Getting Started and installing Windows Server 2012

JubbsJubbs Registered Users Posts: 4 ■□□□□□□□□□
Hi guys. I got my A+ a year or so ago and I am trying to get a cert that will get my foot in the door and get my first actual IT job (not a help desk or customer service role). These past few days I have been bouncing all over for which cert to take. Originally it was CCNA vs MCSE but I decided that I would rather do server admin stuff rather than networking and a lot of people recommended it more. Then it became MCSE vs RHCE but again I decided MCSE would be a better START, but I plan to get both anyways. So that is my intro.

I am seeing so many resources for MCSE training and it is starting to become confusing. Some people recommend Book A over Book B, some people say screw books go through all this free training at Website A or Website B. So I guess I just need help at choosing the best guide. I had heard good things about CBT Nuggets and I want watch those too, but do I need a book? Also I do not (in my two seconds of searching) see any 410 practice exams on this forum's resources.

I also have a copy of of Server 2012, being a student I found a way to get it for free but it might just be a trial so whatever. Anyways, I can't decided if should use a VBox/VMware, or install it to a spare computer. My personal computer is a powerful gaming rig, but my spare computer is an older AMD dual core with 2gb of DDR2 Ram box. When I read up installing it virtually it says something about needing the vbox/vmware to install more virtual OS's and I get confused.


Sorry for all the questions I am just excited to get started.

Comments

  • Asif DaslAsif Dasl Member Posts: 2,116 ■■■■■■■■□□
    OK so you don't have an IT job at the moment, getting an MCSE without experience is not going to help you. You need to build the fundamentals starting with a client OS. Either Windows 7 or Windows 8.1, the 8.1 books are not out until February & March so don't go out and buy them just yet if you go that route. 50% of computers run Windows 7, something for you to consider in your choice. Only 15% Windows 8.

    I think it's better to start off with MCSA:Windows 7 or MCSA:Windows 8.1 and with a job gain experience. Bypassing help-desk is very hard to do because it's there were you prove your potential for handling harder and more responsible tasks. Nobody is going to hire you for a system admin job with no experience and just a MCSE. That used to happen in the past but not any longer.

    I recommend you get Safari Books Online for your books, either CBT Nuggets and/or Pluralsight for your training, and SelfTestSoftware for your practice exams. Look for videos on YouTube for seting up Windows on VirtualBox or VMware Workstation. Pluralsight has some VMware workstation videos which might be helpful. Get your evaluation ISOs from the TechNet Evaluation Center.

    Forget about MCSE or RHCE for the moment, and deal with the present situation of getting your first IT job and leave MCSE/RHCE as a goal for next year at the very least IMO. I hope I don't come across as too harsh but I don't want you to be naive about the situation either. Plenty of people want to enter IT and earn big money. You will need to use experience and certifications along your journey to climb the IT ladder.

    HTH.
  • nestechnestech Member Posts: 74 ■■■□□□□□□□
    Jubbs wrote: »
    Hi guys. I got my A+ a year or so ago and I am trying to get a cert that will get my foot in the door and get my first actual IT job (not a help desk or customer service role). These past few days I have been bouncing all over for which cert to take. Originally it was CCNA vs MCSE but I decided that I would rather do server admin stuff rather than networking and a lot of people recommended it more. Then it became MCSE vs RHCE but again I decided MCSE would be a better START, but I plan to get both anyways. So that is my intro.

    I am seeing so many resources for MCSE training and it is starting to become confusing. Some people recommend Book A over Book B, some people say screw books go through all this free training at Website A or Website B. So I guess I just need help at choosing the best guide. I had heard good things about CBT Nuggets and I want watch those too, but do I need a book? Also I do not (in my two seconds of searching) see any 410 practice exams on this forum's resources.

    I also have a copy of of Server 2012, being a student I found a way to get it for free but it might just be a trial so whatever. Anyways, I can't decided if should use a VBox/VMware, or install it to a spare computer. My personal computer is a powerful gaming rig, but my spare computer is an older AMD dual core with 2gb of DDR2 Ram box. When I read up installing it virtually it says something about needing the vbox/vmware to install more virtual OS's and I get confused.


    Sorry for all the questions I am just excited to get started.

    You are trying to reach a place that took some of us years to reach. We all had to start somewhere. I would not trust anyone with my server's if you don't have experience working on workstation/desktop.

    I say get your security + and mcsa

    I would use the virtual machine. You can install both software and see which one you like the best.
  • Theegg911Theegg911 Member Posts: 124
    Another good basic cert is Network+. Professor Messer has free training videos on this exam as well as Windows 7 and Security+: Professor Messer, CompTIA A+, Network+, Security+, Linux, Microsoft Certification Training

    That will give you basic fundamentals to do alot of simple tasks as a helpdesk member. You need to start at the Helpdesk level before you can get in your foot in as a Server Admin.

    MCSA would help with the Server Admin part when the time comes.

    Without experience, I would suggest you NOT get the MCSE, MCSA, or even CCNA until you have 1-2 yrs of experience. This will actually hurt you for interviews if you try to get one. Because they will ask questions on real life problems for what those exams cover. And if you cant answer those correctly, you will get tossed aside during the hiring process and it can even ruin any chances in the future with that company because they will assume you braindumped or something to get those certs without real life experience.

    I know you are eager to get in and kick butt but patience is key in the IT field. You gotta build a foundation for yourself, not just with certs, but with experience as well.

    Say you did get MCSE, most jobs will not even look at you unless you have 3+ yrs of experience. So it's best to build up from your A+.

    I personally say the route you should go is: Your A+ > Network+ > Security+ > Windows 7; 70-680 > Windows 7; 70-685 > Then the Server 2012 MCSA exams.

    The reason for the cert path is the Net+ will renew your A+. The Security+ will renew the Net+. and after you take those 3, it will give you some better understanding to some terms on the MS Exams.
    Next Goal: Office 365 70-346 (Scheduled for 9/25)
  • MSSoftieMSSoftie Security+, ITIL v3 Foundations, MCSE Cloud Platform Infrastructure Charlotte NC areaMember Posts: 190 ■■■□□□□□□□
    Just to echo those above. DO NOT GET MCSE without real world experience or at least a current job. I am not saying that it is impossible but you will make yourself look like a fraud in my opinion. You can safely go for the desktop certifications (either Windows 7 or icon_cool.gif. I would suggest Network+ and Security+ are also good entry level certs that will make you stand out. CCNA is even better but definitely more work and not as immediately useful in my opinion. Normally, people hired to actually work directly on CISCO equipment have the higher level certs that you are likely not ready for.

    I want to encourage your enthusiasm but set some realistic goals. Helpdesks and the like are a fine place to start. I will tell you one other thing that most people will NOT tell you but I have found it to be true. After twelve to 18 months (maybe 2 years at the longest) working on a helpdesk, look for a new job with a new company. It may be possible to get a promotion in your current (when you have one) employer. However, your promotion will often be slower and your raises are usually smaller. Company's generally will only increase your salary by a small percentage at a time. Finding work in a new company makes it much easier it increase your position and salary much faster.

    Personally, I worked a call center job for one year doing phone support. The next year I moved into a support desk role working on desktops and laptops (about 75% increase in salary. Two years later I was working as a server admin (about a 33% increase in salary). Two and a half years later I was in a team leadership role at a new company (30% increase in salary). Two years later I was back to a technical role with another increase (only about 15% this time but still significant).

    I do not consider myself the smartest guy in the room but I do work hard. At each company I received above average reviews but only about 4% pay increase each year that I stayed (most people received about 2%). One company would not give me a promotion to the position I was unofficially working for over a year because "it was too big an increase in salary at one time without VP approval according to policy". It has become my personal policy that after 2 to 3 years in any position, I need to either move up or move out.
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