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I need to know the truth.

hell911hell911 Member Posts: 83 ■■■□□□□□□□
i need to know if the subjects being taught in this program is sufficient for me to get a good start in workfield?

3404 Computer Systems Technician

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    ratbuddyratbuddy Member Posts: 665
    I didn't research the school itself at all, but at a glance, it looks perfectly fine, and not too expensive.
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    lsud00dlsud00d Member Posts: 1,571
    It looks well-rounded (at a very high level overview) but I think you'd be better off (both financially and overall time investment) self-studying for some entry-level certs.
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    hell911hell911 Member Posts: 83 ■■■□□□□□□□
    thanks for the replies.

    and what about this one..

    3405 Computer Systems Technology

    it has subjects like data center, network management, etc. (but it's a 3 year program)

    any idea from these 2, which one is better in terms of knowledge, current demands, time consumed, etc.?
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    xenodamusxenodamus Member Posts: 758
    I completed a similar 2-year program at a community college. Your coursework will provide a nice overview of a variety of technologies - a mile wide and inch deep you could say. You won't necessarily be qualified to DO much upon completion, though. You'll need to find a low level technical position where they'll give you a chance to prove yourself. You'll face that challenge whether you get a degree or not, the degree just gives you an edge over another candidate without.

    Honestly, what will kill your chances at an interview faster than lack of experience is poor writing skills. Your single sentence post has no capitalization in addition to grammatical errors. I know this is just a forum, but would I throw out a resume that had errors like that. No offense...just constructive criticism.
    CISSP | CCNA:R&S/Security | MCSA 2003 | A+ S+ | VCP6-DTM | CCA-V CCP-V
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    hell911hell911 Member Posts: 83 ■■■□□□□□□□
    @xenodamus

    I admit, I am ignoring my writing skills here in forums.

    Back to the question, so that 2 year diploma program in the first post will just give me an introduction to networking with an entry level position of network support? Providing support, that's it?

    And for the job growth, How many years will it take to go into a managerial or executive position from an entry level position? Let's say an employee is doing good in his/her work.
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    xenodamusxenodamus Member Posts: 758
    Fair enough...just making sure icon_wink.gif

    Yes, finishing a degree or program without any experience will land you an entry level position. That's the normal path in IT, though. You have to start somewhere. Once you have some experience and a few certifications you can start applying for higher level positions. I would pick up a few certifications while doing coursework if I were you. If you're interested in networking, CCENT/CCNA would set you apart from the crowd.

    Regarding advancement, everyone seems to have a different timeline. I was managing a team of 13 desktop/helpdesk analysts by the time I was 26. I had almost 10 years of desktop support experience by that point, though. I can't really comment on executive positions, but most folks I know that hold one are in the 40+ age group with an MBA and other acronyms after their name.
    CISSP | CCNA:R&S/Security | MCSA 2003 | A+ S+ | VCP6-DTM | CCA-V CCP-V
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    XyroXyro Member Posts: 623
    xenodamus wrote: »
    Once you have some experience and a few certifications you can start applying for higher level positions.

    I cannot even get another entry-level position with this.

    OP, if you were in the US I would say not to waste your time with (something that appears to be the equivalent of) an Associate's degree here and instead aim for something higher such as a Bachelor's degree. It may all vary though since you are in Canada. Go for the highest degree you can get if you are going to invest the time with formal schooling or cert up as much as possible... or do both!
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    nelnel Member Posts: 2,859 ■□□□□□□□□□
    hell911 wrote: »
    i need to know the truth

    YOU CANT HANDLE THE TRUTH!!!!!!

    lols....sorry, i couldnt help myself....
    Xbox Live: Bring It On

    Bsc (hons) Network Computing - 1st Class
    WIP: Msc advanced networking
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    hell911hell911 Member Posts: 83 ■■■□□□□□□□
    xenodamus wrote: »
    Fair enough...just making sure

    Yes, finishing a degree or program without any experience will land you an entry level position. That's the normal path in IT, though. You have to start somewhere. Once you have some experience and a few certifications you can start applying for higher level positions. I would pick up a few certifications while doing coursework if I were you. If you're interested in networking, CCENT/CCNA would set you apart from the crowd.

    Regarding advancement, everyone seems to have a different timeline. I was managing a team of 13 desktop/helpdesk analysts by the time I was 26. I had almost 10 years of desktop support experience by that point, though. I can't really comment on executive positions, but most folks I know that hold one are in the 40+ age group with an MBA and other acronyms after their name.

    Since I am in networking, do I need to get certifications like Windows 7, Windows Server 2008, etc.? Or only the networking certifications?

    I am talking about the current situation, since I don't have any experience.
    Xyro wrote: »
    I cannot even get another entry-level position with this.

    OP, if you were in the US I would say not to waste your time with (something that appears to be the equivalent of) an Associate's degree here and instead aim for something higher such as a Bachelor's degree. It may all vary though since you are in Canada. Go for the highest degree you can get if you are going to invest the time with formal schooling or cert up as much as possible... or do both!

    What about this program, this is 3 years instead of 2, and it has Coop.

    3415 Computer Systems Technology
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    TomkoTechTomkoTech Member Posts: 438
    No one is going to be able to tell you what program at some no name school is going to best for you to get your feet wet and advance. People learn differently, and schools teach differently. You could just as easily self-study for your entry level certifications and in a lot less time. For 1 person self-study and a CCNA could lead to an excellent job where they can gain experience and knowledge to pass their CCNP and then be in managerial role in under 3-4 years. While another could spend 5 years working on a bachelors at a well known university get out and struggle for a year to find an entry level job before being stuck their for 4-5 years without advancement.

    Based on your posts I am going to guess that you have very little to zero experience. ANY program you take seriously and put an effort into will garner you the knowledge you want. There is no "best fit". However the coop program gains you real world experience that you can put on a resume, so it would probably be your best bet. How that would transition into promotions after the fact is 100% on you.
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    XyroXyro Member Posts: 623
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    BloogenBloogen Member Posts: 180 ■■■□□□□□□□
    I don't have too much time to go into details but since it hits close to home I want to at least comment.

    I live in the GTA and I actually completed about a year in that 3 year program you linked to. I never graduated. I don't like to complain to much but lets just say it was not what I was hoping for.

    I am interested to know how old you are and if you have ever attempted, even if you dropped out of any other program before.

    My quick commentary on your question is to realize that your results come from how ambitious you are and your character. If you have both of these going for you, it almost doesn't matter what school or what program or if you ever get a degree. What matters is if you're the type of person which makes it work because you put the work in on yourself, not because of the school curriculum.

    I chose to leave this program and made it my goal to get as much experience, studying, reading and certifications as I could on my own. I would never change the route I chose but realize this does not work for everyone.

    On the other hand, for someone who won't take this initiate, (at least at this point in their life) then you might as well be earning a degree in the mean time instead of working a dead end job.
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    BloogenBloogen Member Posts: 180 ■■■□□□□□□□
    I want to add something.

    Something I really believe in is modelling. You probably lack what I lacked at that point in my life, something to emulate. I didn't even know what success looked like or how to get there.

    You need to find people to emulate and ideally people who can help mentor you. This could be a boss, a coworker, people on a message board. The key is to find the people who have been there and are already getting and surpassing the results you are after. This is critical or you may find yourself 3 years down the line of a school program still asking the same question you are today.
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    xenodamusxenodamus Member Posts: 758
    The 3 year program appears to have more content and they place you in a job for the co-op portion - both pluses for sure. Out of the 2, I'd go with this one if you have the time and money. If you really want to plan for a path into management down the road a 4 year degree is the way to go, though. You might make it to low levels of supervision without one, but any higher level positions will want a B.A./B.S. or higher.

    Regarding certification, it's all about how you want to target your job search. If you want to shoot for a purely networking position in a NOC/NOSC, then stick with network related certifications. This will limit the number of jobs in your search, though. There are a lot of positions out there that include a lot of networking responsibilities, but also expect you to admin systems/servers of various kinds. Those jobs are much more plentiful (especially in small environments) because employers love to spread you thin and kill 2 birds with one stone.

    I work with routers and switches regularly, but as my certifications show...that's not all I do. I'm OK with that at this point in my career, but down the road I plan to specialize and move into a single area. I got the job I have because I could do it all, though.
    CISSP | CCNA:R&S/Security | MCSA 2003 | A+ S+ | VCP6-DTM | CCA-V CCP-V
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    xenodamusxenodamus Member Posts: 758
    One more reply to break my "666" post count icon_lol.gif....also to agree with Bloogen above. I owe much of my success to the motivation and mentoring I've gotten from more experienced pros, both on this forum and IRL. So stick around, keep asking questions, and never stop learning.
    CISSP | CCNA:R&S/Security | MCSA 2003 | A+ S+ | VCP6-DTM | CCA-V CCP-V
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    hell911hell911 Member Posts: 83 ■■■□□□□□□□
    I know that the 3 year program has more content and it is a coop program, the only downside is it takes 3 years to complete. I don't have time right now, money is manageable though.

    Since you said that to get into management positions, I need to get into 4 year bachelor's program, so don't you think that the 3 year and 2 year program's in this topic are almost the same scale (excluding coop)? Those subjects listed in semester 5 and 6 in the 3 year program, maybe I can self study them?

    I have bachelor's degree in information systems, maybe it can help when I started looking for high positions, but not entirely sure. icon_sad.gif
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    XyroXyro Member Posts: 623
    You already have a bachelor's degree?? Why are you not already in the workfield in this case???
    hell911 wrote: »
    i need to know if the subjects being taught in this program is sufficient for me to get a good start in workfield?
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    lsud00dlsud00d Member Posts: 1,571
    Echoing what @Xyro said.

    I'd say the majority of people in IT either have an unrelated degree or don't have a degree at all...you have a semi-related degree, so why are you wasting more time in school? You should be able to get an entry level position now.
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    hell911hell911 Member Posts: 83 ■■■□□□□□□□
    I came to Canada under study permit. Not sure if I can get part time IT related job with the help of my degree?
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    lsud00dlsud00d Member Posts: 1,571
    What country is your bachelor's issued from? Do some research to see how Canada honors varying degree programs from other countries to address your question.
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    hell911hell911 Member Posts: 83 ■■■□□□□□□□
    My degree is from De La Salle - College of Saint Benilde in Philippines
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