This is my plan for getting certificates. CCNA -> Comptia Security+

MTLChrisLEEMTLChrisLEE Member Posts: 9 ■□□□□□□□□□
Hi guys,

I'm currently studying computer engineering.
Administration/Security field has been always interesting to me.

I have been thinking that it is a good idea to get certificates to get a job/internship.

Actually, my original plan was to get CompTIA Network+, then CompTIA Security+.
I did my research and I found that CCNA is more reputable than CompTIA Network+.

Due to so, I changed my plan, I am thinking to get CCNA Routing and Switching certificate. Then, CompTIASecurity+.
However, I read some comments and some people say it is not a good idea to get CCNA without experience.
So, I have no idea what to do. Please, let me know your suggestions.

I cannot say I'm an expert in networking but I know stuff.
I am studying CompTIASecurity+ and CompTIA Network+ as a hobby (I know I'm a geek, but it is fun to study).

In brief,

1. I am a computer engineering student who have been interested in administration/security
2. I am thinking to get CCNA first, then, CompTIA Security+. However, I heard that it is not a good idea to get CCNA without experience.
3. If you were me, what would you do???

Thank you and have a nice day

Comments

  • yoba222yoba222 Senior Member Member Posts: 1,127 ■■■■■■■■□□
    I'd get the Network+ first. The networking knowledge you'll gain studying that will complement and help with your CCNA studies afterwards.
    A+, Network+, CCNA, LFCS,
    Security+, eJPT, CySA+, PenTest+,
    Cisco CyberOps, GCIH, VHL,
    In progress: OSCP
  • dave330idave330i Member Posts: 2,091 ■■■■■■■■■■
    That's the cert path I took (CCNA then S+). Never had any issues.
    2018 Certification Goals: Maybe VMware Sales Cert
    "Simplify, then add lightness" -Colin Chapman
  • 7255carl7255carl Member Posts: 1,544 ■■■□□□□□□□
    Hi and welcome to the forums

    My suggestion would be Net+ > CCNA > Sec+, personally I completed Net+ first and it helped a lot with the early CCNA topics, but if you are prepared to put in the time you can make your path work

    best of luck in your studies

    Carl icon_cool.gif
    W.I.P CCNA Cyber Ops
  • MTLChrisLEEMTLChrisLEE Member Posts: 9 ■□□□□□□□□□
    Hey Yoba, is Network+ prerequisite for Security+? I personally don't find any difficulties studying CCNA right now
  • MTLChrisLEEMTLChrisLEE Member Posts: 9 ■□□□□□□□□□
    Hey Dave, did you have any difficulty to find a job? Since I don't have any experience in IT field. I am afraid to get CCNA before any experience.
  • DatabaseHeadDatabaseHead CSM, ITIL x3, Teradata Assc, MS SQL Server, Project +, Server +, A+, N+, MS Project, CAPM, RMP Member Posts: 2,541 ■■■■■■■■■□
    I think your plan is rock solid.

    Engineering degree and the CCNA is a sweet combo.

    I would dodge the N+ and just go with the CCNA to be honest. I don't believe there is a preq for security +, you most certainly can skip N+.
  • MooseboostMooseboost Senior Member Member Posts: 775 ■■■■□□□□□□
    Not having experience will be one factor that will not play in your favor in terms of employment. With that being said you are looking at a similar progression as I took. I started with the CCNA and later obtained the CompTIA certifications, though my CompTIA certifications were more driven by incentives with my employer.

    If you don't intend to work with Cisco gear, then the CCNA won't benefit you anymore than a N+ and S+ will. The CompTIA duo will provide you with a pretty solid base of networking and basic security that you can build further on if you wanted to do the CCNA after. This is the route I would recommend. Is it possible for you to do any kind of internships while you are in school? If so, that would help you would in terms of the job market when you graduate.
    2020 Certification Goals: OSCE GXPN
    Blog: https://hackfox.net
  • NetworkNewbNetworkNewb Member Posts: 3,298 ■■■■■■■■■□
    I am afraid to get CCNA before any experience.

    CCNA is still a fairly entry level networking certification and would not be weird to have before any experience. It starts off by going over the very basics. If you had the CCNP and no experience on the other hand that would seem a little odd...
  • MTLChrisLEEMTLChrisLEE Member Posts: 9 ■□□□□□□□□□
    Hey, Mooseboost,
    Thank you for the detailed answer. I am not really sure if I will work with Cisco gear.
    That's the only reason I am not sure if I should get CCNA Routing and Switching.
    Some people say working with Cisco gear is not the main factor for getting CCNA, they say learning solid base of networking IS the main key.

    I would like to know your opinion.

    Thanks again.
  • NetworkNewbNetworkNewb Member Posts: 3,298 ■■■■■■■■■□
    The way I see it

    Network+ covers networking fundamentals and theories. You'll have a good general idea of how things work, but not know how to set up or configure them. Because they aren't vendor specific they aren't going to teach you how set them up on any specific equipment.

    CCNA R&S covers those networking fundamentals but then shows you how to set them up on Cisco equipment and how networks are setup on a deeper level as well. I think learning how to actually configure a network helps tremendously with understanding how they work.

    Might be good to check jobs you are looking to go into, on job postings, and see if they asking for Net+ or CCNA to gauge which will be more beneficial for you. I personally don't see Net+ on job ads as nearly as much as CCNA.
  • MooseboostMooseboost Senior Member Member Posts: 775 ■■■■□□□□□□
    Hey, Mooseboost,
    Thank you for the detailed answer. I am not really sure if I will work with Cisco gear.
    That's the only reason I am not sure if I should get CCNA Routing and Switching.
    Some people say working with Cisco gear is not the main factor for getting CCNA, they say learning solid base of networking IS the main key.

    I would like to know your opinion.

    Thanks again.

    My opinion is that it depends on your expectation. The problem I see with a lot of people who get their CCNA is that they obtain the certification and expect an immediate position to open for them with no experience. I see it all the time, people who get a CCNA and expect their first job to above entry level because everyone knows what a CCNA is. Not saying it is a bad exam - it was actually my first networking exam and helped me move from the Help Desk at an ISP to a NOC for a MSSP. That being said, I have also met people who just got their CCNA and can tell you all about how to configure OSPF and subnet all the things but they don't understand other simple aspects of networking such as NAT, DHCP, etc. That is why I recommend both the Network+ and the CCNA.

    The CCNA will give you a base understanding of networking and some basic configuration on Cisco gear but it is not a very deep exam so I wouldn't worry about being branded as a CCNA with no experience. I would just have realistic expectations in terms of your first networking job.

    NetworkNewb has the best advice of all. We all live in different areas and what makes for a great entry candidate where I am at may not be the same where you are. I would check the local area and see what they are looking for. Heck you can even email up a few local people and see what they would look for in a new technician.
    2020 Certification Goals: OSCE GXPN
    Blog: https://hackfox.net
  • DatabaseHeadDatabaseHead CSM, ITIL x3, Teradata Assc, MS SQL Server, Project +, Server +, A+, N+, MS Project, CAPM, RMP Member Posts: 2,541 ■■■■■■■■■□
    Aforementioned are reasons why certifications can be hard to commit too. For one person it could mean getting a job paying 40% more and to another it could be completely worthless.

    No exact science to this. Some certifications are "better" than others.

    I generally subscribe to the theory less is more when it comes to certifications.
  • RemedympRemedymp Member Posts: 834 ■■■■□□□□□□
    Mooseboost wrote: »
    My opinion is that it depends on your expectation. The problem I see with a lot of people who get their CCNA is that they obtain the certification and expect an immediate position to open for them with no experience. I see it all the time, people who get a CCNA and expect their first job to above entry level because everyone knows what a CCNA is. Not saying it is a bad exam - it was actually my first networking exam and helped me move from the Help Desk at an ISP to a NOC for a MSSP. That being said, I have also met people who just got their CCNA and can tell you all about how to configure OSPF and subnet all the things but they don't understand other simple aspects of networking such as NAT, DHCP, etc. That is why I recommend both the Network+ and the CCNA.

    The CCNA will give you a base understanding of networking and some basic configuration on Cisco gear but it is not a very deep exam so I wouldn't worry about being branded as a CCNA with no experience. I would just have realistic expectations in terms of your first networking job.

    Excellent post.
  • NavyMooseCCNANavyMooseCCNA CCNA R&S, ITIL, Security+ ZZ9ZZAMember Posts: 543 ■■■■□□□□□□
    I personally would skip the Network+ and concentrate on the CCNA and then Security+.

    Good luck!!

    'My dear you are ugly, but tomorrow I shall be sober and you will still be ugly' Winston Churchil

  • RemedympRemedymp Member Posts: 834 ■■■■□□□□□□
    I am curious to know why so many people equate CCNA with infosec.icon_confused.gif:
  • MTLChrisLEEMTLChrisLEE Member Posts: 9 ■□□□□□□□□□
    Thank you!!!
    Now, I totally understand difference between 2 exams! Thank you
  • MTLChrisLEEMTLChrisLEE Member Posts: 9 ■□□□□□□□□□
    Thank you, Mooseboose.
    My dream job is to work at the government as an IT Professionals. That's why I want to study and to get certs as much as I can .
    Thank you for your advice!
  • NetworkNewbNetworkNewb Member Posts: 3,298 ■■■■■■■■■□
    Remedymp wrote: »
    I am curious to know why so many people equate CCNA with infosec.icon_confused.gif:

    The information you learn is definitely beneficial in a lot of infosec positions. Although there is definitely a good amount a positions where it would be overkill in the networking area. All depends on what exactly a person wants to do. It also shows up on a lot of job ads for infosec positions so there is that too.
  • yparkypark Senior Member Member Posts: 107 ■■■□□□□□□□
    CCNA > Net+ only if you are looking to land a network role (Net Admin, Net Engineer). I feel that Network+ covered the foundations way better than CCNA. Majority of the CCNA is learning Cisco IOS and memorizing the commands, which you will soon forget unless you work with Cisco equipment.

    Get Net+, Security+ and move on to other security certs (SANS, ISC, etc). This will provide more value and knowledge that are relevant if you are looking for an InfoSec role. Just my two cents.
    2018 Goals: [CCNA Security] [WGU BSITSEC]
  • RemedympRemedymp Member Posts: 834 ■■■■□□□□□□
    The information you learn is definitely beneficial in a lot of infosec positions. Although there is definitely a good amount a positions where it would be overkill in the networking area. All depends on what exactly a person wants to do. It also shows up on a lot of job ads for infosec positions so there is that too.


    Even when I interviewed with Cisco for Security Analyst position they did NOT ask for this and it was not applicable to infosec...
  • yoba222yoba222 Senior Member Member Posts: 1,127 ■■■■■■■■□□
    Thank you, Mooseboose.
    My dream job is to work at the government as an IT Professionals. That's why I want to study and to get certs as much as I can .
    Thank you for your advice!

    Search the Internet for "dod 8570" if you don't yet know about it. There's a chart that spells out which certs are required for different tiers of DoD positions. (i.e. IAT levels 1-3). Might want to consider aligning your cert goals with this chart. I believe Net+ and CCNA are both on there (CCNA R&S is obscure--something about Operating Systems base) but Net+ is IAT 1.
    A+, Network+, CCNA, LFCS,
    Security+, eJPT, CySA+, PenTest+,
    Cisco CyberOps, GCIH, VHL,
    In progress: OSCP
  • MooseboostMooseboost Senior Member Member Posts: 775 ■■■■□□□□□□
    Remedymp wrote: »
    Even when I interviewed with Cisco for Security Analyst position they did NOT ask for this and it was not applicable to infosec...

    This is valid for the R&S certificate, at least with my experience in Cisco so far. At least in my area R&S isn't request much in security positions but you do frequently see requests for the security track.
    2020 Certification Goals: OSCE GXPN
    Blog: https://hackfox.net
  • DatabaseHeadDatabaseHead CSM, ITIL x3, Teradata Assc, MS SQL Server, Project +, Server +, A+, N+, MS Project, CAPM, RMP Member Posts: 2,541 ■■■■■■■■■□
    OP mentions Administration/Security (Which indicates to me Administration OR Security). Maybe I am wrong. Admin to me, means network and/or system, which in some cases the CCNA would most certainly be a good certification to have. I've worked for several large corporation and to get into the networking side you had to have a minimum CCNA, while systems were more lacked a degree was usually enough. (Of course experience was favored or required).

    Security is not my expertise, but I would venture to guess security + would be a decent certifications. I recently did a review of security certificates and C|EH and CISSP dwarfed the other certifications except for a few situations. Pen tester tied to OSCP and CISSP ~50% on all pen test job reqs. And in some management positions the CISM and CISA was number 2 behind the CISSP. I did not do analysis on security +, I was getting to many false positives.
  • MTLChrisLEEMTLChrisLEE Member Posts: 9 ■□□□□□□□□□
    yoba222 wrote: »
    Search the Internet for "dod 8570" if you don't yet know about it. There's a chart that spells out which certs are required for different tiers of DoD positions. (i.e. IAT levels 1-3).

    I may sound so dumb but what does IAT stands for? Institute for Advanced Technology???
    Oh, and thank you for letting me know DoD8570
  • RemedympRemedymp Member Posts: 834 ■■■■□□□□□□
    I may sound so dumb but what does IAT stands for? Institute for Advanced Technology???
    Oh, and thank you for letting me know DoD8570

    Information Assurance Technician.
  • TechGuru80TechGuru80 Member Posts: 1,539 ■■■■■□□□□□
    Well, Cisco has stated before that people who have Network+ have a higher passing rate on the CCNA than those who don't. You will have a good grasp of the concepts and then can focus on the Cisco commands.

    I would do Network+ > Security+ > CCENT (then CCNA).

    Network+ and Security+ won't take you that long and by doing the above path you can take full advantage of the continuing education credits towards renewal. If you do the way you have said, you would miss out on the CCNA credits towards Security+...not the end of the world but you have to be strategic.
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