blah blah.) Anyway, we all took away some validation nonsense and, as a joke, made sure we "validated" each other whenever we spoke to each other....that lasted for a few days, then it was back to normal. But we intentionally made it fake and in good fun, because we all saw it was a bunch of nonsense.
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