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Am I getting to far ahead of myself?

klhatchettklhatchett Member Posts: 29 ■□□□□□□□□□
As I have stated before I am currently studying Infosec and Assurance at a University, and should be graduating by December of 2014, with that being said, I would like to achieve both the Network+ and Security+ certifications before graduating, but I feel a little discouraged when I talk to my peers about my goals. They make me feel as if it will be a waste of money if I try and pursue it this early , since they themselves are waiting until after graduation and since they want to wait and see if an employer will pay for the certs.


What my question is, is should I also do the same as my peers,or should I stick to my guns and pursue the certifications, I feel the certifications will help to give me an advantage over those that want to wait until graduation to achieve any certifications, but I also see the logic in wanting to wait and see if an employer will be willingly to pay for the tests?I know its possible,but is it very likely? Or should I try and stay ahead of the competition? (other students in the program). Any opinion is greatly appreciated!

-K.L.H
Look me up on LinkedIn, Lets Connect! http://www.linkedin.com/in/klhatchett92

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    lsud00dlsud00d Member Posts: 1,571
    Having certs by the time you graduate will give you a leg up forsure. I would recommend Sec+ and CCNA over Sec+ and Net+.

    Look at it like this hypothetical scenario:
    Degree = $40k job, wait and see if employer pays for certs
    Degree + Certs (~$500-600 investment) = $50k job
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    odysseyeliteodysseyelite Member Posts: 504 ■■■■■□□□□□
    Forget your peers, do they pay your bills? Having certs will get you ahead of the game. After I graduated, the first thing companies would ask me is, what certs do you have? I had non at the time. Don't get me wrong, a Degree is worth it, but the college system tends to not stay on top of the latest technology.

    I get the same bs from my peers today. Why are you studying for another cert, reading another book etc. I was like them for awhile. I got comfortable at a job, then I got laid off and saw I had let myself be passed by the times.
    Currently reading: Start with Why: How Great Leaders Inspire Everyone to Take Action
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    ptilsenptilsen Member Posts: 2,835 ■■■■■■■■■■
    Get the certs now. Particularly with these entry-level certs, they will have less value if you wait for an employer to pay for them. By the time you interview for the second job, they probably won't add much to your resume.

    On that note, I wouldn't even wait till graduating to look for jobs. If you can find an IT job that doesn't interfere with school, you will be way ahead of your peers at graduation. The experience at that job will easily be as valuable as your degree in finding your next job.
    Working B.S., Computer Science
    Complete: 55/120 credits SPAN 201, LIT 100, ETHS 200, AP Lang, MATH 120, WRIT 231, ICS 140, MATH 215, ECON 202, ECON 201, ICS 141, MATH 210, LING 111, ICS 240
    In progress: CLEP US GOV,
    Next up: MATH 211, ECON 352, ICS 340
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    klhatchettklhatchett Member Posts: 29 ■□□□□□□□□□
    thanks, for both of your replies, that's exactly I was thinking! it just gets annoying when ever people make me feel as if I am doing something wrong by trying to further my knowledge, in regards to the CCNA,I did plan on also pursuing that cert, but most people recommend I try the Net+ first so that I can form a foundation and since that is something I really need help understanding
    Look me up on LinkedIn, Lets Connect! http://www.linkedin.com/in/klhatchett92
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    Node ManNode Man Member Posts: 668 ■■■□□□□□□□
    I see nothing wrong with getting ahead of yourself, as long as you are behind yourself.
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    dbrinkdbrink Member Posts: 180
    I wouldn't worry about what other classmates are saying, the knowledge you will gain from the entry level certs will put you ahead of a lot of graduates.
    Currently Reading: Learn Python The Hard Way
    http://defendyoursystems.blogspot.com/
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    JayTheCrackerJayTheCracker Member Posts: 169
    when the certificates become related with your modules in your Degree program, the knowledge learnt from the certs will even help u get very very good grades... :)
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    klhatchettklhatchett Member Posts: 29 ■□□□□□□□□□
    Thanks for the words of encouragement everyone! What you are saying is what I was thinking, and I will definitely continue to pursue my goals, and as far as finding work while still in college, that is my goal,I want to get as much experience as possible now,that way once graduation comes around, I have the potential to make more then my peers in the program who decided to wait until graduation to get certified
    Look me up on LinkedIn, Lets Connect! http://www.linkedin.com/in/klhatchett92
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    RoguetadhgRoguetadhg Member Posts: 2,489 ■■■■■■■■□□
    Get your certs, Get your degree. You'll be better off.
    In order to succeed, your desire for success should be greater than your fear of failure.
    TE Threads: How to study for the CCENT/CCNA, Introduction to Cisco Exams

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    UnixGuyUnixGuy Mod Posts: 4,566 Mod
    I passed the CCNA right after my final semester at uni. It's not a big deal, it can help you. Try to get internships and part-time work if you can, this will be gold on your resume.
    Certs: GSTRT, GPEN, GCFA, CISM, CRISC, RHCE

    Learn GRC! GRC Mastery : https://grcmastery.com 

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    lordylordy Member Posts: 632 ■■■■□□□□□□
    Get the certs now. They will basically pay for themselves when you get your first job.

    People who try to save a few hundreds buck on certs don't understand that they would bring a few thousands in the next job.
    Working on CCNP: [X] SWITCH --- [ ] ROUTE --- [ ] TSHOOT
    Goal for 2014: RHCA
    Goal for 2015: CCDP
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    ThePawofRizzoThePawofRizzo Member Posts: 389 ■■■■□□□□□□
    I agree with all here. Get the certs as you can. The CompTIA certs will probably most pay off as you enter the industry anyway since they are more foundational, general knowledge type content. I do agree that CCNA would be much more worthwhile, but if you would take Sec+ and CCNA, I'd go ahead and knock out Net+ just for the bonus. After the first two you'd pretty much have studied most anything the Net+ covers, and could sit for it easily. It would just give you the extra padding in the ol' resume.
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    kurosaki00kurosaki00 Member Posts: 973
    You should circle yourself with a bit more knowledgeful peers then
    I cant believe nowadays in IT/Systems people still talk like that
    Get the certs!
    If you find an employer that will pay for your certs, you will get more certs, Sec+ and net+ are just the tip of the iceberg.
    Be the best you can, apply for the best jobs you can.
    meh
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    instant000instant000 Member Posts: 1,745
    Am I getting too far ahead of myself?

    No, you're getting too far ahead of your friends!
    I would like to achieve both the Network+ and Security+ certifications before graduating


    Like others, I feel that you are aiming a bit low, to be pursuing Network+. If you're pursuing Information Security, CCNA:Security could be seen as a very reasonable goal.

    What my question is, is should I also do the same as my peers,or should I stick to my guns and pursue the certifications


    LOL. Definition of peer pressure: They're pressuring you to do what they're doing. You came to the right site if you want to be encouraged to pursue your goal of certification. We can help you find the right tools to do the job right.



    I feel the certifications will help to give me an advantage over those that want to wait until graduation to achieve any certifications


    It will.
    Here are the possible job candidates (given that you and your peers get degrees anyway):
    Certs | Exp
    -----------
     No   | No
     No   | Yes
     Yes  | No
     Yes  | Yes
    


    I noticed from reading your LinkedIn profile that you're currently working as an Information Technology Assistant. This is VALUABLE experience! Coupled with the degree, you'll be knocking out 2/3 things you'd hope to be looking for.

    The three areas you can work on (to make yourself more skilled in a field) are experience, education, and certification. You need to have a tiebreaker in your advantage. Experience is very valuable, as someone who's done the job before probably knows how to do it again.

    but I also see the logic in wanting to wait and see if an employer will be willingly to pay for the tests?

    If you do the math, it doesn't make sense. (A prior poster already provided an example.) Since you've studied business, I'm sure that there has to be some sort of decision analysis they covered, with regards to comparing outcomes, based upon different inputs. I am not saying it'll promise you a job (nothing can do that). I am saying that you can take charge of the inputs, and make sure that you're selling a quality product (yourself).

    I know its possible,but is it very likely?


    The only employer-funded programs that I have seen usually stipulate an additional year of employment, in exchange for sending an employee for any sort of training/education. As a result, I've never taken advantage of one of those programs, and have self-funded the certifications that I have. If you just want to work at the same place for an extended period of time, then it would be something great to take advantage of. I would think that many employers have these programs.

    Or should I try and stay ahead of the competition? (other students in the program).


    You hit the nail on the head. Yes, you should definitely stay ahead of your competition. You must differentiate yourself. If you all go to the same school, what makes them any better or worse? The difference then would be additional experience or certification that you can bring to the table. Strive to be the superior candidate.

    As far as additional tips, I would advise also getting a good handle on the rules and regulations that are common in the industry. Go beyond what's covered in the courses, and thoroughly read the regulations, commentaries on the regulations, industry, and develop your own idea on how things work.

    I just peeked at your LinkedIn page, and your interests appear to be 'nix, database, perl, python, and pen testing.

    As you obviously know that you need a greater grasp on Networking and Security, I would further advise that you make sure to pursue vendor-neutral knowledge in networks and operating systems. It will make your current job, degree program, and any certifications that much easier. You can be a much more effective planner, implementer, and troubleshooter, if you truly understand what's really going on. Also, it'll make securing things a lot more simple, when you understand how they really work.

    Hope this helps!
    Currently Working: CCIE R&S
    LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/lewislampkin (Please connect: Just say you're from TechExams.Net!)
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    klhatchettklhatchett Member Posts: 29 ■□□□□□□□□□
    thank you very much instant000 everything you said makes since, can't believe I almost let peer pressure stop me from trying to achieve, which in my opinion are not to far fetched, thanks again everyone, definitely going to look more into CCNA instead of the Network+ and I am going to continue to set high, but attainable goals for myself
    Look me up on LinkedIn, Lets Connect! http://www.linkedin.com/in/klhatchett92
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    ajs1976ajs1976 Member Posts: 1,945 ■■■■□□□□□□
    Get some certs and experience now if you can. Every little bit helps.
    Andy

    2020 Goals: 0 of 2 courses complete, 0 of 2 exams complete
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    N2ITN2IT Inactive Imported Users Posts: 7,483 ■■■■■■■■■■
    Sounds like a good plan to me. Getting the CCNA would be a awesome win IMO.
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