Question on the math behind Asymmetric Encryption

JockVSJockJockVSJock Posts: 1,118Member
So I'm studying Cryptology with Eric Conrad's book and I'm trying to understand that math behind Asymmetric Encryption. The subject areas are factoring prime numbers and also discrete logarithm, alot of theory and I just don't see how it applies right now.

Eric does a pretty good job on explaining stuff, however I'm was wondering if someone could break it down even further.
***Freedom of Speech, Just Watch What You Say*** Example, Beware of CompTIA Certs (Deleted From Google Cached)

"Its easier to deceive the masses then to convince the masses that they have been deceived."
-unknown

Comments

  • da_vatoda_vato Posts: 445Member
    To obtain your answer I think you're going to have to find a comprehensive cryptography book because all of the security books I have read don't get that deep in the weeds. Even on the CISSP exam they don't ask that deep you will need to know which is accomplished through what means like:
    Eliptic curve is based on the algebraic structure of elliptic curves over finite fields

    or

    RSA is Based on difficulty of factoring a number which is the product of two large prime numbers

  • TeKniquesTeKniques OSCE, OSCP, CISSP, CISA, SSCP, MCSE (03), Security+, Network+, A+, Project+ Posts: 1,262Member ■■■■□□□□□□
    Hello,

    Here is a SANs paper that goes into the math of Asymmetrical Cryptography:

    http://www.giac.org/paper/gsec/2183/mathematical-underpinnings-asymmetric-cryptography/103707
  • uhclemuhclem Posts: 1Registered Users ■□□□□□□□□□
    Well it really depends on what level you want to understand this?
    Conceptual? Doing the math yourself? Writing your own code? Designing a new method?

    The above SANS paper is pretty good overview.

    There are articles that will explain the algorithms in more detail and books that will show how to write the code (big number arithmetic).

    If you have 6 weeks to spare, I recommend this Coursera Crypto course which covers RSA about halfway in.

    https://www.coursera.org/course/crypto


    Dave.
  • JDMurrayJDMurray Certification Invigilator Surf City, USAPosts: 11,257Admin Admin
    You won't need to know math for the CISSP beyond XOR and ALE/SLE/ARO, so don't let it distract you from what you really need to study.
  • cyberguyprcyberguypr Senior Member Posts: 6,721Mod Mod
    I was going to comment along the same line of JD. CISSP just scratches the surface on many topics. The understanding that you must have for many things is very high level. If you really want to know how something works, that's fine, but things such as Crypto are better left untouched unless you have a genuine interest. As much as I was interested in that crypto Coursera course, the math kept me away.
  • JockVSJockJockVSJock Posts: 1,118Member
    uhclem wrote: »
    Well it really depends on what level you want to understand this?
    Conceptual? Doing the math yourself? Writing your own code? Designing a new method?

    The above SANS paper is pretty good overview.

    There are articles that will explain the algorithms in more detail and books that will show how to write the code (big number arithmetic).

    If you have 6 weeks to spare, I recommend this Coursera Crypto course which covers RSA about halfway in.

    https://www.coursera.org/course/crypto


    Dave.


    Excellent, this is what I'm looking for.

    For some reason, I'm really fascinated with the subject of Cryptology.
    ***Freedom of Speech, Just Watch What You Say*** Example, Beware of CompTIA Certs (Deleted From Google Cached)

    "Its easier to deceive the masses then to convince the masses that they have been deceived."
    -unknown
  • cfirstencfirsten Posts: 42Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    Decent article on encryption. Too deep for the CISSP exam but interesting nevertheless for the curious mind.

    Performance Analysis of Data Encryption Algorithms
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