Email Signature Block

Does anyone place there degree and/or certifications after their name in their signature block at work? Or do you just have your name and title? I always kept my degree and certs after my name at my last job, but it was needed due to the type of people I had to communicate with, but I am unsure if I will do it with my new job. Thanks!

Famos
B.S.B.A. (Management Information Systems)
M.B.A. (Technology Management)
«1

Comments

  • Ricka182Ricka182 Member Posts: 3,359
    I only have my name, company, and the two extensions I can be reached at. I see no need to advertise education and certifications, unless they were high level such as CCIE, CISSP, etc...
    i remain, he who remains to be....
  • famosbrownfamosbrown Member Posts: 637
    Only high level? Why post a CCIE, but not a MCSE? I know some certs are higher than others, but why post some, but not all? I see many signatures with B.A. or M.A. or M.B.A, with MCSE, A+, etc. after the name.
    B.S.B.A. (Management Information Systems)
    M.B.A. (Technology Management)
  • Ricka182Ricka182 Member Posts: 3,359
    MCSE is no where near CCIE......simply put, you can't **** your way to CCIE, and it doesn't garner as much respect. I'm not saying it shouldn't be done, I've just never seen it like that, at least not in an email signature......
    i remain, he who remains to be....
  • int80hint80h Member Posts: 84 ■■□□□□□□□□
    There are only 2 achivements that should be placed in an email signatue:

    1. PhDs
    2. professional licenses

    Anything else is considered unprofessional.
  • SlowhandSlowhand MCSE: Cloud Platform and Infrastructure, MCSA: Windows Server 2003/2012/2016, CCNA Routing & Switchi Bay Area, CaliforniaMod Posts: 5,161 Mod
    I suppose it would depend on the context. Normally, I really only see people with a PhD or a Master's put down their degrees as part of their business cards or email signatures. As for certifications, I'd put down noteworthy certifications if it's a business address. As for which certs? I think it's a little narrow to say "one is better than another". If you're a windows administrator and you work for a large company, it wouldn't be out of place to have MCSE listed for inter-office email or for your official company address. If you're a Cisco admin, then put down what you are, CCNA/CCNP/CCIE, whatever. Same goes for RHCE, LPIC, A+, Net+, and anything else: if it's appropriate for your job role, then it goes either on your business card or on your email footer. (And if it's not your job role and you're putting it on your email to brag, then you have no business corresponding with the pros, anyway.)

    Free Microsoft Training: Microsoft Learn
    Free PowerShell Resources: Top PowerShell Blogs
    Free DevOps/Azure Resources: Visual Studio Dev Essentials

    Let it never be said that I didn't do the very least I could do.
  • famosbrownfamosbrown Member Posts: 637
    Slowhand wrote:
    I suppose it would depend on the context. Normally, I really only see people with a PhD or a Master's put down their degrees as part of their business cards or email signatures. As for certifications, I'd put down noteworthy certifications if it's a business address. As for which certs? I think it's a little narrow to say "one is better than another". If you're a windows administrator and you work for a large company, it wouldn't be out of place to have MCSE listed for inter-office email or for your official company address. If you're a Cisco admin, then put down what you are, CCNA/CCNP/CCIE, whatever. Same goes for RHCE, LPIC, A+, Net+, and anything else: if it's appropriate for your job role, then it goes either on your business card or on your email footer. (And if it's not your job role and you're putting it on your email to brag, then you have no business corresponding with the pros, anyway.)

    I agree...if you are an accounting technician processing pay or something, why place I.T. certifications in your signature when emailing? I've also spoke with some I.T. professionals about it locally and they said that it all depends on your job. If you are using the certification or degree in your job, then do it. They also stated that there are many who look down upon it because they might not have the certifications or degree to show in their signatures, or the level of certification or education isn't as high as others.

    I think it would cause jealousy or envy amongst a team if people think that way. It would definitely be bad if your peers think that you are doing it because you think you are better than others or something like that (management/team building classes icon_smile.gif ). Those who work hard to attain their education and certification should be proud and display what they have accomplished...especially when it correlates to their job. I've even seen some signatures where it had all of the icons fromt he various certifications as well.

    I am just wondering if those here in the community forum who do have many certifications/degrees, actually work in the field where you are communicationg with many outside I.T. vendors and companies through email, and have a big role in the I.T. Deapartment overall, place their professional certifications and education in their signature (work).
    B.S.B.A. (Management Information Systems)
    M.B.A. (Technology Management)
  • Orion82698Orion82698 Member Posts: 483
    I don't see the need to put certs in the sig either. I know a few a work who do this, and they're morons. The ones who do have their MCSE/CCNA and such and don't use their sig for promoting what they've achived are the smart ones.

    Now, don't take this as me saying if you use them in your sig you're a moron, I'm just going off what I've seen.

    Just my 2 cents :D
    WIP Vacation ;-)

    Porsche..... there is no substitute!
  • TechJunkyTechJunky Member Posts: 881
    I am going to take sides with Orion on this one. Well put.
  • xlg123xlg123 Member Posts: 34 ■■□□□□□□□□
    I'm a little diffeent working for a law enforcement agnecy, the only cert I put is CFCE (Certified Forensic Computer Examiner) along with my agency name and title. The only time I list my certs and education is on the actual reports, at the end. There is another CFCE (works for the state) that has all his certs and various postions held as part of his regualr e mail sig. I always roll my eyes when I see it. Of course, he's god's gift to forensics. Just ask him, he'll tell you. And to twice as annoying he spells out each one, line by line. I like getting the emails that have a two line message and nine line signature block from him.
  • famosbrownfamosbrown Member Posts: 637
    Okay...so far I am hearing from people who don't hold a MCSA or higher or a degree saying that they don't like. It seems to be the same people. I've also heard from a person who is MCSA, Linux+, LPIC, CFCE, etc. who said it is alright depending on your job. I would like to hear from some who actually have many of the premier certs or degrees that work in the field. So far what I've gathered locally from I.T. professionals/workers are the same here in the fourm. Those who have and use them at work, don't have the problem. Those who don't, do. I'm not saying that those who don't have all of the beyond entry level certs or degrees are jealous or anything, but I'm saying that the answers have been the same!! This is interesting!
    B.S.B.A. (Management Information Systems)
    M.B.A. (Technology Management)
  • bmaurobmauro Member Posts: 307
    We have several engineers here with their CCNP or MCSE and a few CISSP here as well. No one puts down there certs.

    The only people I see placing their certs are new hires on the HelpDesk that place their MCP in their titles - it IMO looks stupid as hell. Even then - after awhile they tend to remove the "MCP Professional" from their title :P
  • TrailerisfTrailerisf Member Posts: 455
    I have seen a few people with MCSE in their sig. Looks fine to me. I use the job title of Systems Engineer, but I haven't posted a MCSE cert in my name. But I really wouldn't care if anyone else did. Gives you a idea on the training someone has on the other end. But I wouldn't be advertising bottom certs like Net+ or A+ or CCNA. Something like a CCNP, MCSE, CISSP, CCIE... Things that pertain to your job, and limit it to one.

    Gee Ricka, I wish I spoke to you before I wasted all my time cheating my way to a MCSE...I guess I'll **** my way on up to a CCIE now. [/end sarcasm]
    On the road to Cisco. Will I hunt it, or will it hunt me?
  • bmaurobmauro Member Posts: 307
    In all fairness...

    "But I wouldn't be advertising bottom certs like Net+ or A+ or CCNA"

    CCNA = bottom cert?

    icon_rolleyes.gif

    Seems to be lots of MCSA/MCSE vs. CCNA this week.
  • TechJunkyTechJunky Member Posts: 881
    I think what is meant by bottom level certification is entry level cert for that field.

    IE: A+ = Entry level Hardware, N+ = Entry Level Network, MCP = Entry Level Microsoft, CCNA = Entry Level Cisco
  • SmallguySmallguy Member Posts: 597
    I don't put it in my signature because I think there is no need for it

    you have the knowledge and you perform your job the only peopel who need to know your qualifacations are your manager and HR IMO.

    I've seen people put BA after their name....and it looks pretencious to me

    now if your an independent consultant it's different because people might be looking at what certs you have to guage your abilitites but in a tradition al office setting I see no need,
  • MunckMunck Member Posts: 150
    I agree with Orion and others. You have to be very careful with e-mail signatures. A Master or PhD is alright by me, but certs look unprofessional.
  • keenonkeenon Member Posts: 1,922 ■■■■□□□□□□
    i put mine at the bottom after my name , then following the company stuff icon_wink.gif

    N+, CCNA, CCNP and then the sig at the bottom
    Become the stainless steel sharp knife in a drawer full of rusty spoons
  • SlowhandSlowhand MCSE: Cloud Platform and Infrastructure, MCSA: Windows Server 2003/2012/2016, CCNA Routing & Switchi Bay Area, CaliforniaMod Posts: 5,161 Mod
    As I said in my earlier post, it all depends on what's appropriate for your situation. In most cases, you don't really need to put anything after your name, aside from your company and your job title. On the other hand, if you work for a large company and the upper-management decides your fate based solely on how valuable you are perceived to be, it might not be a bad idea to make sure that, if you're the Windows admin or you're the Cisco engineer, you make sure that those countless people who may be deciding if you get to keep your job or not at the next HR meeting see "CCNA/CCNP/CCIE. . . MCSA/MCSE. . . RHCE/LPIC-1/LPIC-2. . . etc. . ." after your name.

    Then again, if it doesn't matter if you're a PhD with a CCIE and you invented the internet, then you just need the basics on your signature: name, contact info, job title. Pick what's needed and/or appropriate for your situation. No more, no less.

    Free Microsoft Training: Microsoft Learn
    Free PowerShell Resources: Top PowerShell Blogs
    Free DevOps/Azure Resources: Visual Studio Dev Essentials

    Let it never be said that I didn't do the very least I could do.
  • endersftdendersftd Member Posts: 61 ■■□□□□□□□□
    Here's my experience with certs in sigs: I work as the IT manager for a local health department. I have a lot of free reign to do work on my own, but since we're still part of the state government and the state's network, lots of times I have to contact networking people at the state's capital to ask for assistance. Aside from mentioning my job title, I put (in small font) my certifications. This is useful for me because the technicians I talk to can see that I'm not just a user asking a common, everyday question.
    "We will rule over all this land, and we will call it...'This Land.'"
  • SlowhandSlowhand MCSE: Cloud Platform and Infrastructure, MCSA: Windows Server 2003/2012/2016, CCNA Routing & Switchi Bay Area, CaliforniaMod Posts: 5,161 Mod
    endersftd wrote:
    Here's my experience with certs in sigs: I work as the IT manager for a local health department. I have a lot of free reign to do work on my own, but since we're still part of the state government and the state's network, lots of times I have to contact networking people at the state's capital to ask for assistance. Aside from mentioning my job title, I put (in small font) my certifications. This is useful for me because the technicians I talk to can see that I'm not just a user asking a common, everyday question.

    There you go. I think this is a good example of putting those certs to work in the way they were created for: displaying that you have a particular level of knowledge in a particular area. Thank you for the input, endersftd.

    Free Microsoft Training: Microsoft Learn
    Free PowerShell Resources: Top PowerShell Blogs
    Free DevOps/Azure Resources: Visual Studio Dev Essentials

    Let it never be said that I didn't do the very least I could do.
  • garv221garv221 Member Posts: 1,914
    Name
    Title
    Company
    Office phone
    **sometimes fax**

    Attorneys can get away with putting ESQ after their name and Doctors with MD. CCIE could slide but in my opinion anything else is over kill and unprofessional.
  • sprkymrksprkymrk Member Posts: 4,884 ■■■□□□□□□□
    Slowhand wrote:
    and you invented the internet, then you just need the basics on your signature: name, contact info, job title.

    Why bring Al Gore into this? icon_lol.gif
    All things are possible, only believe.
  • famosbrownfamosbrown Member Posts: 637
    Wow...this thread has grown :) !! Seems to be the same opinions though...those with certs over MCP and A+, seem to be doing it since they are actually using what they have learned and attained thorugh certification in their job everyday. I'm waiting for someone with CCIE, MCSE, CCNP, B.S., etc come to the thread and say that they don't...hopefully noone tries to create an account and place a bunch of fake certs in their profile and post though icon_eek.gif .

    Thanks for all of the replies!! It's nice to see a broad base of opinions on a stupid subject such as this icon_lol.gif .
    B.S.B.A. (Management Information Systems)
    M.B.A. (Technology Management)
  • garv221garv221 Member Posts: 1,914
    I thought about this a little more...

    Truly the only thing that should be added to a signature is something that had to be obtained to hold that current position which would make clients outside of their office aware that they are capable of certain work. IE ~ esq, MD, CPA.....Nothing in IT fills that requirment, not a BA, MCSE, CISSP or even CCIE. We can do the work without the certs. A lawyer is not a lawyer without passing the bar and a name followed by esq is a dead giveway the person passed the bar, same with MD and CPA. If someone must put a BA or MCSE in their signature use the font "Goudy Stout", BOLD with size 24 and hot pink color. You can even put a big MCSE logo..totaly your choice on the logo though. icon_lol.gif
  • famosbrownfamosbrown Member Posts: 637
    garv221 wrote:
    I thought about this a little more...

    Truly the only thing that should be added to a signature is something that had to be obtained to hold that current position which would make clients outside of their office aware that they are capable of certain work. IE ~ esq, MD, CPA.....Nothing in IT fills that requirment, not a BA, MCSE, CISSP or even CCIE. We can do the work without the certs. A lawyer is not a lawyer without passing the bar and a name followed by esq is a dead giveway the person passed the bar, same with MD and CPA. If someone must put a BA or MCSE in their signature use the font "Goudy Stout", BOLD with size 24 and hot pink color. You can even put a big MCSE logo..totaly your choice on the logo though. icon_lol.gif

    Well...there are many users at my last job who holds a CPA that didn't place it in their signatures. Some did, some didn't. What do you mean by something that had to be attained to currently hold that position? Are you implying that a person can't do CPA work without being a CPA?? I can honestly say from personal experience, that people work in a CPA position doing CPA work, while they are studying or trying to achieve CPA status. same goes for LPN, RN, etc. You also stated that titles make those outside of the office aware that they can do the work. Why would I think someone who is just an MCSE can setup my entire Cisco Infrastructure? Why would I think someone with a CCIE can setup my entire MS Windows Infrastructure? Without the title, why do I assume a person with the title Systems Engineer can really do the job??

    I do agree...jobs can be done without the certifications, but it isn't limited to I.T. There are many people who can do the job just as good without certifications or degrees (i.e. accountants, teachers, nurses, etc.) than those with the certifications and degrees that are mostly required to get or do the job correctly.

    If I.T. certification isn't required to do the job, why try to attain them? Why are employers filtering job selections based on them? Why are they required and demanded so much from the I.T. industry? Why do they even exist?
    B.S.B.A. (Management Information Systems)
    M.B.A. (Technology Management)
  • sprkymrksprkymrk Member Posts: 4,884 ■■■□□□□□□□
    Personal preference is all it is.

    sprkymrk
    TechExams Mod+
    Certified Tech Exams Grunt

    icon_lol.gificon_lol.gif
    All things are possible, only believe.
  • WebmasterWebmaster Admin Posts: 10,292 Admin
    Does anyone place there degree and/or certifications after their name in their signature block at work?
    I agree with Garv's first reply. Just your name, job title and contact info. It really is the most common email signature in professional email. But there are exceptions imo. I.e. if I'd be a contracter and a CCIE and I'd be at work and emailing with a headhunter or someone else I may want to do work for in the future, I'd include the CCIE for sure. Including the number icon_lol.gif So imo you should not include your certs, unless you think it can benifit you. (to get a new job for example, and when you get that job, you can stop including your certs again).
  • royalroyal Member Posts: 3,352 ■■■■□□□□□□
    I don't have any of my certs in my e-mail. I don't care to do it but I don't mind the people who actually do it. One of the guys at work is a very nice guy, extremely helpful, and very good at his job. He has his MCSE listed. One of the new guys has his MCSA like me and he has MCSA listed as well as the MCSA logo in his e-mail. I think that's pretty ridiculous.

    My e-mail signature

    Name
    Company
    Company Address
    Phone
    Company logo
    “For success, attitude is equally as important as ability.” - Harry F. Banks
  • garv221garv221 Member Posts: 1,914
    I agree Johan.

    Famous- You got a little carried away and off topic. Let me reel you back in. What I mean is those positions are obtained status. The business world refers to people by job titles. People put job titles in their signature, some people need to validate their job title because they have certain prerequisites that must be obtained to professionaly and legaly do the work ie ~ esq, cpa and md. An attorney cannot go to court w/out the bar, Accountant cannot legally process certain taxes without a CPA and one must go through med school and obtain an MD. You, me and every person in IT knows we do not have to pass exam or prerequisite to work on systems/networks. It is the root of all the heated certs vs. school vs experience arguments. Have agood weekend.
Sign In or Register to comment.