Digital Attack Map

jibbajabbajibbajabba Posts: 4,317Member ■■■■■■■■□□
My own knowledge base made public: http://open902.com :p

Comments

  • BGravesBGraves Posts: 339Member
    That's awesome, thanks for sharing!
  • phoeneousphoeneous Go ping yourself... Posts: 2,333Member ■■■■■■■□□□
    How is it classified as an attack if source AND destination is unknown?
  • tpatt100tpatt100 Posts: 2,989Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    Yeah the US sure is doing something there.....
  • N2ITN2IT Posts: 7,483Inactive Imported Users
    Thanks for the map. I appreciate it I shared it with others.
  • coffeeluvrcoffeeluvr Senior Member NCPosts: 734Member ■■■■■□□□□□
    Thanks for the link to the map!!
    "Something feels funny, I must be thinking too hard. - Pooh"
  • JustFredJustFred Posts: 678Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    Thanks, very very interesting
    [h=2]"After a time, you may find that having is not so pleasing a thing, after all, as wanting. It is not logical, but it is often true." Spock[/h]
  • f0rgiv3nf0rgiv3n Posts: 594Member ■■■■□□□□□□
  • YFZbluYFZblu Posts: 1,462Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    tpatt100 wrote: »
    Yeah the US sure is doing something there.....

    From the FAQ section of the site:

    Q: Does an attack's source country indicate the location of the attacker?

    A: Usually not. The source of an attack can (and often is) forged to appear as though it is initiated from a different location and, when accurate, usually represents the location of an infected computer being used in a botnet.


    Addtitionally the website explains this traffic is collected from ISP customers who voluntarily donate their statistical data to the project. I'd be interested to know how much of these perceived attacks are actually just misconfigured devices and/or anomalies in internet traffic; we'll likely never know of course, because the identity of the endpoints is kept anonymous and this is a bird's eye view of the data.

    Not to say that the internet isn't a hotbed of malicious activity, because it certainly is. But these types of maps, imo, are inherently flawed. It's an intriguing display of statistical data at first glance but likely doesn't represent much value to us because we can't contextualize any of it.
  • tpatt100tpatt100 Posts: 2,989Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    YFZblu wrote: »
    From the FAQ section of the site:

    Q: Does an attack's source country indicate the location of the attacker?

    A: Usually not. The source of an attack can (and often is) forged to appear as though it is initiated from a different location and, when accurate, usually represents the location of an infected computer being used in a botnet.


    Addtitionally the website explains this traffic is collected from ISP customers who voluntarily donate their statistical data to the project. I'd be interested to know how much of these perceived attacks are actually just misconfigured devices and/or anomalies in internet traffic; we'll likely never know of course, because the identity of the endpoints is kept anonymous and this is a bird's eye view of the data.

    Not to say that the internet isn't a hotbed of malicious activity, because it certainly is. But these types of maps, imo, are inherently flawed. It's an intriguing display of statistical data at first glance but likely doesn't represent much value to us because we can't contextualize any of it.

    Yeah I read the FAQ but I spent some time checking peak activity in the past just for fun to see how the graphs look.

    Probably a lot of old WinXP boxes adding to the charts....
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