Studying Help

D_RabbitD_Rabbit Junior MemberRegistered Users Posts: 1 ■□□□□□□□□□
Hello All,

I wanted to ask all of you on the methods you use to study for your respective certifications, and how you retain information.

1) When you buy a study guide book (let's use Todd Lammle as an example), do you buy a notebook to write down notes?
2) How long (months, years?) do you take to study for an exam before getting ready to register for it?
3) What are your favorite resources to use?

Comments

  • CerebroCerebro Senior Member Member Posts: 108
    Buy some notebooks, I use the type that I used to use in school. Make notes and notes! even if you dont look at them again it increases my knowledge by at least 50%.
    2014 goals: ICND2[]

  • BokehBokeh Senior Member Member Posts: 1,636 ■■■■■■■□□□
    Some prefer written, some prefer typed notes. Others create "notebooks" in programs such as One Note, Growly Note (Mac). Others just do flash cards and write hundreds of them.

    Some prefer their study guides in electronic format instead of DTB (dead tree books). Some use both!

    What really matters, is what works best for YOU.

    As far as resources go, whatever cert you are working towards, that company's website is best for starters. TechExams, WikiPedia, Google for topics you are having difficulty with. Look for Podcasts, training sites such as Professor Messer, etc.
  • M3CodyM3Cody Junior Member Member Posts: 19 ■□□□□□□□□□
    D_Rabbit wrote: »
    Hello All,

    I wanted to ask all of you on the methods you use to study for your respective certifications, and how you retain information.

    1) When you buy a study guide book (let's use Todd Lammle as an example), do you buy a notebook to write down notes?
    2) How long (months, years?) do you take to study for an exam before getting ready to register for it?
    3) What are your favorite resources to use?


    1.Yes, Take notes, and review them later.
    2. That depends on the exam. I study until I pass all of the practice exams I take with 100%. (Take a few different ones) If you have difficulty with something (like memorizing port numbers or what not) make flash cards.
    3.Google
  • rhtrht Member Member Posts: 92 ■■□□□□□□□□
    1. Yes it helps me to memorize and review before the exam. Its a good idea.
    2. Depends on your motivation! it took me 4 months to pass A+ and only 1 month for Network+. Anything is possible if you can manage your time.
    3. Proffesor Messor videos are a MUST period. You also need a book either EXAM CRAM or choose Mike Meyers if you are new to networking and need to understand concepts. I used EXAM CRAM then i had to buy Mike Meyers book.

    I hope you have good imagination because its important that you understand and visualize the concepts to pass the exam. This is where Proffesor Messor videos and drawing diagrams help alot. There is alot of theory involved which means you need to memorize some stuff so maybe flash cards can help.

    Good Luck!
  • SnackyJSnackyJ Junior Member Member Posts: 16 ■□□□□□□□□□
    For the A+, I bought the book a year ago and read it and took a few notes, but it wasn't until last month where I really tried to study.

    1. I take notes from the Exam Cram (or any other book) where it says to remember certain objectives. I write things I have to memorize (for example) the OSI model to commit it to memory. So yes, I do write down things, but primarily only things that are, for the lack of a better term rote.

    2. For the A+ I have the 500+ hours of experience it suggests, and in addition I've read/watched videos/took notes and took practice test for probably around 100 hours. It may be overkill, but I want to be certain I will pass. So far I'm feeling pretty confident (knocks on wood).

    For the N+ I plan on studying at least that much. I only have the basic understandings of networks. I've started studying a bit, and the hardest part looks like subnetting so far, and the rest memorization. I'm more excited to start studying for N+ than I was for A+ because I'm interested in networking more, so I may spend less time studying if I "get it" sooner.

    3. I use books like Exam Cram for A+, but also Mike Meyers for N+ and of course professormesser.com. Those videos are amazing and help you if you'd rather learn visually and aurally. I also Google things I'm interested in to get a different, more in-depth perspective. For example, I wanted to know the difference and why behind multi-mode and single-mode fiber cable. So I looked it up on YouTube and got some good info. Again it helps to be interested in what you're studying.

    Also, practice tests, at least from Pearson's generator are excellent because they give an explanation for the correct answer. I'm planning on buying that as well for the N+.

    Lastly hands-on/lab simulators/virtual machines are also vital, as you can get an obvious tangible feel for the material. Actually seeing those connections being made just adds another dimension to learning.
  • AeternaAeterna Junior Member Member Posts: 10 ■□□□□□□□□□
    All depends on motivation and skill level. I've been working in IT/networking for almost 2 years so I only gave myself 2 weeks for the N+ test. I'm taking it next week, but I've already read Mike Meyers + Exam Cram book. Passing all the practice tests so far, and I'm ready... I have spent probably 90% of my free time studying. I knew a lot thanks to my job experience though. I'd say if you had no prior experience you would want to give yourself around 1 month to study. I haven't looked into professor messor, but it would probably be more helpful for someone like you not working in the field!
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