CISCO Certifications Not Needing A Live Lab?

SponxSponx Member Posts: 161
Just curious if there are base level/entry level CISCO certifications where I wouldn't need a live lab/in depth simulations?

I am looking to just get my foot in the door with one of their certifications. I understand the hierarchy of the certifications, just not the complicatedness of them.

Thank you for any feedback.
Personal Website | LinkedIn Account | Spiceworks Account | Field Services Engineer

Certifications (Held): A+, CWP, Dell Certified
Certifications (Studying):
Network+, Security+
Certifications (In Planning): Server+,
ICND1 (CCENT), ICND2 (CCNA)

Comments

  • swildswild Member Posts: 828
    there are 2 entry level certs: CCT and CCENT.

    CCT is pretty new and I haven't really heard anything about it. CCENT is a little more in depth than the Network+ cert.

    Theres a link to a chart comparing the two here:

    Technician (CCT) - Technician (CCT) - Cisco Systems

    There are also plenty of people who are able to pass the CCNA exam without touching the equipment, but I am not one of them.

    From the looks of it, CCT you should be able to do without having any equipment. Since it is so new, there may not be any marketable value in having the crt since no one would know what it is. You should expect to have to explain it during every interview.
  • SponxSponx Member Posts: 161
    Would you do a CCENT vs. a Network+? What is more respected? Because I am taking my 70-680 exam for MCITP:EA starters, and doing my Security+ kind-of at the same time. Would you suggest otherwise?

    Thanks for the feedback.
    Personal Website | LinkedIn Account | Spiceworks Account | Field Services Engineer

    Certifications (Held): A+, CWP, Dell Certified
    Certifications (Studying):
    Network+, Security+
    Certifications (In Planning): Server+,
    ICND1 (CCENT), ICND2 (CCNA)
  • MAC_AddyMAC_Addy Member Posts: 1,740 ■■■■□□□□□□
    You could probably get by CCENT with out needing any equipment. Though, it'll be good for you to have Packet Tracer to test a lot of the commands and help with the memorization of the commands. I found that when I first started (without any equipment or simulators) that I couldn't really remember the commands too well. After I bought some equipment it was like 2nd nature to me.
    2017 Certification Goals:
    CCNP R/S
  • Asif DaslAsif Dasl Member Posts: 2,116 ■■■■■■■■□□
    You have to renew a Network+, so you might as well go with CCENT as that needs to be renewed as well and gets you half way to CCNA. They are different, so if you can get a second hand Network+ book, read that, don't take the exam and then go for CCENT. That would be the way I would go about it.
  • swildswild Member Posts: 828
    Having my Network+ really made learning CCENT and CCNA much faster. If you have no networking experience, I would suggest the Network+ first and there are some really good books out there for self study. Also, I don't know how hard it will be to find training on the CCT. There is a lot of overlap between the Network+ and the CCENT. If you know the Network+ stuff, it makes much less you have to learn for the CCENT.
  • NetworkVeteranNetworkVeteran Member Posts: 2,338 ■■■■■■■■□□
    Sponx wrote: »
    Just curious if there are base level/entry level CISCO certifications where I wouldn't need a live lab/in depth simulations?
    CCENT => CCNA, or jumping straight to CCNA, is the normal path. For an entry-level position where you're primarily configuring and troubleshooting networking equipment, I'd rank them: Network+ (unhireable) < CCENT (unhireable) < CCNA (hireable). I just did a quick search, and in my area a CCENT qualifies you for 19 jobs and a CCNA for 888 jobs. :p

    If you're aiming to administer Windows PCs and servers and leave complex networking stuff to others--I see you have an A+ and are working on Microsoft letters--then the Network+ may be more closely aligned with your career goals.
  • SponxSponx Member Posts: 161
    Problem is:

    - I work full time
    - I am trying to get back into school
    - I am studying for Security+ and MCITP:EA right now as the company I work with needs more Microsoft Server 2008 Admins
    - I need something to get my foot in the door with our Network/Security team.
    Personal Website | LinkedIn Account | Spiceworks Account | Field Services Engineer

    Certifications (Held): A+, CWP, Dell Certified
    Certifications (Studying):
    Network+, Security+
    Certifications (In Planning): Server+,
    ICND1 (CCENT), ICND2 (CCNA)
  • NetworkVeteranNetworkVeteran Member Posts: 2,338 ■■■■■■■■□□
    Sponx wrote: »
    Problem is:

    Sponx, sims don't have to be scary. If you're short on time, Boson Netsim can be bought and installed in under ten minutes. It includes a variety of guided labs (the "something to do" is as important as the sim!) Doing simulated labs makes the key concepts easier to remember, and besides, and if you really want to impress someone, a bit of hands-on goes a long way! "I've actually used Cisco IOS" can often be as important as "I have this piece of paper!"
  • MAC_AddyMAC_Addy Member Posts: 1,740 ■■■■□□□□□□
    I also work full time, that's why I started with ICND1 (passed) now on ICND2... I think if I were to go for the CCNA exam it'll take me a long time to study and pass the exam. The ICND1+2 breaks up the subjects into easier chunks.
    2017 Certification Goals:
    CCNP R/S
  • SponxSponx Member Posts: 161
    ICND1/2 - Are they complicated/needing simulations, and if you pass the ICND1/2 what does that exactly achieve? Or are those separate exams in entirety?
    Personal Website | LinkedIn Account | Spiceworks Account | Field Services Engineer

    Certifications (Held): A+, CWP, Dell Certified
    Certifications (Studying):
    Network+, Security+
    Certifications (In Planning): Server+,
    ICND1 (CCENT), ICND2 (CCNA)
  • SponxSponx Member Posts: 161
    Sponx, sims don't have to be scary. If you're short on time, Boson Netsim can be bought and installed in under ten minutes. It includes a variety of guided labs (the "something to do" is as important as the sim!) Doing simulated labs makes the key concepts easier to remember, and besides, and if you really want to impress someone, a bit of hands-on goes a long way! "I've actually used Cisco IOS" can often be as important as "I have this piece of paper!"

    I'll look into that, thank you.
    Personal Website | LinkedIn Account | Spiceworks Account | Field Services Engineer

    Certifications (Held): A+, CWP, Dell Certified
    Certifications (Studying):
    Network+, Security+
    Certifications (In Planning): Server+,
    ICND1 (CCENT), ICND2 (CCNA)
  • Asif DaslAsif Dasl Member Posts: 2,116 ■■■■■■■■□□
    Sponx is there any way your employer will give you an hour a day or something to study? Often it's very expensive to hire people from outside than people within the company, and the relative cost to give you a few hours to fill a company need could make it a win-win situation - you might just need to ask.
  • SponxSponx Member Posts: 161
    I am able to study off and on at my current job; however, simulations are something I am not able to do while at work.
    Personal Website | LinkedIn Account | Spiceworks Account | Field Services Engineer

    Certifications (Held): A+, CWP, Dell Certified
    Certifications (Studying):
    Network+, Security+
    Certifications (In Planning): Server+,
    ICND1 (CCENT), ICND2 (CCNA)
  • MAC_AddyMAC_Addy Member Posts: 1,740 ■■■■□□□□□□
    Sponx wrote: »
    ICND1/2 - Are they complicated/needing simulations, and if you pass the ICND1/2 what does that exactly achieve? Or are those separate exams in entirety?
    If you get books on the exams then they're not complicated at all.

    If you pass the ICND2 first, then you'll technically have nothing. Just the ICND2 out of the way.

    If you pass the ICND1 exam, you'll have CCENT, pass your ICND2 then you'll have CCNA.
    2017 Certification Goals:
    CCNP R/S
  • SponxSponx Member Posts: 161
    So taking ICND1 and ICND2 would be the best bet. I may PM you some questions if you don't mind. :)
    Personal Website | LinkedIn Account | Spiceworks Account | Field Services Engineer

    Certifications (Held): A+, CWP, Dell Certified
    Certifications (Studying):
    Network+, Security+
    Certifications (In Planning): Server+,
    ICND1 (CCENT), ICND2 (CCNA)
  • JeanMJeanM Member Posts: 1,117
    Get simulators, but seriously though you can easily get 2 cisco routers and a switch on ebay for about 100.... 2 2600 series for about $75 shipped and then 2950 for about 30-40. You can then lab a lot of CCENT / ICND1 material with that.

    I took n+/s+ years ago (boss wanted me to take them and pay for them as well) when I was going for my mcse as it also covered the MS electives parts, and at that time I didn't have to re-cert them. I am now studying for CCNA by attending a local college twice a week after week 4 hours a day, and some of the stuff I've learned in N+ is also on ICND1, but CCNA is much more involved than N+.

    You have to re-cert CCNA too anyway you look at that...
    2015 goals - ccna voice / vmware vcp.
  • SponxSponx Member Posts: 161
    Getting them is not the issue.. Space/Time to play on them is my concern/problem.
    Personal Website | LinkedIn Account | Spiceworks Account | Field Services Engineer

    Certifications (Held): A+, CWP, Dell Certified
    Certifications (Studying):
    Network+, Security+
    Certifications (In Planning): Server+,
    ICND1 (CCENT), ICND2 (CCNA)
  • NetworkVeteranNetworkVeteran Member Posts: 2,338 ■■■■■■■■□□
    JeanM wrote: »
    Get simulators, but seriously though you can easily get 2 cisco routers and a switch on ebay for about 100.... 2 2600 series for about $75 shipped and then 2950 for about 30-40. You can then lab a lot of CCENT / ICND1 material with that.
    I'd advise against real equipment if time is a concern. Simulators are much more time efficient. I'd never have been able to nail the CCNA in three days or the CCNP in a month if I had real equipment to slow me down.

    Real used, obsolete equipment may have bent connectors, too little memory, the wrong type of cable, the wrong IOS, etc. Replacing bad parts can set you back days. These may be interesting, even educational if you're new to networking--but they won't help you master the topics Cisco feels are important or earn your certifications as fast as possible.
  • JeanMJeanM Member Posts: 1,117
    How is cramming CCNA material in 3 days learning though? icon_confused.gif: I guess if you are in a RUSH, and just want to get the cert thats one thing, but to learn it , it will take more than 3 days. Unless of course you have the hands on experience already/have been doing the job, and just need to cert..then I can see it being a good way to go.

    Someone totally new to CISCO who'll cram the CCNA in 3 days to get the foot in the door may not be able to "show" what they actually know, and that would be pretty embarassing imho.

    I mean, yeah you may need to flash the ios or do some configs, or buy cables... but out of 10 devices I bought on ebay not ONE was bad?

    good luck with whatever you choose to do :)
    2015 goals - ccna voice / vmware vcp.
  • NetworkVeteranNetworkVeteran Member Posts: 2,338 ■■■■■■■■□□
    JeanM wrote: »
    How is cramming CCNA material in 3 days learning though? icon_confused.gif: I guess if you are in a RUSH, and just want to get the cert thats one thing, but to learn it , it will take more than 3 days.
    Jean, you earn a Cisco certification when you know the material well-enough to pass it. For me that took three days for one and a month for the other. I have successfully defended my knowledge in many interviews, even against CCIEs, and applied it effectively on the job. Not everyone has the same background or aptitude. If you need a year, take a year, but don't use words like "rush" or "cram" that imply it's somehow better to take longer to achieve the same mastery of the material.

    The OP mentions being time-constrained, and yes.. evaluating obsolete, low-end, used Cisco gear.. waiting for it to arrive.. racking and cabling it up.. troubleshooting missing or faulty hardware.. this all takes time. Time that could be better spent mastering the exam topics and getting familiar with Cisco IOS if he were using a simulator such as NetSim, Packet Tracer, GNS3, IOU, etc.--or even doing something that he enjoys on his own or with family!
  • JeanMJeanM Member Posts: 1,117
    I am just saying that 3 DAYS to cover ICND1 and ICND2 if you go by Odom's books that's almost 2000 pages alone is basically "cramming" no matter how you look at it ;) You are absolutely correct that it may not work for all, OP if you go this route please keep us posted with your results :)
    2015 goals - ccna voice / vmware vcp.
  • NetworkVeteranNetworkVeteran Member Posts: 2,338 ■■■■■■■■□□
    JeanM wrote: »
    I am just saying that 3 DAYS to cover ICND1 and ICND2 if you go by Odom's books that's almost 2000 pages
    I don't read Odom anymore--too wordy for me. Todd Lammle covers the ICND1 + ICND2 material in 800 pages. I also don't read multiple sources. I strive for efficiency in studying, as I do in network designs.

    The point wasn't to attempt to pass in 3 days, although I hope it's so easy for him! :)

    Just that sims seem the most time-efficient way to pass the CCNA.
  • RoguetadhgRoguetadhg CompTIA A+, Network+. Member Posts: 2,489 ■■■■■■■■□□
    yeah, it is. But it lacks the feeling of actually doing it.
    In order to succeed, your desire for success should be greater than your fear of failure.
    TE Threads: How to study for the CCENT/CCNA, Introduction to Cisco Exams

  • JasonXJasonX Member Posts: 96 ■■■□□□□□□□
    OP,

    While I did attend a 5 day CCNA Bootcamp class where I did work with live Cisco Equipment, I could probably say that I could have passed the CCNA Composite with just the use of SIMs such as Packet Tracer.

    I utilized Sybex books from an author who escapes me but has posted on here, and took down well over 200 maybe 300 worth of notes from the book as well as used the Flash Cards that were part of the Book/CD bundle.

    I am probably taking my CCNA-Security exam next week after just a little over a month using only the CiscoPress Authorized Study Guide and several forum resources.

    Closing: My personal belief is you can get through CCNA & CCNA:Security without purchasing equipment. From what I have read, you can even pass the CCNP:Route exam without equipment as well, this incidentally will be my next step.
    2016 Certification Goals:
    CCIE R/S Written: ???
    CCIE R/S Lab: ???
    Add me on LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/pub/jason-meier/38/912/280/
  • Forsaken_GAForsaken_GA Member Posts: 4,024
    The simulator vs. real equipment debate is another one of those holy wars. You can effectively do the CCNA on simulators.

    However, needing time on the OS is not up for debate. The majority of Cisco certs do have some sims involved with them, or at least simlets. The bottom line is that you are required to know how to configure some stuff, and the exams do cute things like give you some output and then ask you to translate it. I'm not saying it's impossible, but it'd be very difficult.

    Now, if all you need is a network cert to get your foot in the door with a team, and you don't intend to make a career out of network engineering, go for the Net+ (assuming that's acceptable for the team you're trying to join). The Net+ is pretty much entirely theory based, and can be passed with just book knowledge alone. If you intend to go down the Cisco network engineer path, then invest some time and money into some sort of method to be able to play with Cisco gear and do CCENT instead.
  • MAC_AddyMAC_Addy Member Posts: 1,740 ■■■■□□□□□□

    Now, if all you need is a network cert to get your foot in the door with a team, and you don't intend to make a career out of network engineering, go for the Net+ (assuming that's acceptable for the team you're trying to join). The Net+ is pretty much entirely theory based, and can be passed with just book knowledge alone. If you intend to go down the Cisco network engineer path, then invest some time and money into some sort of method to be able to play with Cisco gear and do CCENT instead.
    You hit the nail on the head with this one. You're are 100% correct. I passed the Net+ with just reading one book with limited network knowledge. I don't know how much the exam has changed since I took it in 2006. But definitely learning network+ and THEN going into Cisco would help a lot. Since Network+ will held with a little foundation of networking.
    2017 Certification Goals:
    CCNP R/S
Sign In or Register to comment.