How are you being impacted by COVID-19?

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  • E Double UE Double U Member Posts: 1,876 ■■■■■■■■■□
    Update: I have also been working 100% remote for a full calendar year now. Last month I started a new position at one of our subsidaries with a 15% pay increase. Only went to the office once to pick up my new laptop. No end in sight for this way of living/working. 
    Alphabet soup from (ISC)2, ISACA, GIAC, EC-Council, Microsoft, ITIL, Cisco, Scrum, and more.

    2021 goals: AZ-303, AZ-304, maybe TOGAF and more ISACA

    "You tried your best and you failed miserably. The lesson is, never try." - Homer Simpson
  • balancebalance Member Posts: 220 ■■■■■□□□□□
    edited March 24
    I  was terminated before the contract even started so  that is an entirely new experience for me.  Luckily I did not leave my prior position  right when the new company wanted me to or I would be SOL.  
  • Fulcrum45Fulcrum45 Member Posts: 619 ■■■■■□□□□□
    I've been using this time to introduce network upgrades in the office spaces that have been left mostly empty. I choose to be in 4 days a week but I could cut it back if I wanted to. Aside from the occasional VPN issue, I don't hear much from end users. 
  • JDMurrayJDMurray MSIT InfoSec, CISSP, SSCP, GSEC, EnCE, C|EH, CySA+, PenTest+, CASP+, Security+ Surf City, USAAdmin Posts: 12,204 Admin
    edited March 26
    All of the bathrooms and kitchen areas in our building were remodeled during the shutdown. I'm hoping they don't go to an Open Office floor plan where nobody has an assigned working space. I might as well stay 100% telework if that's the case.
  • november24november24 Member Posts: 76 ■■■■□□□□□□
    I've been impacted by COVID-19 in a different way, as a non English speaker my English language quality degraded since I don't use it often while I am at home.
  • TechGromitTechGromit GSEC, GCIH, GREM, Ontario, NY Member Posts: 2,029 ■■■■■■■■□□
    edited March 26
    Update: I typically go into the office 3 days a week, mon/wed/fri, other days remote but technically I only have to be onsite one day a week. I think only one person in our department takes it to that extreme. I occasionally have to go in more due to projects, I worked 4 days onsite this week, the Horror! The reentry for everyone to report to work every day was pushed back three times so far, the next target date is Sept. The girlfriend was remote several days a week for a few months, but now she has to report in every day for the most part. 
    Still searching for the corner in a round room.
  • DatabaseHeadDatabaseHead Teradata Assc 16, Querying Microsoft SQL Server 2012/2014, CSM Member Posts: 2,655 ■■■■■■■■■□
    edited March 26
    Update: I typically go into the office 3 days a week, mon/wed/fri, other days remote but technically I only have to be onsite one day a week. I think only one person in our department takes it to that extreme. I occasionally have to go in more due to projects, I worked 4 days onsite this week, the Horror! The reentry for everyone to report to work every day was pushed back three times so far, the next target date is Sept. The girlfriend was remote several days a week for a few months, but now she has to report in every day for the most part. 
    Interesting.  I work on a niche IT team as a SQL developer among other data task with dozens of pharmacist and they forecast the same time frame you mentioned, September.  According to them, that's when they believe it will be announced and then the transition will begin back with most everyone coming back to work 5 days a week.  

    They are actually considering removing remote from everyone (potentially) to build a strong team.  The research is showing remote workers are less productive and can get lazy over time.  

    I'm not sure I agree with that but I suppose it makes sense for some roles.  
  • TechGromitTechGromit GSEC, GCIH, GREM, Ontario, NY Member Posts: 2,029 ■■■■■■■■□□
    They are actually considering removing remote from everyone (potentially) to build a strong team.  The research is showing remote workers are less productive and can get lazy over time.  
    The company has been going more remote work for several years now, i can only see this speeding things up, but it does cause me some concern. If jobs are 100% remote, there no reason they can't have someone doing your job from Bangladesh for a fraction what your making. Why out sourcing doesn't always translate as well as some claim, mostly because way underqualified people are throw into positions they have no skill set for, not everyone is unqualified. 
    Still searching for the corner in a round room.
  • JDMurrayJDMurray MSIT InfoSec, CISSP, SSCP, GSEC, EnCE, C|EH, CySA+, PenTest+, CASP+, Security+ Surf City, USAAdmin Posts: 12,204 Admin
    If jobs are 100% remote, there no reason they can't have someone doing your job from Bangladesh for a fraction what your making.

    It depends on what field you are working in. For InfoSec and privacy, there is a lot of information that can't go beyond the borders of the US or EU, so locals are always required. The way more and more privacy regulations are being created the more localized/compartmentalized/controlled information will become.
  • Neil86Neil86 Member Member Posts: 175 ■■■■□□□□□□
    It's been about a year since I started working from home. I report to the office once a week, sometimes twice. All of our staff are WFH now with some administration staff reporting to the office throughout the week. After several surveys they've decided to keep it this way and have emptied several of our local and remote office buildings. It's a love/hate thing for me. With the reduction in travel, I save money on commuting costs. I've also been able to maintain my workout/nutrition routine much easier with the extra time saved and the convenience of being at home. On the days I do get to go into the office, I enjoy throwing on my chinos and a polo and being able to interact with some coworkers in person. It does require a lot of discipline and some of my friends still haven't realized it and are struggling. I decided to utilize the extra time and go back for my bachelors as well as work on some certs.
  • DatabaseHeadDatabaseHead Teradata Assc 16, Querying Microsoft SQL Server 2012/2014, CSM Member Posts: 2,655 ■■■■■■■■■□
    They are actually considering removing remote from everyone (potentially) to build a strong team.  The research is showing remote workers are less productive and can get lazy over time.  
    The company has been going more remote work for several years now, i can only see this speeding things up, but it does cause me some concern. If jobs are 100% remote, there no reason they can't have someone doing your job from Bangladesh for a fraction what your making. Why out sourcing doesn't always translate as well as some claim, mostly because way underqualified people are throw into positions they have no skill set for, not everyone is unqualified. 
    It's a great point you make.  I do think you'll see additional roles outsources due to this.  No remote field is without risk, even security, that's just being naive.  $$$ Will win out in the end, they generally do.  

    Of course, not all jobs will end up like this, just a %, how much is TBD.  That depends on the landscape and laws.  Job security, being highly competent, and indispensable (as much as reasonably possible) will be critical in the future.   As I begin to age out in my career field I am embarking on a new career mindset.  Stay in the dang job and continue to grow upward internally.  

  • Johnhe0414Johnhe0414 A+, Network+, Security+, Project+ USA, CARegistered Users Posts: 163 ■■■■□□□□□□
    As we come to the last day of the month of March (2021) which marks a year i have been telecommuting, it appears that we may be going back to the office in late April. Working will be different as we are looking at ways to continue working from home and the office. Currently looking at office map applications that assists with interactive floor plans, office/desk bookings or hoteling etc. It will be very interesting when we go back to work.
    Current:  A+ | Network+ | Project+ |Security+
    Working on: Cysa+
  • beadsbeads Senior Member Member Posts: 1,520 ■■■■■■■■■□
    Working from home for more than, what 15 months now. I have mellowed abit on WFH as my virtual team is now offshore, save myself. Biggest difficult I see is that I am now on call 7/24/365 having been on calls at both 2-4AM as well as those scheduled Saturday and Sunday morning meetings to "catch up". Covid hit both the client and the consultants hard. Very hard.

    There is good and bad to it. I now prefer to WFH rather than being in the client's "open concept" office where we are stuck together, elbow to elbow, at 20 person desks.
  • DZA_DZA_ Untitled. Member Posts: 440 ■■■■■■□□□□
    Update: Like most of you, I've been working from home past the 1 year mark. Work has been steady but at the beginning it was pure chaos when it came to workload. In this one year period, I'll be moving two times - once in last August and now this upcoming June. All I can say is that there is definitely no shortage in work for my team even with a slimmer budget for this and next fiscal year. Work remains to be remote until decided otherwise but the team has decided to meet once a week on a Friday once the new office has been built in the downtown core.  Stay safe and well everyone.


  • Mike7Mike7 Member Posts: 1,094 ■■■■□□□□□□
    edited April 6
    Working from home since Feb last year including a job (and domain) change to new company in November. It was a unique experience as all interactions including interviews, onboarding and meetings were conducted online. Current company even shipped work laptop to my home, and I only met my new colleagues and managers in person early this year. 

    I think I worked longer and more productive from home, but do try to go office at least twice a week for the social interaction. With the rest of the economy badly affected by the pandemic,  I consider myself lucky. 

    Really hope that covid is over. Stay safe and stay strong everyone. 



  • LordQarlynLordQarlyn Member Posts: 676 ■■■■■■□□□□
    If jobs are 100% remote, there no reason they can't have someone doing your job from Bangladesh for a fraction what your making.
    Interesting point. There are indeed some countries trying to attract 100% remote workers to move there, not for pay decreases but presumably so their economies can benefit from the remote jobs. Realistically, unless you meet some very limited criteria, there's not much benefit to relocating to another country just for the heck of it.

  • TechGromitTechGromit GSEC, GCIH, GREM, Ontario, NY Member Posts: 2,029 ■■■■■■■■□□
    If jobs are 100% remote, there no reason they can't have someone doing your job from Bangladesh for a fraction what your making.
    Interesting point. There are indeed some countries trying to attract 100% remote workers to move there, not for pay decreases but presumably so their economies can benefit from the remote jobs. Realistically, unless you meet some very limited criteria, there's not much benefit to relocating to another country just for the heck of it.

    True, but it's causing a lot of people to re-examine there choices in where they live in the county.  If you can telecommute to work in New York City where the COL of 187.2, than why not move to say Rochester, NY where the COL index is 78.4. You will effective more than double how far your dollar goes, without major chances in life style. Rochester has a lot of the same amenities as NYC, without the higher cost. Sure you can also move to tumbleweed Mexico, population 500 to minimize your COL, but you'll also have major life style chances as well. 
    Still searching for the corner in a round room.
  • JDMurrayJDMurray MSIT InfoSec, CISSP, SSCP, GSEC, EnCE, C|EH, CySA+, PenTest+, CASP+, Security+ Surf City, USAAdmin Posts: 12,204 Admin
    If you can telecommute to work in New York City where the COL of 187.2, than why not move to say Rochester, NY where the COL index is 78.4. You will effective more than double how far your dollar goes, without major chances in life style.

    In this scenario, my employer would pay me as if I worked in Rochester and not in NYC. Most employers are smarter than that.
  • TechGromitTechGromit GSEC, GCIH, GREM, Ontario, NY Member Posts: 2,029 ■■■■■■■■□□
    JDMurray said:
    If you can telecommute to work in New York City where the COL of 187.2, than why not move to say Rochester, NY where the COL index is 78.4. You will effective more than double how far your dollar goes, without major chances in life style.

    In this scenario, my employer would pay me as if I worked in Rochester and not in NYC. Most employers are smarter than that.
    This hasn't been my experience. I transferred from a Higher COL area to a lower one and got a raise to boot.  This might be true if this was a new employer you go hired at in Rochester, but no employers is going to say, oh I see on your personal file you moved from NYC to Pakistan, I'm afraid we are going have to cut your salary 80% based on the COL index and pay you in Rupee's for now on.  
    Still searching for the corner in a round room.
  • JDMurrayJDMurray MSIT InfoSec, CISSP, SSCP, GSEC, EnCE, C|EH, CySA+, PenTest+, CASP+, Security+ Surf City, USAAdmin Posts: 12,204 Admin
    A US job requiring you to move to Pakistan would get you an 80% increase plus hazard pay. ;)
  • LordQarlynLordQarlyn Member Posts: 676 ■■■■■■□□□□
    True, but it's causing a lot of people to re-examine there choices in where they live in the county.  If you can telecommute to work in New York City where the COL of 187.2, than why not move to say Rochester, NY where the COL index is 78.4. You will effective more than double how far your dollar goes, without major chances in life style. Rochester has a lot of the same amenities as NYC, without the higher cost. Sure you can also move to tumbleweed Mexico, population 500 to minimize your COL, but you'll also have major life style chances as well. 
    Well, I was specifically talking about international moves. I wouldn't recommend Pakistan, but, you could in theory move to Thailand or Philippines and have a good quality of life for much less COL. Though I am not sure if those countries allow remote workers resident visas and there may be taxation issues as well. UAE is eager to get remote workers to move there and has a visa, but can be expensive to live in the UAE and one's employer is probably not likely to offer any expat benefits to offset the cost.

  • balancebalance Member Posts: 220 ■■■■■□□□□□
    I just took a level one help desk position because my current position  will end quickly . Oddly enough I make about the same. 
  • JDMurrayJDMurray MSIT InfoSec, CISSP, SSCP, GSEC, EnCE, C|EH, CySA+, PenTest+, CASP+, Security+ Surf City, USAAdmin Posts: 12,204 Admin
    I wouldn't recommend Pakistan, but, you could in theory move to Thailand or Philippines and have a good quality of life for much less COL.


    Yes, I have known people who have done this with remote (i.e., non-geographically-specific) work, such as pentesting, bug bounty, and software development. My one acquaintance who moved to Thailand--where he lived for about US$25K/year--moved back to the US after a year because the US is "much cleaner and you can actually get things that you need here." The bit of wisdom I realized was anyone that is thinking of relocating somewhere radically different should make an extended visit to that place first to understand first-hand what day-to-day life there is really like.

  • LordQarlynLordQarlyn Member Posts: 676 ■■■■■■□□□□
    JDMurray said:
    Yes, I have known people who have done this with remote (i.e., non-geographically-specific) work, such as pentesting, bug bounty, and software development. My one acquaintance who moved to Thailand--where he lived for about US$25K/year--moved back to the US after a year because the US is "much cleaner and you can actually get things that you need here." The bit of wisdom I realized was anyone that is thinking of relocating somewhere radically different should make an extended visit to that place first to understand first-hand what day-to-day life there is really like.
    Man you are spot on with this. Myself, I am fine, I have lived over half my life outside the United States, I adjust, I adapt, I learn to use what's available. But I've come across plenty of my fellow Americans, who should have never left. It's a big adjustment and not everyone is cut out for it, and you know what, that's okay. Leaving one's country is not for everyone. For those it is, it can be fun and a truly great experience.
  • E Double UE Double U Member Posts: 1,876 ■■■■■■■■■□
    Agreed @JDMurray and @LordQarlyn

    I am a California native that has been living in The Netherlands for five years now and I visited NL every year since 2007 before permantly relocating in 2016. Having a wife that is a NL native helped. One amazing trip to Amsterdam wasn't enough to sell me on the move. I really got a chance to see day-to-day real life for several years which helped with the decision. Even with the "safe landing" I had thanks to my wife's family/friends plus a job waiting for me, it is still a huge adjustment. I know others that have relocated without the support system and this pandemic period has been very difficult for them. Expat life is definitely not for everyone. 
    Alphabet soup from (ISC)2, ISACA, GIAC, EC-Council, Microsoft, ITIL, Cisco, Scrum, and more.

    2021 goals: AZ-303, AZ-304, maybe TOGAF and more ISACA

    "You tried your best and you failed miserably. The lesson is, never try." - Homer Simpson
  • TechGromitTechGromit GSEC, GCIH, GREM, Ontario, NY Member Posts: 2,029 ■■■■■■■■□□
    JDMurray said:
    A US job requiring you to move to Pakistan would get you an 80% increase plus hazard pay. ;)
    LOL. I only specifically picked Pakistan because it has the lowest cost of living in the world, but my point still stands, moving shouldn't result in a drastic cut in salary if working remote. 
    Still searching for the corner in a round room.
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