SSCP and Linux

KeenerKeener Member Posts: 146 ■■■■□□□□□□
I am new to the Security side of things. I am taking my Security+ exam soon. I will then be starting on the SSCP shortly there after (employer backing is a great thing!). Do I need a foundation in Linux at all for the SSCP?

This came up through an employer sponsored Wireless Hacking Contest (new wireless config being put in place next week). I had issues just trying install drivers for an AR9271 wireless card because I don't have a foundation/knowledge base on Linux.

I want to learn Linux, I just didn't know if I should learn it before or after the SSCP.

Thanks in advance for your guidance! icon_thumright.gif
Pain is only temporary. No matter how bad it gets, it always ends!

Comments

  • JDMurrayJDMurray MSIT InfoSec CISSP SSCP GSOM GSEC EnCE C|EH Cloud+ CySA+ CASP+ Linux+ PenTest+ Security+ Surf City, USAAdmin Posts: 12,715 Admin
    The (ISC)2 certification exams do not contain vendor-specific material, but you are expected to understand operating system architecture concepts and security and practices. You won't need to know specifics about Linux or Windows or OS X, but you should use them to learn about OSes, file systems, and networking.

    And video and networking drivers can be some of the most difficult things to install, tweak, and debug under Linux.
  • dmoore44dmoore44 Member Posts: 646
    JDMurray wrote: »
    And video and networking drivers can be some of the most difficult things to install, tweak, and debug under Linux.

    Such a truism. I remember about 10 years ago, driver support from AMD and nVidia was pretty abysmal (nVidia was slightly better, but it was marginal at best). Granted, kernel support for video output was baked in, but there was little in the way of hardware acceleration with the default kernel modules (i.e. it didn't exist). So that made gaming on a Linux box somewhat of a chore.

    And even recently, Linux support for some WiFi chipsets is pretty bad. The ath9k modules weren't baked in to the kernel until not too long ago. I was pretty excited to find out that I could finally use my old eeePC as a lightweight BackTrack machine when BT 5r2 was released!
    Graduated Carnegie Mellon University MSIT: Information Security & Assurance Currently Reading Books on TensorFlow
  • KeenerKeener Member Posts: 146 ■■■■□□□□□□
    Thanks for the info. It is greatly appreciated. I have heard that drivers for Linux can be a pain, but it is even worse when you don't know what you are doing! Enter Me!!! LOL I will learn in the future as I want to use it as a tool (and all the Security/Ethical Hacking tools that use it). I just know my limitations for now.

    I just wish I knew now what I will know in the future! LOL
    Pain is only temporary. No matter how bad it gets, it always ends!
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