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Ever felt guilty about moving jobs?

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    SquishedSquished Member Posts: 191 ■■■□□□□□□□
    Nope. Employers rarely have loyalty to you these days so there's no reason to have loyalty to them. I'd be gone for 40% and wouldn't feel bad about it for even 10 seconds.
    [2018] - A+ 901 (PASS), A+ 902 (PASS), Project+ (PASS), Security+ (PASS), Network+(PASS), CySA, Cloud+
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    HR: “What if we train them and they leave?”
    ME: “What if we don’t train them and they stay?”
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    Moldygr33nb3anMoldygr33nb3an Member Posts: 241
    Basic85 wrote: »
    Why is it that employers don't give a the employee a 2 weeks notice but yet the employee is expected to? I never understood that. Maybe due to security reasons but still, I wouldn't feel safe there if an employer fired me.

    Business is business so when you find something else that is better and pays more than leave. A notice only as a courtesy if they treated you well.

    You don't have to, just like your employer doesn't have but generally a reputable company will give you a written notice of layoff months in advanced unless something catastrophic occurs (or you're a contractor). The difference is, your opinion of your employer is meaningless to others looking for a job. Your former place of employment's opinion on your work ethics, is however, taken relatively serious when applying for another company.
    Current: OSCP

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    Basic85Basic85 Member Posts: 189 ■■■□□□□□□□
    You don't have to, just like your employer doesn't have but generally a reputable company will give you a written notice of layoff months in advanced unless something catastrophic occurs (or you're a contractor). The difference is, your opinion of your employer is meaningless to others looking for a job. Your former place of employment's opinion on your work ethics, is however, taken relatively serious when applying for another company.

    Most companies will only confirm dates of employment, title, and pay with your permission. If it's a personal reference than that is something different. In fact, the last company I worked at didn't even check my references and I knew this because they hired me so fast that they wouldn't had time. Most companies fear lawsuits so they stay far away from that as much as possible by just sticking to the minimum on what they can confirm/say.

    You're saying an employee's opinion is meaning less well I disagree, you see there are sites like GlassDoor that has employee's opinions/reviews and I do took those into consideration when looking for a job. Of course there are angry ex-employees writing reviews but there are also fake reviews by the companies themselves to promote there own.
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    volfkhatvolfkhat Member Posts: 1,061 ■■■■■■■■□□
    yes until I leave the building then it's all good.

    Bwahahahahaha

    :D
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    Flyslinger2Flyslinger2 Member Posts: 13 ■□□□□□□□□□
    1. Don't love your company because your company doesn't love you.
    2. Most decent raises come when you move from one company to another. Internal raises are usually mediocre.
    3. If you are in security be prepared to NOT spend another minute with the company after they receive your notice. It is a very common practice to escort IT personell out the minute they turn their notice in along with immediate account close outs and benefit cancelling.
    4. Negotiate with the new company an early start if #3 occurs.
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    TechGromitTechGromit Member Posts: 2,156 ■■■■■■■■■□
    Welly_59 wrote: »
    So, recent CCNP pass paid for by employer

    What exactly do you mean recent CCNP pass was paid for by your employer? Did they just reimburse you for the certification exam costs? Or did they foot the bill for a boot camp? If they just paid for the exams, I really wouldn't feel bad at all, it peanuts, but if they dropped a significant amount of $ training you, then yes I'd feel bad. I'd at least give them a chance to up your salary, maybe not to the 40% level, but even it they gave you a 25% raise, I'd seriously consider staying for a couple more years.
    Still searching for the corner in a round room.
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    Welly_59Welly_59 Member Posts: 431
    I mean exam reimbursement. All learning was self study in my own time
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    TechGromitTechGromit Member Posts: 2,156 ■■■■■■■■■□
    Welly_59 wrote: »
    I mean exam reimbursement. All learning was self study in my own time

    Than no, I wouldn't feel bad at all, if they dropped 6k plus travel to a SANS conference, I would feel some obligation to stay, It might even hurt you in the future. So you got your GCIH certification in Jan, 2017 and you left your last job in Feb 2017, yea, like I'm going to foot the bill for any of your training, at my company, NOT! You'll just leave again right after you cert up.
    Still searching for the corner in a round room.
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    TechGromitTechGromit Member Posts: 2,156 ■■■■■■■■■□
    3. If you are in security be prepared to NOT spend another minute with the company after they receive your notice. It is a very common practice to escort IT personnel out the minute they turn their notice in along with immediate account close outs and benefit cancelling.

    That didn't occur at the company I work at (for the guy I'm replacing), they even begged the guy to stay a few extra weeks. They were in the middle of a NRC cyber inspection, so they didn't want to lose a critical resource. A violation finding during an inspection could mean millions in fines, not to mention negative publicity. So the company had good reason to keep him around. The guy left for a startup, it could be the best career decision of his life, or worst. It's best not to burn any bridges when your new employer might not be in business in a year or two. :)
    Still searching for the corner in a round room.
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    victor.s.andreivictor.s.andrei Member Posts: 70 ■■■□□□□□□□
    Welly_59 wrote: »
    I know your right, I guess I'm just being a bit sentimental towards some good colleagues and management in my current role

    It's fine to feel loyal towards people. That said, the legal entity that is your employer is NOT a living, breathing human being...and that's who's employing you.
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    MalwareMikeMalwareMike Member Posts: 147 ■■■□□□□□□□
    I always feel guilty and/or awkward when leaving a company, even though I truly believe most companies are not loyal.
    Current: GSEC, GCIH, GCIA, GWAPT, GYPC, RHCSA, WCNA
    2019 Goals: CISSP, Splunk certifications (Certified Core, Power User, Admin, and Architect)
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    Z0sickxZ0sickx Member Posts: 180 ■■■□□□□□□□
    How do you guys approach leaving when they have 10k invested into and you sign a contract stating you will stay a year otherwise you front the bill. How common is it for other employers to pay off that bill on top of the salary you want?
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    EANxEANx Member Posts: 1,077 ■■■■■■■■□□
    Depends on the local market. Some companies will treat it as a hiring bonus so while you get the money to reimburse your former employer, it counts as income and thus must have taxes paid against it. If they want you bad enough, they'll pay. If the market favors the employer, you'll find it hard to find a company to do that.
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