CCIE - Average Hours spent studying?

010101010101 Posts: 68Member ■■□□□□□□□□
I see a lot of people posting how many hours they've spent studying for their CCIE.
Has anyone kept track of this?
I'm curious, on average, how many hours does it take for someone to acquire a CCIE.

I know there are tons of variables like if you have a CCNP, if you work in a large datacenter, etc, etc.
But on average, how long does it seem to take people?

Does 900-1,300 hours or so sound about right?


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Comments

  • NetworkVeteranNetworkVeteran Posts: 2,338Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    I've seen averages quoted in the ballpark of 750-1250 or 800-1600 to pass the lab, assuming you already have your CCNP.

    Of course, plenty have put in more hours, without attaining anything. ;)

    The written? Hardly any is required, in my experience.
  • NetworkVeteranNetworkVeteran Posts: 2,338Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    I would add, you should almost certainly earn your CCNP before you begin.
  • silver145silver145 Posts: 265Member
    The vibe i got is that the hours spent revising are a "hmm, look at me, i have 2000 hours under my belt, smiley face"

    Where as all they show is "awww, poor dude spent 2000 hours behind a router icon_sad.gif" haha.

    I see it more as a badge we can wear more than a, RIGHT, 200 DOWN 800 TOGO AND I WILL PASS.

    Revise untill your ready, fail when your not, keep going!
  • gorebrushgorebrush Posts: 2,741Member
    The advice I was given early on was - 200 reading, 1000 labbing.

    That sounds reasonable to me. I can do around 50 hours max a week - that means about 20 weeks to attain that 1000 hours if I really put my mind to it.
  • reaper81reaper81 Posts: 631Member
    I spent about 250h for the written and somewhere around 1200h for the lab. I was a CCNP before starting.

    It all depends on your goals. Do you just want to squeak by or do you really want to know your stuff? :)
    Daniel Dib
    CCIE #37149
  • sea_turtlesea_turtle Posts: 98Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    At the moment ive put in maybe.....100-150h for the written (alot of that was re-reading over and over since life was so busy) and as of now maybe 250-300 hours of labbing. im still getting humbled on almost a daily basis by either stupid mistakes (selecting the incorrect way to solve something or not solving it correctly) or just outright not being able to remember/find it in the DOC-CD.

    While i can see at work that im growing into a monster when i get behind one of these workbooks/practice labs it can be very frustrating.
  • instant000instant000 Posts: 1,745Member
    I've seen people clear the written with just 100 hours of study, and we've seen in this thread where people say 250+. I don't religously track the hours that I've been studying, but I can confidently say that I'm still not ready for the written and I've put in well over 200 hours so far, and I completed the 'NP a few months back this year. My best advice to anyone attempting it is to start studying for it as soon as you clear the 'NP, and don't slack off for a month or two, as that sets you back further than anything else, as you have to refresh on things you had cold just a little while earlier.

    I see that in one of the more recently successful threads (Zartanasaurus (sp?)), the author used a spaced-repetition method. In NetworkVeteran's thread, he also seems to be using a spaced repetition method, so I'm predicting success on that one in advance. This method of preparation makes the most sense to me, as you have the greatest assurance that you're keeping things fresh. Flash cards do require some effort and individuality (what I might forget easily is probably different from what you might forget easily), but they can't be beat for doing quick daily reviews.

    Once I clear the written, I'll be able to post a much more meaningful post about what preparation is required. Right now, I know that I'm not ready, so I know that 200 hours isn't enough for me.

    Hope this helps.
    Currently Working: CCIE R&S
    LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/lewislampkin (Please connect: Just say you're from TechExams.Net!)
  • carterw65carterw65 Posts: 318Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    I think some are putting way to much into the written. The first time I took it I couldn't believe how easy it seemed. This last time was harder, but I can't imagine putting in more than 200 hours studying for it, and that is on the very high side. If you know the CCNP books inside and out, you can pass the written. Get that thing done and move on to labbing. I didn't say quit reading though. Keep reading and learning from books too.

    As far as the lab is concerned, well, I'll let you know when I get there! LOL It does seem though that many put in around a 1000 hours or more though before they attempt. So that is my goal. I will put in as many hours as possible before that day. If I can take the lab sooner (Currently Mar 2014), I might move the date up, but I don't see that happening. I will most likely move the date to May when they open up slots at my location.
  • reaper81reaper81 Posts: 631Member
    It all depends on your method of attack for the lab. Sure you can pass the written quite easily at an earlier stage but all theory will help you have a foundation when you start labbing.

    People underestimate the reading required for the lab. They think after passing the written it's all labs but it's not. Reading is still very important, especially RFCs and standards to see how things really should behave.
    Daniel Dib
    CCIE #37149
  • ScalesScales Posts: 95Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    other than to track your own study time, does it really matter how long it takes you?
  • IsmaeljrpIsmaeljrp Posts: 480Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    Scales wrote: »
    other than to track your own study time, does it really matter how long it takes you?

    It might be a thing of curiosity. " How long does it take to master this ? " is a very popular question. It can be of help when you are trying to prepare a training schedule. Then again, rarely anything goes to according to plan, but at least he can have an estimate and maybe no waist too much time overtraining in fear of not passing the test. Not everyone likes the idea of losing a few hundred bucks.
  • reaper81reaper81 Posts: 631Member
    Not really. It's good for people starting out knowing what they are undertaking themselves.

    Most people that start studying for the CCIE never finish, that is the hard truth. It takes a lot out of you. It's massive hours, little family time and sometimes life just gets in the way.
    Daniel Dib
    CCIE #37149
  • instant000instant000 Posts: 1,745Member
    To echo what Daniel said (though he can undoubtedly speak form experience on this), I feel that all my preparation is towards the lab, even the preparation towards the written. Some people mention that the clock starts ticking from the time you pass the written, to when you first attempt the lab. Depending upon your budget, you might want to hold off on the written until you think you're in shape to make a push for the final portion. I dunno. I just feel like I don't know things "cold" so there is no reason to be booking a written when I feel like I don't know stuff yet.

    My time to prepare can vary by topic. I spent about thirty minutes this evening getting a good method set up so that I wouldn't forget NAT order of operations. The key for me? (Realizing that NAT occurs after routing on inside-to-outside, and before routing on outside-to-inside). I made something to remember it by, and I'll probably post it on the forums in a few minutes.
    Currently Working: CCIE R&S
    LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/lewislampkin (Please connect: Just say you're from TechExams.Net!)
  • carterw65carterw65 Posts: 318Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    I guess it is a mind-set for me. Get rid of the written and get it behind me so I can focus on labbing. Of course all the studying and preparation helps in passing the lab. I personally would hate to be trying to lab while still having the written gnawing at me in the back of my mind.
  • powmiapowmia Posts: 322Users Awaiting Email Confirmation
    carterw65 wrote: »
    I guess it is a mind-set for me. Get rid of the written and get it behind me so I can focus on labbing. Of course all the studying and preparation helps in passing the lab. I personally would hate to be trying to lab while still having the written gnawing at me in the back of my mind.

    When you're ready for the lab, the written should be as difficult as a 3rd grade spelling test. I never prepared for the written, just the lab. When I felt ready for the lab, I knocked out the written and scheduled my lab for a month later. There's absolutely no need to rush the written.
  • Mrock4Mrock4 Posts: 2,360Banned
    I passed my written and thought the reading was over. Then I constantly found myself going back and reading during my lab prep..so reading never ends!!

    I spent somewhere around 1,000 hours - that is between written and lab. Of course I do this fulltime also, so that counts, in my opinion.
  • gorebrushgorebrush Posts: 2,741Member
    Everyone's brain just works differently. I did the CCIE Written with 160 odd hours read, I probably got have gotten by with less.

    But I have been working with Cisco gear since 2008, and I've got a CCNA and CCNP too. So just saying "X hours and I'm done" just isn't full indication.
  • nerdydadnerdydad Posts: 261Member
    I never know how people keep track of that, I read whenever I have a chance, some days I get in 5 minutes, others I get in 5 hours, and as Mrock said, sometimes I read for work, but it is directly related to my studies. My slogan when it comes to study has been, don't waste time keeping track of what you have done, just do more.
  • FlyingputFlyingput Posts: 114Member
    It's painful to prepare for written/lab. It's more frustrating after 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th....failure. The other voice guy who was on his 6th when I did my 1st. He didn't want to talk. He looked tired. On my 2nd attempt, the other guy was on his 4th. At the end, I guess it doesn't matter how many hours we have spent. Go get that number!
  • hurricane1091hurricane1091 Posts: 918Member
    This is an old thread, but I need to ask. How do people only put in 200 hours for the written? I assume you read all the books (which, seems to be about 8 on average, sometimes more). That's like 5000 pages at least. Even if you read a page every 3 minutes which seems unlikely with notes, that's over 200 hours alone. Just trying to gauge what people go through. I've always studied by reading, taking notes, googling, and labbing as I go. I do not read a book, then go back and lab. I always lab as I go and always take notes as I go. I go back and lab again and again after I am done reading though.
  • Dieg0MDieg0M Posts: 861Member
    Took me 220 hours for the written right after I passed the CCNP. It took an additional 700-800 lab hours after the written. Lost track after 800ish hours but I had a pretty accurate count going on in my CCIE journey blog posts.
    Follow my CCDE journey at www.routingnull0.com
  • hurricane1091hurricane1091 Posts: 918Member
    Dieg0M wrote: »
    Took me 220 hours for the written right after I passed the CCNP. It took an additional 700-800 lab hours after the written. Lost track after 800ish hours but I had a pretty accurate count going on in my CCIE journey blog posts.

    How many books did you read for the written and did you take notes? I feel like I can't read 8 books and take notes that fast. I tend to lab as I go as well, so it would be a different process for me.
  • Dieg0MDieg0M Posts: 861Member
    How many books did you read for the written and did you take notes? I feel like I can't read 8 books and take notes that fast. I tend to lab as I go as well, so it would be a different process for me.

    https://routingnull0.com/2013/12/21/hour-220-ccie-written-passed/
    Follow my CCDE journey at www.routingnull0.com
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