Reviewing CISSP practice questions

ChooseLifeChooseLife Member Posts: 941 ■■■■■■■□□□
Some of the CISSP practice questions I come across are not black-and-white, and to master "ISC2 way of reasoning" I hope to get some comments from the wise of TE as to why a certain answer is considered correct.
“You don’t become great by trying to be great. You become great by wanting to do something, and then doing it so hard that you become great in the process.” (c) xkcd #896

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Comments

  • ChooseLifeChooseLife Member Posts: 941 ■■■■■■■□□□
    First question, which answer is correct and why?
    Q1. John is reviewing database products. He needs a product that can manipulate astandard set of data for his company’s business logic needs. Which of the following should the necessary product implement?

    A. Relational database structure
    B. Object-relational database structure
    C. Network database structure
    D. Dynamic-static structure
    “You don’t become great by trying to be great. You become great by wanting to do something, and then doing it so hard that you become great in the process.” (c) xkcd #896

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  • netstatnetstat Member Posts: 65 ■■□□□□□□□□
    Since i am currently studying for the CISSP too, i will try help out. I would answer A - Relational DB Structure as it should be enough for "business logic needs".

    Object-Relational DB - Never heard or used this term but apparently (wiki) it does exists. Either way, to me it seems like an Object-Oriented DB which i don't see it fitting for the basic requirements of the question.

    Network DB - Again, i don't see it fitting for the basic requirements of the question.

    Dynamic-Static structure - Never heard of it.
  • ChooseLifeChooseLife Member Posts: 941 ■■■■■■■□□□
    Thanks for tackling it... The answer they have as correct is different from yours... Any more ideas?
    “You don’t become great by trying to be great. You become great by wanting to do something, and then doing it so hard that you become great in the process.” (c) xkcd #896

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  • netstatnetstat Member Posts: 65 ■■□□□□□□□□
    I think i found it. Given software development is not my forte' this one was not easy and it is not clear cut in any of the books i'm using.

    However, in Shon Harris' book, the term business logic seems to be linked with "objects". Which means that when business logic is required, the database required is an object-relational DB.
  • ChooseLifeChooseLife Member Posts: 941 ■■■■■■■□□□
    netstat wrote: »
    However, in Shon Harris' book, the term business logic seems to be linked with "objects". Which means that when business logic is required, the database required is an object-relational DB.
    This is correct. The question is from Shon Harris and she somehow linked "business" with "objects" in the explanation. I'm using Conrad's book, so it was not clear how the two relate. Sounds pretty artifical if you ask me, but at least now I know - thank you! :)
    “You don’t become great by trying to be great. You become great by wanting to do something, and then doing it so hard that you become great in the process.” (c) xkcd #896

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  • JDMurrayJDMurray MSIT InfoSec, CISSP, SSCP, GSEC, EnCE, C|EH, CySA+, PenTest+, CASP+, Security+ Surf City, USAAdmin Posts: 11,665 Admin
    There are "relational databases" and "object-oriented databases." These are two completely different models of database design. I'm guessing "object-relational" is a marketing term that Oracle came up with to sell their (hybrid) object database concepts that (supposidly) overcome the shortcomings of the purely object-oriented database model. Oracle = business is Shon's reasoning, I'm also guessing...
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