Why do so many people consider Sec+ as unneccessary?

gadav478gadav478 Member Posts: 374 ■■■□□□□□□□
Hey fellow TE heads-

I just was wondering why the Sec+ gets so many flack. I hear that the Sec+ isn't neccessary and that if you want to improve your job outlook, then grabbing something else is a better choice. Can those who have the Security+ explain how their career outlook has changed (hopefully positively) and those who are in the speciality comment as to why they think it is either worthwhile or not?

Thanks!
Goals for 2015: CCNP

Comments

  • IristheangelIristheangel CCIEx2 (Sec + DC), CCNP RS, CCNA V/S/R/DC, CISSP, CEH, MCSE 2003, A+/L+/N+/S+, and a lot more from m Pasadena, CAMod Posts: 4,133 Mod
    I wouldn't say Security+ isn't necessary. In fact, it's probably the only CompTIA certification that I don't regret getting. It has it's usefulness depending on where you end up doing next (i.e. cuts a year off the CISSP experience requirements, helps you get in with the DoD, counts as an elective for the MCSE 2003:Security, etc). It really depends on what you want to do and what your current role is. If you're not really into infosec, don't plan on getting any advanced infosec certs and are low on funds, you can pass by it.
    BS, MS, and CCIE #50931
    Blog: www.network-node.com
  • NotHackingYouNotHackingYou Member Posts: 1,460 ■■■■■■■■□□
    I agree with the above and wanted to add that I wouldn't say its unnecessary either, but you have to recognize what it is. It is a validation of your understanding of the concepts to covers. I really learned a TON when studying for the S+ and validation of that is the best value a certificate offers.

    It has not had any direct, immediate effect on my career. I am employed in an IT department where security is a top priority, too. Granted, I'm not out job shopping but I don't see a lot of hits for it on dice for my region.
    When you go the extra mile, there's no traffic.
  • ZartanasaurusZartanasaurus Member Posts: 2,008 ■■■■■■■■■□
    Sec+ is an okay test. It's better than A+/Network+ IMO. You'll become familiar with the terminology in Security and it seems like a better door opener than other CompTIA tests. It's hands down the easiest test I've ever taken. I sort of consider it a joke of a test for that very reason.
    Currently reading:
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  • gdeusthewhizkidgdeusthewhizkid Member Posts: 289
    I keep hearing that and I want to pull the plug on it and take the test but at 275.00 I dont want to chance it and studying for it is pretty boring.
    WGU Progress: Progress | Completed | Start Date: 9/1/2012 B.S. Network Management & Design
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  • sratakhinsratakhin Member Posts: 818
    Just wait until you can get a discounted voucher for it. I bought one off Ebay for like $200. I also saw some $100+ vouchers on getcertified4less a couple of days ago.
  • PlantwizPlantwiz Alligator wrestler Mod Posts: 5,057 Mod
    @gadav478

    Why do you think having a Sec+ is a problem or unnecessary? Please explain the reason you are asking.

    As far as the Sec+ being useful to everyone, no, like most certificates, only some apply to the majority of people, and many certifications only apply to those folks using that specific technology.

    I don't recall anyone saying that the Sec+ is a waste of time, but most who seek the certificate are working their way upward and start with vendor neutral cert.

    The next question after you answer my first, "what do YOU want to do within the IT industry?"

    Answer my two questions and you can more easily assess if Sec+ is something you need to include on your study path.
    Plantwiz
    _____
    "Grammar and spelling aren't everything, but this is a forum, not a chat room. You have plenty of time to spell out the word "you", and look just a little bit smarter." by Phaideaux

    ***I'll add you can Capitalize the word 'I' to show a little respect for yourself too.

    'i' before 'e' except after 'c'.... weird?
  • juvenileslilbrothajuvenileslilbrotha Member Posts: 17 ■□□□□□□□□□
    A lotta people say the CCNA is unnecessary as well however, I just got credit for four full classes towards my degree in Information Technology that begs to differ. You gotta know what you want to do LONG TERM. The Sec+ is heavily recognized by any organization that is affiliated with the Dept, of Home land Security. You want to get that good paying Job overseas...guess what? You better have your Sec+ cert first. Now let's put that rumor to rest.
  • gadav478gadav478 Member Posts: 374 ■■■□□□□□□□
    @ Plantwiz - Please see my PM.

    All-

    Good to hear your perspectives. It seems as though people aren't putting it to good use.
    Goals for 2015: CCNP
  • tpatt100tpatt100 Member Posts: 2,991 ■■■■■■■■■□
    I got mine because I had to, it was really a beginner cert though. I can see the usefulness to somebody with a few years experience. I don't insult CompTIA I think they provide a service to help reduce the size of the gap between entry level and higher level. They just seem too broad to be in the middle though.
  • teancum144teancum144 Member Posts: 229 ■■■□□□□□□□
    I wouldn't say Security+ isn't necessary. In fact, it's probably the only CompTIA certification that I don't regret getting.
    Interesting, I recently passed the Network+ exam and am currently studying for Security+. Between the two (so far), I find the knowledge gained from studying Network+ to be far more comprehensive and technical than Security+ (which seem relatively easy compared to Network+). I guess I cannot say for sure until I pass the Security+ exam. :)
    If you like my comments or questions, you can show appreciation by clicking on the reputation badge/star icon near the lower left of my post. :D
  • teancum144teancum144 Member Posts: 229 ■■■□□□□□□□
    Sec+ is an okay test. It's better than A+/Network+ IMO.
    I found the knowledge I gained from studying Network+ invaluable and foundational.
    If you like my comments or questions, you can show appreciation by clicking on the reputation badge/star icon near the lower left of my post. :D
  • IristheangelIristheangel CCIEx2 (Sec + DC), CCNP RS, CCNA V/S/R/DC, CISSP, CEH, MCSE 2003, A+/L+/N+/S+, and a lot more from m Pasadena, CAMod Posts: 4,133 Mod
    @teancum144, It depends what you want to do with your IT career. I enjoy networking and security, but I felt that I would have gotten more ROI on going directly for the CCENT instead of the N+. I felt that about 80-90% of what was on the N+ material was on the CCENT so I would have preferred to save $250. 20/20 hindsight I suppose. The knowledge from the Security+ wasn't the big payout for me, it was the fact that one year was waived from my work experience requirements from my CISSP and that I had a free elective out of the way for my MCSE:Security. It saved me time and money that way. This is just the way I see it and how I value my certifications. To each their own :)
    BS, MS, and CCIE #50931
    Blog: www.network-node.com
  • rsuttonrsutton Member Posts: 1,029 ■■■■■□□□□□
    teancum144 wrote: »
    I found the knowledge I gained from studying Network+ invaluable and foundational.

    The value of any cert is relative to what you do, some certs being more valuable to a wider audience. Plantwiz pretty much summed it up.
  • DarthVaderDarthVader Member Posts: 71 ■■□□□□□□□□
    It's not that it is a bad cert or anything. It's just entry level, nothing wrong with that.

    Most CompTIA certs are considered entry level. If you want to get a more comprehensive Network cert you should probably travel down the Cisco path. If you want to concentrate in Security you should eveentually get into the GIAC or ISC2 arena.
  • PlantwizPlantwiz Alligator wrestler Mod Posts: 5,057 Mod
    gadav478 wrote: »
    @ Plantwiz - Please see my PM.

    All-

    Good to hear your perspectives. It seems as though people aren't putting it to good use.

    My question wasn't requesting a PM'd response. My question is public because others may also think what you are thinking and can benefit from going through the thought process.

    You may answer in the forum.
    Plantwiz
    _____
    "Grammar and spelling aren't everything, but this is a forum, not a chat room. You have plenty of time to spell out the word "you", and look just a little bit smarter." by Phaideaux

    ***I'll add you can Capitalize the word 'I' to show a little respect for yourself too.

    'i' before 'e' except after 'c'.... weird?
  • RoguetadhgRoguetadhg CompTIA A+, Network+. Member Posts: 2,489 ■■■■■■■■□□
    How can studying security procedures be considered an un-needed thing?

    Im sure we all can use a little more preaching about passwords and what happens with security. It's Entry level, but Im hoping Entry still means it'll cover the important keys about security that we can pass along to others. Password strength, weaknesses, basic things - entry-level things.
    In order to succeed, your desire for success should be greater than your fear of failure.
    TE Threads: How to study for the CCENT/CCNA, Introduction to Cisco Exams

  • IristheangelIristheangel CCIEx2 (Sec + DC), CCNP RS, CCNA V/S/R/DC, CISSP, CEH, MCSE 2003, A+/L+/N+/S+, and a lot more from m Pasadena, CAMod Posts: 4,133 Mod
    I dont think understanding or studying security procedures is a bad thing but it might be unnecessary for some to take the extra step of spending the money to get certified depending on what they do for a living.
    BS, MS, and CCIE #50931
    Blog: www.network-node.com
  • RoguetadhgRoguetadhg CompTIA A+, Network+. Member Posts: 2,489 ■■■■■■■■□□
    I'm studying for it - I haven't yet spent the money to schedule yet. I'll decide half way through if it's worth it or not. Since it's not a lifetime cert, I don't know. It'll be nice to have it so I can have a chance to land a job with other places.
    In order to succeed, your desire for success should be greater than your fear of failure.
    TE Threads: How to study for the CCENT/CCNA, Introduction to Cisco Exams

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