Paid for time Studying\Research for Company benifit

tris179tris179 Posts: 12Member ■□□□□□□□□□
I was wondering what peoples thoughts are on this, just out of pure interest more than anything.

I now we all do a lot of home studying\research, one because I'm sure we really enjoy it and two because we really don't get time in the office that we would like to spend on researching new technologies which in turn sometimes leads to gaining certifications. Which all benefit both ourselves and the company's we work for.

At what point does that the time we spend on this become something that we should be able to claim in part of our salary or overtime? or should there be more allowance for this to be done as part of the working day. For example, people that go on a course for a week would be within office hours as therefore as part of their pay. So does this make other methods of research any different. Especially when its expected as part of some our role. Whereas some others will do there 9-5 job and that's that.

I'm sure in reality it should be a little bit of both; but would be interested to know your comments

Cheers

Comments

  • NetworkVeteranNetworkVeteran Posts: 2,338Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    researching new technologies which in turn sometimes leads to gaining certifications. Which all benefit both ourselves and the company's we work for.

    I don't agree. Suppose you were hired onto a level-1 helpdesk. Your colleagues typically have an A+ and/or Network+ and Security+. You decide to pursue a CCNA. Naively, this "helps" your current employer because you're more knowledgeable about networking. Realistically, you're preparing for your next role / pay raise, and becoming over-qualified for the role they hired you for.

    The reality of certification is we're looking to move up, which isn't always in-line with our employer's goals.
    At what point does that the time we spend on this become something that we should be able to claim in part of our salary or overtime?
    Typically when you're behind your colleagues, and need to catch-up to perform your role adequately. Alternatively, when technology changes, and everyone on your team needs to adapt to keep pace with it.
    people that go on a course for a week would be within office hours as therefore as part of their pay.
    When attending a course is essential to performing one's duties, employers are quick to send employees for training!
  • tris179tris179 Posts: 12Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    Thanks for the reply, I didn't see it from that angle.... Yes some of the certifications that individuals could be perusing are indeed outside of the employers goals, and therefore I would expect to be outside the scope... That was one thing I didn't consider in my post.

    The your other comments do clarify my thoughts somewhat.
  • apr911apr911 Posts: 379Member ■■■■□□□□□□
    This is similar to a discussion previously had here:
    http://www.techexams.net/forums/general-certification/84055-studying-while-work-2.html

    This can and often times does go either way and it really depends on your company's policies and the valuation they place on things such as certifications. Your role within the company also plays a large part in this as well.

    As NetworkVeteran pointed out, I cant think of many companies that would be happy to have an L1 Helpdesk Admin working on certifications while on the clock. You're low on the totem pole, you're often times expected to be a high-volume ticket cruncher and filter the stuff that gets escalated. Many organizations are also very structured in the lower tiers when it comes to troubleshooting and have a "playbook" of things to try before kicking to the next level. So how does you getting certified benefit the company in this situation?

    You're out of the queue, so you arent pushing through tickets or filtering stuff and really basic reading comprehension may be all that's required for your role. Whats more is, again as NetworkVeteran pointed out, when you get that certificate you are likely to want more pay or a promotion.

    Whats a company to do if they dont have a role open for you to be promoted into? Or they dont think your ready to be promoted? You arent likely "worth" a raise and regardless of how easily replaced you are, they still have to incur a loss in replacing you (hiring, training, etc) if you do decide to leave (or are promoted).

    Now that's for low-level admins. My view does change significantly as you start getting into higher level roles but then of course you arent as easily replaced and the expectations upon you are greater. Of course there is also the fact that by the time you make into a higher level role, its likely you already have a number of certs and it is unlikely you'll be working on acquiring several more in a short period.

    I havent acquired a "NEW" certification in almost 2 years. Its not because I stopped going for certs but the certification period has become elongated. Ive started studying for my CCIE but wont be ready to take it for some months yet and most of my other studying time has been spent on maintaining or updating my existing certifications (I did get my MCSE 2012 this year but that was an upgrade to my MCSE 2003/MCITP 200icon_cool.gif.

    So yes at some point it does become valuable to the company to provide you study time but usually by that point they arent really providing you study time so much as you are finding study time during your slow periods at work which you are coming across as a function of your higher level.
    Currently Working On: Openstack
    2017 Goals: MCSE Refresh, CCDP & CCIE:Security
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