Certs for pre-sales engineers?

scorpio2971scorpio2971 Registered Users Posts: 3 ■□□□□□□□□□
I was wondering if anybody had some advice on certs for pre-sales engineers with SaaS backgrounds working in content management. I'm in a job hunt and a few recruiters have mentioned it might be good to get some sort of MCSA type certification dealing with Windows Server 2008, or any type of certs related to cloud/virtualization etc.... anybody have any thoughts on this?

Comments

  • paul78paul78 Member Posts: 3,016 ■■■■■■■■■■
    I have no idea.

    But when I work with vendors and the sales person shows up with a sales engineer, the sales engineer usually has a cert in whatever the sales person was selling - whether it was Cisco, Microsoft, HP, etc.

    When I meet with vendors of security products or services, the pre-sales engineer had a CISSP.
  • Agent6376Agent6376 Member Posts: 201
    In my experience I find that effective pre-sales engineers need to understand whatever product they are assisting sales guys with pretty well. On one hand you could say that you don't necessarily require "in the trenches" type experience, but you're expected to have a detailed understanding of at minimum the theoretical concepts of the product you're pushing, and chances are you would perform a variety of lab scenarios to demonstrate the product as well.

    TLDR: Follow the same certification tracks as those who would implement the products in the field. The point of a sales ENGINEER is that you're just that - an engineer.
  • ChooseLifeChooseLife Member Posts: 941 ■■■■■■■□□□
    Agent6376 wrote: »
    Follow the same certification tracks as those who would implement the products in the field. The point of a sales ENGINEER is that you're just that - an engineer.
    What he said
    “You don’t become great by trying to be great. You become great by wanting to do something, and then doing it so hard that you become great in the process.” (c) xkcd #896

    GetCertified4Less
    - discounted vouchers for certs
  • scorpio2971scorpio2971 Registered Users Posts: 3 ■□□□□□□□□□
    Thanks for the responses. Today I spoke with a recruiter who mentioned ITIL just to "beef" up the resume, saying that it would indicate greater aptitude, and that many mangers simply look for 2 things - attitude, and aptitude because the technology for different companies can be taught. I'll have to think about this further - so far I do hear a lot of people mentioning MCSA to me as well. I feel like it makes no sense to pursue a certification until you're in the company and showing you want to progress in a certain direction, then go get that particular cert. IN this case, I'm a bit surprised that some are saying getting some sort of general cert (A+, Network+) or exposure to Windows Server 2008 someway somehow. My classmate at DePaul University swears that just by taking Microsoft Virtual Academy courses for free online, it gave him a leg up in interviews and calls.
  • UnixGuyUnixGuy Are we having fun yet? Mod Posts: 4,103 Mod
    Usually try to get vendor-based training. Whatever product you are designing/selling, try to take some online course or hands-on training for that. An MBA is a great plus for pre-sales because of the business exposure you get..
    Goal: MBA, Jan 2021
  • ptilsenptilsen Member Posts: 2,835 ■■■■■■■■■■
    The new MS "cloud" certs would probably be right up your alley. Otherwise, yes, I think ITIL would make sense.

    That said, yes, I agree with Agent6376. Ultimately if you are going to make informed recommendations as a Sales engineer you need to be about as well versed in the product as those who will implement it -- in some case, you need to be an SME in the product whilst those implementing it probably do not.

    A great example would be HP servers. You don't have to know much about HP's current line of hardware to implement an HP server. To recommend the correct set of product numbers for an HP server solution, you pretty much have to be an expect in determining optimal compatibility. Sure, I can spec out a server and all the parts for a design, but why do that when I can just give the specs and features I want to an expert sales engineer and have them spec it out? (Actually, sometimes they get it wrong or don't recommend the cheapest available, but not often)
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  • N2ITN2IT Inactive Imported Users Posts: 7,483
    Scorpio I have always been interested in IT sales. Being 100% extroverted has always pushed me to go into a field to leverage my natural outgoing personality.

    If you find anything out please post.
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