What certs will benefit me the most in an entry level job?

BrienBrien Registered Users Posts: 4 ■□□□□□□□□□
I could go and pass any of the following tests after self study for a week if I wanted to.

(A+, Net+, Security+, Linux+)

I'm currently self studying for CCNA while getting my Bachelor's.

I'm looking into finding a part time job that will also contribute to experience, but that seems pretty hard.

I know that the certs above are nice to have, but are they worth the $300 I'd need to drop on them?

Comments

  • aderonaderon CISSP, CCNA:S, CCNA:R&S, AWS:CSA Assoc, Sec+, Lin+, A+, Net+, Proj+ Member Posts: 404 ■■■■□□□□□□
    A+ seems to be the de facto standard for a lot of help desk and tier I tech support positions in my area. I originally got my Net+ followed by the Sec+, but it wasn't until my A+ that I started getting more call backs. It seems to be moreso about what registers with the HR guy/gal than the reality of which is the more difficult/useful cert.

    CCNA is definitely going to be the most useful though if you want to leave the help desk. Good luck on everything mate.
    2019 Certification/Degree Goals: AWS CSA Renewal (In Progress), M.S. Cybersecurity (In Progress), CCNA R&S Renewal (Not Started)
  • BrienBrien Registered Users Posts: 4 ■□□□□□□□□□
    aderon wrote: »
    A+ seems to be the de facto standard for a lot of help desk and tier I tech support positions in my area. I originally got my Net+ followed by the Sec+, but it wasn't until my A+ that I started getting more call backs. It seems to be moreso about what registers with the HR guy/gal than the reality of which is the more difficult/useful cert.

    CCNA is definitely going to be the most useful though if you want to leave the help desk. Good luck on everything mate.

    A+ seems kind of redundant in nature after diving into CCNA. It seems like a pointless cert unless you're starting off in IT with little to no knowledge of computers.

    If it's what HR wants to see though, I should probably pick it up.

    At a minimum, I will come out of school with a Bachelor's and a CCNA. I might go CCNP but chances are I won't list my CCNP so I don't like a paper CCNP.

    Any opinions on the other Cisco certs like Voice, or Security?
  • srabieesrabiee Member Posts: 1,231 ■■■■■■■□□□
    I wouldn't lump the Linux+ into the same category. If you want to go the route of Linux administration, that's a serious cert. Passing the Linux+ will net you 4 other Linux certs. So this cert is effectively "5-in-1." Details can be read here:

    CompTIA Linux+ and LPI LPIC-1 | Greg Porter's Blog
    WGU Progress: Master of Science - Information Technology Management (Start Date: February 1, 2015)
    Completed: LYT2, TFT2, JIT2, MCT2, LZT2, SJT2 (17 CU's)
    Required: FXT2, MAT2, MBT2, C391, C392 (13 CU's)

    Bachelor of Science - Information Technology Network Design & Management (WGU - Completed August 2014)
  • lsud00dlsud00d Member Posts: 1,571
    Echoing what @srabiee touched on, the L+ is nowhere near comparable to the A+/N+/S+. True, it is below the RHCSA, but the test formats are vastly different and the L+ is still no cakewalk.

    That said, in most markets you will get the best mileage with the S+, especially combined with the CCNA and a Bachelor's degree.
  • DoyenDoyen Member Posts: 397
    Brien wrote: »

    At a minimum, I will come out of school with a Bachelor's and a CCNA. I might go CCNP but chances are I won't list my CCNP so I don't like a paper CCNP.

    Any opinions on the other Cisco certs like Voice, or Security?

    I'm also doing my Bachelor's while studying for the CCNA. I am actually going for a 3rd attempt on that exam this Friday. I was considering the same path as you, however, CCNP is a lot more knowledge to ingest. Regardless of how much you lab it, after you achieve attaining CCNP, it will still look like a "paper CCNP" without the work experience to back it up. As a friend pointed out to me, what is the point of having a certification if you are not going to show or list it?

    I would recommend that you go for CCNA Security, which is an easier study transition after routering & switching. Actually, since the first two chapters of the CCNA Security book seems to be "Security+", you might as well study for that cert and then go for CCNA Security after Security+. Voice seems to be in demand in my area, so it probably wouldn't hurt to study that as well. Anyway, what I am trying to drive at is that after you gain a job in the networking field, then it would be best to study for CCNP level of studies since you have more "real world" experience to add to that CCNP credential.
    Goals for 2016: [] VCP 5.5: ICM (recertifying) , [ ] VMware VCA-NV, [ ] 640-911 DCICN, [ ] 640-916 DCICT, [ ] CCNA: Data Center, [ ] CISSP (Associate), [ ] 300-101 ROUTE, [ ] 300-115 SWITCH, [ ] 300-135 TSHOOT, [ ] CCNP: Route & Switch, [ ] CEHv8, [ ] LX0-103, [ ] LX0-104
    Future Goals: WGU MSISA or Capital Technology Univerisity MSCIS Degree Program
    Click here to connect with me on LinkedIn! Just mention your are from Techexams.net.
  • newlife23newlife23 Member Posts: 6 ■□□□□□□□□□
    so is it a good idea to skip the A+,net+ and just go get the security+? i'm very well proficient in network+ and can pass the exam but I dont want to spend the money in the cert if it is not going to guarantee a job quickly. I have no experience in working in it and do not have a college degree thanks in advance
  • no!all!no!all! Member Posts: 245 ■■■□□□□□□□
    I feel like the CompTIA trio would be a good starting point for entry level, but a CCNA without any real world experiene might be a little tough. If you can knock out the A+ N+ S+ and L+ in a week of self study, I'd so go for it if you've got the money to throw down.
    A+, N+, S+, CCNA:RS, CCNA:Sec

    "In high society TCP is more welcome than UDP. At least it knows a proper handshake" - Ben Franklin

    2019 Goals: CCNP:RS & relocate to St. Pete, FL!
  • newlife23newlife23 Member Posts: 6 ■□□□□□□□□□
    so your saying having all those certs is essential? like netowrk+ and security+ is better then just having sec+ and having all the knowledge of network+ but not actually going to take the test?, my point is i dont want to have certs dont have no value I would go and study and know everything I need but to actually take the cert I want to know it would be worth it
  • GLaDOS11GLaDOS11 Member Posts: 34 ■■□□□□□□□□
    I think that that the CompTIA Trio is never a bad thing to do, but their value will depreciate over time as you move into more senior roles. I've found that people who say that they're not worth it are usually applying for much more advanced jobs...way past the material that is covered on the exam. For entry level, they're great. They're very recognizable to nearly every HR department and most entry level jobs will require at least one of them.


    Of course you can get a job without any of the CompTIA exams but, in my opinion, if you can knock them all out in a week each, you should do it. At the very least, it's certainly not going to CLOSE any doors for you. Having a bachelors, CCNA, A+, Net+ and Sec+ is better than just a bachelors and a CCNA.
  • tstrip007tstrip007 Member Posts: 306 ■■■■□□□□□□
    "I dont want to spend the money in the cert if it is not going to guarantee a job quickly." The only cert that may guarantee a job is CCIE and its equivalents in other technologies. With that said, look on the job sites for jobs in your area and see what companies are wanting. Typically its Microsoft, A+, N+...I understand they also want experience but your going for an entry level meaning you prob. will not be responsible for running the show. If you can prove that your a quick learner and your willing to learn, I would take you and I'm sure someone else would too. Certifiying to me means, you have the knowledge and your willing to learn.
  • newlife23newlife23 Member Posts: 6 ■□□□□□□□□□
    ok thank you very much I appericiate all the inputs, I am going to take the net+ test in a week, instead having skipping it and going startt to security+
  • DoyenDoyen Member Posts: 397
    GLaDOS11 wrote: »
    I think that that the CompTIA Trio is never a bad thing to do, but their value will depreciate over time as you move into more senior roles. I've found that people who say that they're not worth it are usually applying for much more advanced jobs...way past the material that is covered on the exam. For entry level, they're great. They're very recognizable to nearly every HR department and most entry level jobs will require at least one of them.

    Of course you can get a job without any of the CompTIA exams but, in my opinion, if you can knock them all out in a week each, you should do it. At the very least, it's certainly not going to CLOSE any doors for you. Having a bachelors, CCNA, A+, Net+ and Sec+ is better than just a bachelors and a CCNA.
    no!all! wrote: »
    I feel like the CompTIA trio would be a good starting point for entry level, but a CCNA without any real world experiene might be a little tough. If you can knock out the A+ N+ S+ and L+ in a week of self study, I'd so go for it if you've got the money to throw down.

    Exactly. I agree with this statement. The "trinity" are entry level certifications. They will eventually become obsolete once you have experience in the field and move onto more professional certifications. It wouldn't hurt to get them if you haven't reach that tier in your career for it shows your employer that you are willing to learn and advance in your field.
    tstrip007 wrote: »
    Certifiying to me means, you have the knowledge and your willing to learn.

    Now that is a great quote! Certifying to me means, showing what you know to those that don't know you. Those that "don't know you" are typically prospective employers as opposed to coworkers, classmates/instructors, friends, IT group affiliations, etc. I think I'll revise mine to incorporate your ideal:

    "Certifications & degrees show your knowledge and your willingness to learn to those that do not know you."
    Goals for 2016: [] VCP 5.5: ICM (recertifying) , [ ] VMware VCA-NV, [ ] 640-911 DCICN, [ ] 640-916 DCICT, [ ] CCNA: Data Center, [ ] CISSP (Associate), [ ] 300-101 ROUTE, [ ] 300-115 SWITCH, [ ] 300-135 TSHOOT, [ ] CCNP: Route & Switch, [ ] CEHv8, [ ] LX0-103, [ ] LX0-104
    Future Goals: WGU MSISA or Capital Technology Univerisity MSCIS Degree Program
    Click here to connect with me on LinkedIn! Just mention your are from Techexams.net.
  • [Deleted User][Deleted User] Posts: 0 ■■□□□□□□□□
    I agree with GLaDOSS11! This will show that you not only went to school, but studied outside of the classroom on your own initiative! With that in mind, you can get just about any job you wish! I'm planning on doing the same thing as well. This coming summer, I'm going to knock out my CCNA! :) +1 for tstrip007's quote!!
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