CUCM call pattern length matching with variables question

ande0255ande0255 Banned Posts: 1,178
Not sure if my brain is just fried, but it seems in the INE videos for voice, Mark Snow lays out the following example:

If calling 1001, the numbers 10XX and 1X0X are equal matches, because both X's represent 0-9 and will therefor both need to be equally translated.

It later goes into searching matching patterns belonging to different partitions but on the same CSS, and my question is this:

You are dialing 1001 to the following CSS:

CSS_Test_A
-Partition_A
--1X0X
-Partition_B
--10XX

Would this be subject to partition selection based on top-down order due to matching patterns, or does the match of 10XX win the search because of it's consecutive number matches in the first two digits (similar to IP route selection) despite the fact that they have an equal number of variables?

Again I may be fried, let me know if that's not clear, I'm just too brain dead to google-fu this right now, and hopefully someone else will stumble upon this one day and will also be enlightened.

Thanks for any clarification!

EDIT:

Edited the CSS / Partition naming scheme for above example to match for clarity sake

Comments

  • shodownshodown Member Posts: 2,271
    In the case you have shown above. The 1st Partition in the CSS will win and the other guy/gal is left out in the no call land.
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  • ande0255ande0255 Banned Posts: 1,178
    So if I added the following partition to that CSS:

    -Partition_C
    --1XX1

    Then Partition A still wins because they are all even matches, so it selects the top partition in the list with the matching patterns? And the fact that 10XX begins with two digits has no extra pull in the longest match search, because they all contain two variables and are therefore all completely even matches?

    Just want to really solidify and confirm that 100% before I revise my notes to reflect that, I think the haze of studying got the best of me towards the end of that video.

    Thanks again for any responses!;
  • shodownshodown Member Posts: 2,271
    its kinda late, so I maybe off.

    Usually you don't want overlapping patterns in your dial plan even if they are in different partitions for an enterprise. This will just cause a pain for most of the users and you will have to have site codes and things of that nature.

    Usually the only time you will have an overlapping dial plan is if you are using a call manager in a ISP environment where each customer can be broken out into there own different extensions cause the dial plan won't over lap with each company on your system.
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  • bobfromfplbobfromfpl Member Posts: 104
    Hi Ande,

    Did you ever find the answer to this?
  • ande0255ande0255 Banned Posts: 1,178
    Not really but I kind of moved onto different topics.

    My question was if you look at the follow CSS/Partition mapping:

    CSS_Test_A
    -Partition_A
    --1X0X
    -Partition_B
    --10XX
    -Partition_C
    --1XX1

    Which Partition would be used to forward a call to DN 1001?

    I'm wondering if Partition B is the best match because it has two consecutive static numbers, or if they are all considered a longest match because they all include 2 variables digits for the DN (so the Partition A would then be used)?

    If that exact question were on an exam, what would be the correct answer, is what I was looking for :)
  • bobfromfplbobfromfpl Member Posts: 104
    Yeah it would use the first partition in the CSS. However if you had the same route patterns under a single partition I believe your original hunch would be correct, that it would use pattern 10XX since it is a longer match.
  • ande0255ande0255 Banned Posts: 1,178
    Cool, thanks for the clarification, I figured I'd just revisit that in the OCG as the explanation of that was a bit confusing in the INE video explaining Partitions / CSS.

    Thanks again!
  • JollycorkJollycork Member Posts: 149
    In the work world, businesses usually divide up the extension numbers by either location or department and sometimes uses both. I know some government agencies also use a combination of location and department for allocating extension numbers, which makes partitions and CSSs a lot easier to work with. No overlapping extensions. Just a large block of them for each department and/or location.

    The one thing that almost all brick and mortar fairly large businesses have are lobby phones and no receptionists. Creating a partition and CSS for lobby phones that only can call one department is fairly routine.
  • ccnpninjaccnpninja Senior Member EuropeMember Posts: 1,010 ■■■□□□□□□□
    As mentioned by Shodown, the first partition is selected because it's the highest on the list of matches.
    I'm wondering if Partition B is the best match because it has two consecutive static numbers
    This is true in CUCME environment, where the longest match algorithm is applied when matching dial peers, i.e. if you have a pattern with the longest consecutive explicit digits, it will win.
    I don't think CUCM implements the longest match algorithm. Besides, in the real world, I still have not encountered a case where patterns are like 1X0X.
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  • cisco_nerdcisco_nerd Member Posts: 198
    ccnpninja wrote: »
    As mentioned by Shodown, the first partition is selected because it's the highest on the list of matches.

    This is true in CUCME environment, where the longest match algorithm is applied when matching dial peers, i.e. if you have a pattern with the longest consecutive explicit digits, it will win.
    I don't think CUCM implements the longest match algorithm. Besides, in the real world, I still have not encountered a case where patterns are like 1X0X.

    longest match is still a consideration in CUCM dial-plan configuration, its just what partition that route pattern sits in and who has the right CSS to call that pattern.

    The order or partitions within a CSS matter, like most things with Cisco. So the first partition will be searched first - if there is a match then the call processing engine will stop searching and pass the digits on through that matched route pattern - regardless if there is a more specific route pattern in the next partition or 5 down the list. It is an ordered process and you must consider this order when designing your calling privileges within the enterprise.
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