NIC layer 1 or 2

slimpickens88slimpickens88 Registered Users Posts: 3 ■□□□□□□□□□
Ive had practice exams only allow one answer. Will the n + do this? If so which one?

Comments

  • luberguilarteluberguilarte Member Posts: 112
    Nic's are layer one ( phisical layer or L1, as u want to call it) make sure you learn the OSI models , very important for networking, is the foundation where networks sits.
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  • drkatdrkat Banned Posts: 703
    I think we should've given a more "What do you think answer" - a lot of times the layers are confusing ...

    An easy way to remember if the device is operating at the physical layer would be to consider its operation. Does it just send electrical signals, or does it actually do something with the frames it's receiving.

    Most folks confuse a hub and a switch as if they both operate at the same layer, but they dont. Hubs are physical layer only because it just repeats electrical signals out of all of its ports, it does not allow us to configure port settings or do anything else; a switch is layer 2 because we CAN do things other than repeat.

    I hope this helps.
  • IvanjamIvanjam Member Posts: 978 ■■■■□□□□□□
    A NIC sends frames from one layer 2 (hardware or MAC) address to another and is thus a layer 2 device.
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  • halaakajanhalaakajan Member Posts: 167
    very good explanation by drkat. you rock!
  • drkatdrkat Banned Posts: 703
    Ivanjam wrote: »
    A NIC sends frames from one layer 2 (hardware or MAC) address to another and is thus a layer 2 device.

    You sure about that? I suppose we could argue... but the test would have you consider a NIC a physical device

    If we argue the fact that the NIC sends frames, it actually doesnt encapsulate any frames... it just pulses electrical signals, so it's a layer 1 device. The driver(s) package the frames and the NIC puts them on the wires.
  • slimpickens88slimpickens88 Registered Users Posts: 3 ■□□□□□□□□□
    The diffrent layers havent been too confusing to me. This however was throwing me off. I appreciate your input. Thanks
  • cyberguyprcyberguypr Mod Posts: 6,927 Mod
    More insight on this topic: http://www.techexams.net/forums/ccna-ccent/54110-what-layer-pc-nic.html

    Discussions like this make me love the TCP/IP model instead of OSI.
  • luberguilarteluberguilarte Member Posts: 112
    Hey Ivanjam , did you give that as an answer on your network+ cert ? hahahaha , try that with the ccent and you will see what's going to be the result on your test , at least if you don't know research , read and study that way you don't confuse the guy asking the question. Nothing personal , you are wrong.
  • MorinphenMorinphen Member Posts: 5 ■□□□□□□□□□
    Quote from Mike Meyers Network+ All-In-One:

    "You might be tempted to categorize the NIC as part of the Physical Layer at this point, and you'd have a valid arguement. The NIC clearly is necessary for the physical connection to take place. The CompTIA Network+ exam and many authors put the NIC in OSI Layer 2, the Data Link Layer, though, so clearly something else is happening inside the NIC."

    Layer 2 is my answer.
  • luberguilarteluberguilarte Member Posts: 112
    Morinphen which company people trust the most for networks , comptia or the great cisco ? My answer still that Nic's belong to L1 , I thing it just an interface that sits between both layer , it's 50% phisical and 50 % data link , but theoretically they want you to know that is a L1 devices , I know is confuse it but that's what the big network guy's want you to know it as.
  • MorinphenMorinphen Member Posts: 5 ■□□□□□□□□□
    I would trust whichever answer is correct for the Network+ exam.
  • georgemcgeorgemc Member Posts: 429
    Morinphen which company people trust the most for networks , comptia or the great cisco ? My answer still that Nic's belong to L1 , I thing it just an interface that sits between both layer , it's 50% phisical and 50 % data link , but theoretically they want you to know that is a L1 devices , I know is confuse it but that's what the big network guy's want you to know it as.

    Which OSI layer are MAC addresses at?

    Which physical component within your PC contains the MAC address?

    Also check out "DATA LINK" in the link below. It's the last sentence of the paragraph I believe:)

    CCNA TechNotes: OSI model

    With that said, provide the answer that the creator of the exam expects. Meaning the answer provided in the texts for the particular vendor exam that you're studying for.
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    TRANSFERRED/COMPLETED: AGC1,BBC1,LAE1,QBT1,LUT1,QLC1,QMC1,QLT1,IWC1,INC1,INT1,BVC1,CLC1,MGC1, CWV1 BNC1, LIT1,LWC1,QAT1,WFV1,EST1,EGC1,EGT1,IWT1,MKC1,MKT1,RWT1,FNT1,FNC1, BDC1,TPV1 REQUIRED:
  • luberguilarteluberguilarte Member Posts: 112
    Ok, I really understand your point, but try this example , disconnect your NIC from your PC and tell me if you will still be able to transmit bits , remember that the layer about rely on the lower one , cables for sure operated at L1 but where the electrical signal come from ? I hope you know is the NIC right!!!!!! cables just make the comunication possible from one device to another, again this's what cisco want you to know , from my logical point it operated at both layers , because the physical address is burn directly on the NIC and for me is an interface between both layers.
  • drkatdrkat Banned Posts: 703
    @georgemc - if you scroll to the physical layer header last sentence as well..

    it's a valid argument and as you said, it would be "right" for whichever the exam is asking for. Beyond the exam, the information will never be used
  • Carl_S_901Carl_S_901 Member Posts: 105
    I personally agree that NICs are both layer 1 and layer 2 devices.

    However, in Cisco Academy this issue came up in one class and I was basically told that in the Cisco world you can always think of a NIC as a layer 2 device so I have stuck with that for exam purposes.

    Technically, a NIC also has sub-layers (LLC and MAC) at Layer 2 as well, but that is another discussion.

    I took the Network+ exam a few months back (N10-004) and used that same stance for any question I ran across in that regard. I do not recall there being any specific question about this though, but if there was I would have chosen Layer 2 (Data-Link layer in OSI and Network Access layer in TCP/IP 4-layer model)

    I passed the exam btw. ;)

    Thanks


    Carl S.


    Check out my personal certification journey blog
    Carl's Certification Journey | The road to getting certified can often be bumpy
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  • FiR3xFiR3x Member Posts: 24 ■□□□□□□□□□
    NICs are layer 1. However, the softwares that runs on NICs are layer 2 "Data Link" layer.
  • magisterludimagisterludi Registered Users Posts: 5 ■□□□□□□□□□
    The practise exam on this site gives layer one as incorrect.

    My net + text indicates layer one as correct.

    The exam on this site needs alteration and correction as it is misleading.
  • IvanjamIvanjam Member Posts: 978 ■■■■□□□□□□
    Hey Ivanjam , did you give that as an answer on your network+ cert ? hahahaha , try that with the ccent and you will see what's going to be the result on your test , at least if you don't know research , read and study that way you don't confuse the guy asking the question. Nothing personal , you are wrong.

    That response was quite condescending and did not shed any light on the question asked.
    Fall 2014: Start MA in Mathematics [X]
    Fall 2016: Start PhD in Mathematics [X]
  • MGAanalystMGAanalyst Registered Users Posts: 1 ■□□□□□□□□□
    Exam Cram written by Pearson Vue who administers the tests and Comp TIA authorized goes with Layer 2 Data Layer. Their explanation is, "Although it provides the physical connection to the network, a NIC is considered a data link device." Based on this I'm going with Layer 2 as it appears this is what the exam wants.
  • BlueRozeBlueRoze Member Posts: 27 ■■■□□□□□□□
    I have told my students to read the question, if it's troubleshooting and the question is about the NIC not physically working, then layer 1. If it's about how the NIC operates digitally, then layer 2. I also tell them I can't guarantee that will give them a right answer either way. We have copies of the Authorized Cert Guide and I've always assumed that book is a good reference for what will bei right/wrong on the test, even if something in the book seems wrong. Personally I haven't found anything flat out wrong, but I have seen a few reviews that claimed there was incorrect information. I also haven't read it cover to cover.
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