Certifications without using the knowledge

Taku_Taku_ Posts: 9Registered Users ■□□□□□□□□□
I work in a computer helpdesk (more like a call center.. we don't do a lot of actual tech work.. we have techs for that) I plan on starting on my B.A this spring at a B&M school. I was thinking since I have this fall to prepare otherwise I believe I should try to get a certification in this time. I really enjoy learning and being in a linux environment, so naturally I think Linux+ would be in order, but maybe Net+ or A+ (even though I wouldnt use a lot of the skills as much)

I am just wanting some opinions and thoughts of on the subject, maybe I won't do either and go learn some programming or web stuff :) thanks for all your opinions in my previous post some time ago, your thoughts and opinions help me even things out.

Comments

  • NetworkVeteranNetworkVeteran Posts: 2,338Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    I plan on starting on my B.A this spring at a B&M school.
    A B.S., especially one related to technology, is typically more helpful for a tech career.
    Certifications without using the knowledge
    Entry-level certifications w/o hands on experience are fine. Do whatever catches your imagination and excites you! It's mostly the intermediate-level certifications that people warn you away from taking without experience. Do take into consideration that most exams expire, both practically and on paper, so it's best to take them no more than a year or so before you need them.

    I would put 80% of your effort into you actual degree. You know, getting the most impressive degree you can appropriate to your chosen vocation, a good gpa, a good school, etc. Also plan for an internship if you can, or look for opportunities to do basic tasks for your techs.

    (Don't be one of those call center guys who ignores the small opportunities to do more technically in hopes of one day being handed a huge opportunity without the grunt work.)
  • Taku_Taku_ Posts: 9Registered Users ■□□□□□□□□□
    ah I probably shouldve said I do already have an a.a.s ( which doesnt transfer or help me at all getting a B.S at all -_- ) I just figure I might try to get a certification in case things go awry and maybe land a better job that would help pay for my tuition, Its a long shot, but it couldn't hurt I guess.
  • PishofPishof Posts: 193Member
    WGU takes AAS as transfer credit and requirements met for several courses with their programs knocking about half of a B.S out. Of course, if you have access to a public B&M and an associates already you may be better off there.
    Courses Left for WGU BS - IT: NA:
    Finished!

    On to VCAP!
  • Patel128Patel128 Posts: 339Member
    I am also getting my B.S. and wanted to possibly get my Linux+ sometime soon. I was also wondering like the op, is the Linux+ worth it?
    Studying For:
    B.S. in Computer Science at University of Memphis
    Network+
    Currently Reading:
    CompTIA Network+ Study Guide - Lammle
  • ChooseLifeChooseLife Posts: 941Member ■■■■■■■□□□
    I'm one of the grouchy old-school Unix guys who will tell you: Learn Linux, don't bother with papers
    “You don’t become great by trying to be great. You become great by wanting to do something, and then doing it so hard that you become great in the process.” (c) xkcd #896

    GetCertified4Less
    - discounted vouchers for certs
  • Patel128Patel128 Posts: 339Member
    Yeah that's what I was leaning towards. Any books that you would recommend for a complete beginner?
    Studying For:
    B.S. in Computer Science at University of Memphis
    Network+
    Currently Reading:
    CompTIA Network+ Study Guide - Lammle
  • ChooseLifeChooseLife Posts: 941Member ■■■■■■■□□□
    Patel128 wrote: »
    Any books that you would recommend for a complete beginner?
    My advice is dated...

    Back in the day, I read these cover to cover:
    http://www.amazon.com/UNIX-System-Administration-Handbook-Bk%5CCD/dp/0131510517
    FreeBSD Handbook
    The Revised Slackware Book Project
    and then did a lot of digging through
    man pages and The Linux Documentation Project

    This approach is old-school and proven to work by generations of unix people, but at the same time there must be many new good books on the market nowadays...
    “You don’t become great by trying to be great. You become great by wanting to do something, and then doing it so hard that you become great in the process.” (c) xkcd #896

    GetCertified4Less
    - discounted vouchers for certs
  • Patel128Patel128 Posts: 339Member
    Thanks for the information. I am going to find a book to read to learn.
    Studying For:
    B.S. in Computer Science at University of Memphis
    Network+
    Currently Reading:
    CompTIA Network+ Study Guide - Lammle
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