Looking to get my A+ certification....how many desktops are in use today?

jettiltonjettilton Registered Users Posts: 2 ■□□□□□□□□□
Hello, New to forum!

Contemplating getting my A+ certification, wanting to switch career gears to PC tech,

Have been out of corporate world for a while, how many desktops are still actually in use? Are laptops permitted and how does the A+ certification take this into consideration? What about the use of tablets, etc.? Seems like the workforce is becoming more mobile these days, just wondering if this is covered by the latest Mike Meyers book?

Thanks

Jet

Comments

  • PlantwizPlantwiz Alligator wrestler Mod Posts: 5,057 Mod
    Welcome!

    I am failing to see how your question has anything to do with an a+ aside does Mike Meyers book help get one prepared for the exams...and that I can say YES.

    Aside from that, your other questions have no baring on the certification. What each business, and even industry choices to do varies. Some are quick to upgrade everything, others hold on to their investment. Neither decision has any baring on the objectives as published by CompTIA. So, for concerns about what is on the exam, please download a current copy of the objectives. Meyers text is very good to use as a resource to prepare, though the exam does recommend candidates have some experience. Volunteer or job shadow if your experience is limited.
    Plantwiz
    _____
    "Grammar and spelling aren't everything, but this is a forum, not a chat room. You have plenty of time to spell out the word "you", and look just a little bit smarter." by Phaideaux

    ***I'll add you can Capitalize the word 'I' to show a little respect for yourself too.

    'i' before 'e' except after 'c'.... weird?
  • --chris----chris-- Member Posts: 1,518 ■■■■■□□□□□
    jettilton wrote: »
    Hello, New to forum!

    Contemplating getting my A+ certification, wanting to switch career gears to PC tech,

    Have been out of corporate world for a while, how many desktops are still actually in use? Are laptops permitted and how does the A+ certification take this into consideration? What about the use of tablets, etc.? Seems like the workforce is becoming more mobile these days, just wondering if this is covered by the latest Mike Meyers book?

    Thanks

    Jet

    Check the Compita A+ objectives on the site for full details. But in short, yes A+ covers (in detail) laptops, portables, and all sorts of desktop variables (thin client, domains, ad hoc, etc...).

    It also covers the basics of networking (setup, equipment, troubleshooting). Windows OS install/upgrades, maintenance, troubleshooting, utilities, CLI etc. As well as all the most common hardware (AT/ATX/ITX/BTX mobo's, RAM types/use, HDD types/use, interface types/use, CPUs and sockets, BIOS, firmware for basic routers...)....the list can go on and on. Go get the objectives, and read through them all.
  • jettiltonjettilton Registered Users Posts: 2 ■□□□□□□□□□
    Got a chance to go to B&N to peruse the latest edition, and it does have a section on mobile devices and laptops....When I looked at the previous edition online, It seemed to be mostly focused on the use of desktop systems, and was just wondering how up-to-date the exam was.

    I was only asking because I have been out of the corporate environment, and was just curious because you hear so much about companies letting their employees bring their own laptops, devices, to work, just wondered how this affects a PC Tech's job now since it's not just desktops...
  • TechGuy215TechGuy215 Explore_Dream_Discover Philadelphia, PAMember Posts: 404 ■■■■□□□□□□
    You will still find the desktops are the standard in a business environment. This is for a couple of reasons:

    1. They are cheaper to purchase vs a laptop.
    2. They are cheaper to repair vs a laptop.
    3. They are easier to roll out large imaging deployments.
    4. Physical security, no one is going to take a desktop home possibly lose it.
    5. Network security, desktops are hardwired, while laptops can access wireless.
    6. Most corporates require laptops to have a POA level encryption, with desktops you can avoid these costs.

    And as far as the BYOD to work, that's fairly new and you will find not very many companies allow personal devices on their network.

    Just my thoughts anyways... :)
    * Currently pursuing: PhD: Information Security and Information Assurance
    * Certifications: CISSP, CEH, CHFI, CCNA:Sec, CCNA:R&S, CWNA, ITILv3, VCA-DCV, LPIC-1, A+, Network+, Security+, Linux+, Project+, and many more...
    * Degrees: MSc: Cybersecurity and Information Assurance; BSc: Information Technology - Security; AAS: IT Network Systems Administration
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