CompTIA / Cisco

ch1vasch1vas Member Posts: 81 ■■□□□□□□□□
Hi all,

after working as System Admin for more than a decade, I finally came to the decision to go for a Network Security job and work my way up. My first milestone is to get CEH certified. I browsed through a different forum which recommended following path:
  • A+
  • Security+
  • Network+
  • CCNA
  • CEH
Now I'm curious if I really have to do the first three certs or if I can go for the CCENT + CCNA. Are there any reason to do the first three certs first if I already have a basic - intermediate understanding of Network + Security? I know one will always learn something new, but is it really necessary to go through the first three certs first?

Thank you,
Goal 2013: CCENT (x); CCNA(x); Security+(x); ITIL Foundation ( )

Comments

  • IvanjamIvanjam Member Posts: 978
    Certification is supposed to be simply validation of prior knowledge and experience, so you can dive straight into the CCNA then on to the CEH. The CompTIA trifecta path is usually recommended for people relatively new to IT in a production environment.
    Fall 2014: Start MA in Mathematics [X]
    Fall 2016: Start PhD in Mathematics [X]
  • ptilsenptilsen Member Posts: 2,835 ■■■■■■■■■■
    A decade? Skip the CompTIAs. Here's your path:

    CCNA
    CISSP
    OSCP or MCSE or CCNP or CCNA Security
    Working B.S., Computer Science
    Complete: 55/120 credits SPAN 201, LIT 100, ETHS 200, AP Lang, MATH 120, WRIT 231, ICS 140, MATH 215, ECON 202, ECON 201, ICS 141, MATH 210, LING 111, ICS 240
    In progress: CLEP US GOV,
    Next up: MATH 211, ECON 352, ICS 340
  • NetworkVeteranNetworkVeteran Member Posts: 2,338 ■■■■■■■■□□
    ptilsen wrote: »
    A decade? Skip the CompTIAs.
    Agree. A+ and Network+ are silly for someone with a decade of IT work experience.

    I've heard on this forum that Security+ is required for some security jobs.
  • ch1vasch1vas Member Posts: 81 ■■□□□□□□□□
    ptilsen wrote: »
    A decade? Skip the CompTIAs. Here's your path:

    CCNA
    CISSP
    OSCP or MCSE or CCNP or CCNA Security

    Yes over a decade :). Worked as System Admin, Support, Desktop Service. I was happy the last ten years, but now it's time for some changes.

    Although CISSP sounds very interesting too, is there a reason for not heading for OSCP, CCNP or CCNA Security right after CCNA?
    You didn't mention CEH, is it because it's not worth it or would you do it after CCNA or just because OSCP is considered "better"?
    The OSCx certs sound very very interesting though, probably will replace my CEH choice.

    But for the next months I'll be occupied by studying for the CCENT and CCNA. You might see another post coming from me IF I finally make it to a CCNA cert, regarding next steps.

    Thanks for the quick replies.
    Goal 2013: CCENT (x); CCNA(x); Security+(x); ITIL Foundation ( )
  • ptilsenptilsen Member Posts: 2,835 ■■■■■■■■■■
    CISSP alone can get you a security-related job along with experience. It's a big deal, and required for many jobs.

    OSCP is a fairly advanced pentesting cert. It's definitely better than CEH. CEH is basically about memorizing tools. OSCP shows real skill.

    Keep in mind, there are lots of security jobs other than pentesting. Make sure that's what you really want before you delve into that field.
    Working B.S., Computer Science
    Complete: 55/120 credits SPAN 201, LIT 100, ETHS 200, AP Lang, MATH 120, WRIT 231, ICS 140, MATH 215, ECON 202, ECON 201, ICS 141, MATH 210, LING 111, ICS 240
    In progress: CLEP US GOV,
    Next up: MATH 211, ECON 352, ICS 340
  • dave330idave330i Member Posts: 2,091 ■■■■■■■■■■
    Sec+ & CEH both meet DoD requirements. If you don't plan on working for gov't or plan on getting CEH, no need for sec+.
    2018 Certification Goals: Maybe VMware Sales Cert
    "Simplify, then add lightness" -Colin Chapman
  • GOZCUGOZCU Member Posts: 234
    ptilsen wrote: »
    A decade? Skip the CompTIAs. Here's your path:

    CCNA
    CISSP
    OSCP or MCSE or CCNP or CCNA Security


    icon_thumright.gif
  • al3kt.R***al3kt.R*** Member Posts: 118
    Hello ch1vas,

    I also believe that 10y of work experience will suffice for mastering CCNA & CCNA-Security.
    Now if you are truely into hands-on Network Security but w/o the PenTesting skills (that is Logging, Monitoring, Firewalling, IPS/IDS, NAC, VPNs etc), I'd suggest you follow the former CCSP now CCNP-Security path. Maybe even become a CCIE. That's a lot to learn for Network Security from Cisco's point of view of course. If you like there are Juniper and Checkpoint cert paths available also, which will definitely do the job for the Network Security Engineer.

    Regards and best of luck whatever your choiceicon_cool.gif
    "Tigranes: Good heavens! Mardonius, what kind of men have brought us to fight against? Men who do not compete for possessions, but for honour."--- Herodotus, The Histories
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    "Bruce Schneier's secure handshake is so strong, you won't be able to exchange keys with anyone else for days."--- Bruce Schneier Facts
  • FloOzFloOz Member Posts: 1,614 ■■■■□□□□□□
    Yup I agree with everyone else. You have so much experience behind you that the CompTIA'a wouldn't do you much good.
  • ch1vasch1vas Member Posts: 81 ■■□□□□□□□□
    Thanks for clarifying and punting me into the right direction. Now last but not least a question which probably will split your opinions...

    What about the rumors Network Security Job's are getting less and less because it's getting easier and easier to setup a secure network so company's don't see a need anymore in employing Security professionals?

    The last thing I want is to invest a whole lot of time and money in education just to find out the cert's indeed look good on my resume but I still will need to work as System Admin and maybe go for team lead etc. because Security Jobs will get rare.

    Don't understand me wrong, I'd love to work in the security field, but at the end of the day I have to think about my family and the bills first.

    So before I get excited and start my education for the first steps (CCENT, CCNA) I'd like to hear your opinions on this.

    Thank you again.
    Goal 2013: CCENT (x); CCNA(x); Security+(x); ITIL Foundation ( )
  • ptilsenptilsen Member Posts: 2,835 ■■■■■■■■■■
    ch1vas wrote: »
    What about the rumors Network Security Job's are getting less and less because it's getting easier and easier to setup a secure network so company's don't see a need anymore in employing Security professionals?
    This is the first time I've ever heard anything of this nature. If anything, security is a hot topic these days, and actual employment demand is high for both public and private sectors and not being met by enough professionals. Networks, as they become larger, more complex, and more integrated and converged are, if anything, more difficult to secure.

    I really don't see job security as a valid concern in the infosec arena. The three-letter agencies are constantly whining about a need for more employees, there are lots of private sector jobs, and plenty of money to be made.
    Working B.S., Computer Science
    Complete: 55/120 credits SPAN 201, LIT 100, ETHS 200, AP Lang, MATH 120, WRIT 231, ICS 140, MATH 215, ECON 202, ECON 201, ICS 141, MATH 210, LING 111, ICS 240
    In progress: CLEP US GOV,
    Next up: MATH 211, ECON 352, ICS 340
  • RoguetadhgRoguetadhg Member Posts: 2,472
    I would assume that security is the "In" topic for IT these days. Why?

    Everything needs to be hardened (Less Weaknesses to be exploited). The scope of just defining "Security" is beyond the 'technical' firewalls. There's also the problem with the meat-bag sitting at the keyboard that's unknowingly downloading the latest Java Trojan because she thought she was really going to win a million dollars!

    I'd have to admit, before studying for the Security+ I was more or less devoid of anything. And Im not saying I'm the next penetration testing wizard (Although sporting a cape, and yelling magician-wordings while doing a christmas tree attack would be pretty sweet...). But to put it into perspective from the outside looking in:

    IT has different sub-IT sections: Microsoft, Cisco, Apple, Dell, Hardware, Software, Programming, Project Management, Storage, Security.
    Security has their own facets: Forensics, Penetration Testing, Software testing (White/Gray/Black box), Hacking, Firewall setups, Best Practices. ASA. I mean there's so MUCH that can be applied for JUST for security - it's amazing.

    I still like Cisco though :D
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