Breaking into Linux positions

vanillagorilla3vanillagorilla3 MemberMember Posts: 79 ■■■□□□□□□□
Any tips on breaking into a Linux admin type position? It seems Linux jobs are looking for several years of experience. Currently, I'm wrapping up my MCSA: 2012, but want to start studying for the RHCSA. I thought about getting the Linux+, but I don't know if that would benefit me much.

I'm comfortable with the command line and have installed several different distros over the past couple of years. I've also been studying Python a little here and there. What are some main applications Linux admins use? Containerization seems to be pretty popular.

DevOps positions seem to be relatively new and still undefined, but I do know is that could be something I'm interested in.

By the way, I'm currently a Windows Sys Admin with almost 10 years experience. I do have one Red Hat server, but it never needs anything except updates.

Comments

  • UnixGuyUnixGuy Are we having fun yet? Mod Posts: 4,147 Mod
    Start learning Linux using VMs...apply for as many jobs as you can.


    Start learning and get some Red Hat certs (RHCSA)...apply for as many jobs as you can.

    Start playing with Amazon AWS...apply for as many jobs as you can.


    There is a lot of demand, so people would rather give you a chance than give a fresh grad, your sysadmin experience is valuable :)
    Goal: MBA, Jan 2021
  • JockVSJockJockVSJock Member Posts: 1,118
    Check out linuxacademy.com for more cert training (Red Hat, Puppet/Chef and AWS)

    Learn Bash and Sed/Awk
    ***Freedom of Speech, Just Watch What You Say*** Example, Beware of CompTIA Certs (Deleted From Google Cached)

    "Its easier to deceive the masses then to convince the masses that they have been deceived."
    -unknown
  • XavorXavor Member Posts: 161
    Do the RHCSA, it's marketable and sets a baseline of skills. Leverage your existing Windows talents and learn about the Linux way of core services and management. The RHCSA covers a lot of that (storage, dns, hosting web services, virtualization, firewalls, etc).

    Look at job openings in your area for skillsets, but don't get obsessive about it. Mostly you should have an understanding of package management, building servers, basic scripting (awk, sed, bash, etc), and troubleshooting.

    My jobs have mostly been the above, and figuring out what the customer needs with a focus on best practices.

    Main applications are PXE to build servers, kickstart for automating, git for revision control, and puppet/chef/ansible/salt for managing the host configurations.
  • Kinet1cKinet1c Member Posts: 604 ■■■□□□□□□□
    Another vote for linuxacademy.com, they have Linux as well as pure AWS courses, do it, you won't regret it.
    2018 Goals - Learn all the Hashicorp products

    Luck is what happens when preparation meets opportunity
  • BodanelBodanel Member Posts: 214 ■■■□□□□□□□
    Get RHCSA. It will give a nice set of skills and, most of wall, the confidence to move forward into the linux world. I think this is the best thing I got when I got my RHCSA. That confidence that lacks by not having a great experience. Also RHCSA will give you enough skills to survive in some sysadmin jobs. It will NOT make you a guru but you will be able to do some config, some debugging which will help you along the way.
  • vanillagorilla3vanillagorilla3 Member Member Posts: 79 ■■■□□□□□□□
    UnixGuy wrote: »
    Start learning Linux using VMs...apply for as many jobs as you can.


    Start learning and get some Red Hat certs (RHCSA)...apply for as many jobs as you can.

    Start playing with Amazon AWS...apply for as many jobs as you can.


    There is a lot of demand, so people would rather give you a chance than give a fresh grad, your sysadmin experience is valuable :)

    so basically...apply for as many jobs as I can lol?

    Thanks for the all the replies. I have used Linux Academy before, but I think it's time I sign up again. I haven't thought about AWS, but will definitely start looking into that. And I will definitely need to learn sed/awk alot better.

    How many of you are currently working with Linux?
  • JockVSJockJockVSJock Member Posts: 1,118
    Agreed on the only cert to start with is RHCSA. Forget about everything else, because its a waste of time.

    I work currently as a Linux Admin.
    ***Freedom of Speech, Just Watch What You Say*** Example, Beware of CompTIA Certs (Deleted From Google Cached)

    "Its easier to deceive the masses then to convince the masses that they have been deceived."
    -unknown
  • Kinet1cKinet1c Member Posts: 604 ■■■□□□□□□□
    How many of you are currently working with Linux?

    I currently work with it but not as much as I'd like to, hopefully that will change soon. Of the AWS courses, take a look at the sysops course as it should give you a broad view of the entire AWS catalogue.
    2018 Goals - Learn all the Hashicorp products

    Luck is what happens when preparation meets opportunity
  • brownwrapbrownwrap Member Posts: 549
    I currently work with Linux, Red Hat and Suse. I have worked either Unix or Linux since 1988, starting with Sun OS. I have the Solaris Cert because it was required on my last job, and the Linux+ because it is required on this job. Both the current and last positions are DOD, but I worked for many years at a NASA facility that required no certs.
  • BodanelBodanel Member Posts: 214 ■■■□□□□□□□
    I work as a linux engineer for a few years now. The advice to apply to as many jobs as you can is very good because you may get a mixed job or an sysadmin job for a company with a few servers which will allow you to polish your skills.
  • hiddenknight821hiddenknight821 Member Posts: 1,209 ■■■■■□□□□□
    Not to high-jack this thread, but would you say someone with strong software development background have easier chance breaking in the field? I've seen web developers positions asking for Linux skill, and even some full-stack developer positions are asking for ridiculous amount of things. I can see how some Linux enthusiasts may feel compelled to jump in the development roles early on in their careers.
  • jdancerjdancer Member Posts: 482 ■■■■□□□□□□
    Not to high-jack this thread, but would you say someone with strong software development background have easier chance breaking in the field? I've seen web developers positions asking for Linux skill, and even some full-stack developer positions are asking for ridiculous amount of things. I can see how some Linux enthusiasts may feel compelled to jump in the development roles early on in their careers.

    I would say yes, if the software environment is Linux-based.
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