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Working on getting into IT

bklg1504bklg1504 Member Posts: 5 ■□□□□□□□□□
I am currently finishing up my associates online and moving into my bachelor of science in information technology but am trying to decide if I should go into networking or the security side? I think I would enjoy either side so I guess it comes down to more about stability, pay, and room for advancing. I am also currently studying for my A+ and then already plan on doing my Network+ after. I would appreciate any and all advice.

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    EssendonEssendon Member Posts: 4,546 ■■■■■■■■■■
    Honestly, you should be trying to get your first IT job. Worry about a specialization later. Who knows what you'll end up really liking when you actually start working an IT job. Stability/pay/whatever else all follow you if your good at whatever you do, be it security/systems/storage etc etc.

    In addition, do not wait to complete a cert before you start applying for a job. Apply now, the cert may or may not help you land an interview. A cert isnt a magic ticket to a job, only gives you a leg up over the competition. Furthermore, dozens of people applying for a job will already hold the cert your aspiring to get.

    All of the above may come across as really discouraging and make me sound like the most pessimistic guy out there, but that's not my intention. I only want to put across the message. IT is a great field to be in, but you've got to keep evolving to stay ahead of most of the general masses. Keep applying, keep studying, keep certifying and above all work hard at your job and you'll get all you want - stability, pay, advancement and satisfaction.

    Good luck!
    NSX, NSX, more NSX..

    Blog >> http://virtual10.com
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    bklg1504bklg1504 Member Posts: 5 ■□□□□□□□□□
    I should have probably said at the beginning of the thread that I am looking for entry level IT jobs and actually have an interview for a help desk support position with training involved. It definitely would be a start for me. You definitely didn't discourage me just gave me some more to think about. My adviser asked me what concentration I wanted to go into for my Bachelors and so it also made me think about it and try and figure it out.

    Thanks for all of the input though.
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    instant000instant000 Member Posts: 1,745
    I'll give my two cents. Take the highest maths you can. This provides your more options on majors in the future, if you decide to do Computer Science, for example.
    Currently Working: CCIE R&S
    LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/lewislampkin (Please connect: Just say you're from TechExams.Net!)
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    IsmaeljrpIsmaeljrp Member Posts: 480 ■■■□□□□□□□
    IT is so big, and there are a lot of interesting fields, not just the mainstream networking/security/systems stuff. instant gave some valuable advice in taking advanced math courses. At least reach calculus, and get a basic statistics course. Going for the A+ and N+ is a good start, and having the interview is a good sign that at least your resume is in decent shape. The first year or so shouldn't be about choosing what you're gonna specialize right away, expose yourself to different things while also studying. You might have already gotten a taste for most things IT, i.e. storage, servers, routers and switches, security, wireless. You can also try out things like databases, software development, virtualization etc.
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    redzredz Member Posts: 265 ■■■□□□□□□□
    Go SAN Admin/Engineer. Everyone needs one and nobody is one. Ooh, or go DBA; you ever see a DBA out of work? Nobody has. Everyone is a network engineer or a security consultant. Be a trout, man! Go STORAGE ADMIN!

    Generally to get into security, you need to be doing something that isn't security. You don't just "go security". I mean you could, I guess, but I would say it's a rarity. A lot of people I know got into security by doing something else, getting security certifications, then using those to leverage current employers for more security-related responsibility, then, BOOM, security experience. That's how I did it, and it's how most of my friends did it (who weren't whatever IA MOS in the military).

    EDIT: MOS is not Microsoft Office Specialist, hover-text.
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