Which of the following should be performed in conjunction with a termination?

jimjjimjjimjjimj Posts: 17Member ■□□□□□□□□□
What answer would you give to this?
I am puzzled by trainer's answer


Which of the following should be performed in conjunction with a termination?


A. Exit interview


B. Potential limitation of computer access


C. Prior notice of termination


D. Adequate private time to say goodbye to friends and coworkers

Comments

  • stryder144stryder144 Posts: 1,508Member ■■■■■■□□□□
    I would say that we can eliminate C and D. A is a good practice. For answer B, I don't like that they put Potential in it. B is what I would do, along with A. So, long answer short, B.
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  • TechGuru80TechGuru80 Posts: 1,535Member ■■■■■□□□□□
    stryder144 wrote: »
    I would say that we can eliminate C and D. A is a good practice. For answer B, I don't like that they put Potential in it. B is what I would do, along with A. So, long answer short, B.
    No...it says in conjunction with a termination. You wouldn't remove just some of their access would you?

    You limit access at all times during employment, you wouldn't want to give a heads up of terminating somebody, and as soon as they are terminated they need to be walked out of the facility.

    The answer is A.
  • infosec123infosec123 Posts: 48Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    TechGuru80 wrote: »
    No...it says in conjunction with a termination. You wouldn't remove just some of their access would you?

    You limit access at all times during employment, you wouldn't want to give a heads up of terminating somebody, and as soon as they are terminated they need to be walked out of the facility.

    The answer is A.

    I have yet to see a person who was laid off or fired go through an exit interview, and I have seen hundreds of people laid off/fired in my career. My only thoughts to B is what if the person doesnt have any access to begin with? Either way its a bad question.
  • albinorhino187albinorhino187 Posts: 112Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    My employment was "terminated" at my previous job even though I was the one who initiated the process after submitting my two week notice. So terminated doesn't necessarily mean fired or laid off.
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  • markulousmarkulous Posts: 2,375Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    This is one of those management vs. technical questions where you need to think like a manager. The answer is A, because an Exit Interview is always needed with Termination. "Potential" limitation of access makes no sense. When they are terminated, you disable all their access, period.
  • TechGuru80TechGuru80 Posts: 1,535Member ■■■■■□□□□□
    infosec123 wrote: »
    I have yet to see a person who was laid off or fired go through an exit interview, and I have seen hundreds of people laid off/fired in my career. My only thoughts to B is what if the person doesnt have any access to begin with? Either way its a bad question.
    Exit interviews aren't done by IT or Security...they are conducted by HR. Thus if you work in InfoSec, you wouldn't have insight into the the interviews. Of course not every company does it, some use a survey, etc.

    Also, that is a great example of how you must pick the BEST answer and not necessarily what you have experienced in real life.
  • jimjjimjjimjjimj Posts: 17Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    Thanks everyone. The answer is apparently "A".
    I had picked B because I just didn't that an exit interview was all that necessary. I didn't like B either but it seemed the best one to choose.
  • jibtechjibtech Posts: 377Member ■■■■□□□□□□
    Exit interviews can be amazingly effective, even from a security perspective.

    If someone is terminated, and holds a grudge, it is much more difficult to hold that grudge while also playing normal in an exit interview. By tying participation in the exit interview to severance, it helps dissipate some of the drama.

    It also gives HR an opportunity to gauge whether the terminated employee is likely to present a threat, and advise departments accordingly. Remember, CISSP is also about physical security. You can't just think like a technician or from just a "protect the bits" mindset. The CISSP is all-encompassing.
  • laurieHlaurieH Posts: 92Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    I'm not a massive fan of the question to be honest. I agree with jibtech's justification for holding an exit interview as a holistic approach. However the freezing/limitation of the account is probably the most important thing to ensure is done at the point that the person is told that they're leaving.
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  • shoeyshoey Posts: 111Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    little late for this but figured I'd add my two cents. hope it helps. When looking at A and B I read it as:

    A. Should perform an exit interview
    B. Should limit computer access

    Both answers (as written above) would be acceptable - however since answer B includes "potential" it seems like they are trying to lead you to select A.
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  • TechGuru80TechGuru80 Posts: 1,535Member ■■■■■□□□□□
    shoey wrote: »
    little late for this but figured I'd add my two cents. hope it helps. When looking at A and B I read it as:

    A. Should perform an exit interview
    B. Should limit computer access

    Both answers (as written above) would be acceptable - however since answer B includes "potential" it seems like they are trying to lead you to select A.
    If they wanted you to pick B, they would NEVER say limit access on termination...they would say remove or revoke access because that person is no longer an employee.

    The exam at times can test your English skills and ability to read the question closely. Taking practice questions can help you get good at finding the root of the question because it's definitely very different than a lot of technical exams out there. Once you get the skill down it will make answering the questions easier assuming you know what the CBK states.
  • ITSec14ITSec14 Posts: 399Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    The answer is A.

    B is incorrect since you would revoke all access.

    C is incorrect as prior notice of termination is not required by FLSA, unless that employee is under contract or part of a union. (Outside the scope of the exam)

    D is incorrect because of obvious reasons
  • redsteelredsteel Posts: 32Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    HAHA, yes! I know this one. The answer is A. And the reason is . . . .to remind them of their non-disclosure agreement that they have signed. You can't have your trade secrets and knowledge walk out your door and over to your competitor!
  • Adamkathy23Adamkathy23 Posts: 9Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    Many a times we decide on the answer based on which 1 is "Right" among the 4 instead of which of the 3 are "Wrong".
    This question is an example of the which of the 3 category.

    My understanding of Termination is that it happens on the spot(Person to be terminated is given no prior notice), hence options C & D can be removed instantly.
    If you are a security manager and decide to terminate an employee, you would want that person to finish his/her discussion with the HR and walk out. Hence makes no sense to provide any sort of access so option B is also the incorrect one.
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