Moving from support to oracle/unix dba. Need some advice

KaminskyKaminsky Member Posts: 1,235
I've been working in support for almost 15 years and been studying recently for ccna (getting close too) I've been finding support growing a little old and though I am studying for ccna to try and improve my lot and possibly move into networking, I have been offered a job as a dba. This is not mainly due to my support experience but primarily the environment I have always worked in and the types of users I have always supported.

This is going to be oracle over aix unix supporting a massive user base. Though I have unix and a bit of dba/sql from my uni days, they are going to train me right up in both for several solid months so I am going to get right in there.

My question is:
In my previous support experience I have suffered from not certifying as I go and I do not want to make the same mistake again. I have no idea what certs I should be aiming for as I go. I know oracle do their own certs but I am not sure that being limited to oracle/aix would be advantagous should I find myself on the street in a few years looking for work. (although typing in oracle into a job search engine did get it very excited and some nice numbers were popping up)

So what sort of certification paths should I be aiming for in this great experience and training I am about to get? I have no longing to come back to support. I've paid my dues there. Also, it seems to be closely linked to developer, mainly web front ends, so what are the key programming languages for this sort of thing? I also have a lot of programming from uni but once I hit support, that all ended but it's mostly like riding a bike once you've had that level of formal training. It's only the syntax that changes from language to language.

Any help gratefully received.
Kam.

Comments

  • bighornsheepbighornsheep Member Posts: 1,506
    Hey, first of all, I'm by no means an expert with database administration nor network systems, but I'll give you a little bit about what I do know.

    I'm surprised that it's an oracle environment on AIX, do you know if it's the application server or the database server of oracle that they're using? Because of it is AIX, I would almost assume it's going to be DB2, anyway...

    I'm currently working as an entry data analyst, mostly SQL and scripting work, our environment is a mix of SQL server, and oracle 10g. My manager has been talking about OCA and OCP, and I think it's a good start for database work, I have friends that work at IBM working with DB2, and they tell me that it's also a good cert to go for even if the environment isnt DB2 because of the amount of foundations that the prep work lays.

    Cheers~
    Jack of all trades, master of none
  • mikej412mikej412 Member Posts: 10,090
    Congratulations! But don't let it get in your the way of getting your CCNA!
    I'm surprised that it's an oracle environment on AIX, do you know if it's the application server or the database server of oracle that they're using? Because of it is AIX, I would almost assume it's going to be DB2, anyway...
    I would have posted first.... but I keep looping and doing a "hard reset" thinking Oracle/AIX??? Oracle/AIX??? Oracle/AIX??? Thanks bighornsheep for "breaking the loop!" icon_lol.gif

    Oracle on AIX is like WebSphere on Solaris! icon_lol.gif

    Try the Oracle Technology Network page and then checkout the links along the top. The Getting Started menu option has the link to the DBA Getting Started page. After your CCNA, you may want to hang out there.

    Check out the Oracle Downloads -- you can get a free account and grab FREE STUFF! :D
    All software downloads are free, and each comes with a Development License that allows you to use full versions of the products only while developing and prototyping your applications. You can buy products with full-use licenses at any time from the online Store or from your sales representative.
    
    Oracle likes giving their stuff away to people who want to develop stuff with their software..... I'm guessing they won't be mad if you just load it to learn how to administer it. Just in case -- brush up on your old programming skill with the software and attempt to develop something -- and you should be legal.

    The Certification Link is buried along the left edge of the OTN pages... and takes you to the The Oracle Certification Page. You can use the drop down to see and selects the paths.... or use the Certification Path link on the left edge to go here. Just like Cisco, you start with the Associate level (OCA) and then the Professional level (OCP). Oracle then has their Master level -- which I think required attending a class. It may have changed (hopefully) since I started working on my Cisco Certifications. Cisco, RedHat, and Juniper with their "hands on lab exams" pushed Oracle Certification down on my "certification list" -- but Oracle is in my "top 5."

    Exam info, FAQs, etc. should be options along the left edge under the expanded Certification section.


    While Oracle isn't DB2... its still good to know, as your job board lookup showed. icon_lol.gif

    Consider the AIX Certifications... if you can figure out which is which. They changed the Certification names and levels a few years back and I find them confusing. And I think that @Server logo is stupid (and I have an @diot wallpaper on 1 laptop and 1 server to prove it). And I can never remember that RS6000s are now the P-Series... and I have no clue what the AS400s are.... and I'm still pissed off at IBM Marketing for those stupid name changes!

    IBM also has had the trial/free DB2 downloads and free training stuff available in the past. Not sure what's there now, but after you do Certify on Oracle and AIX, then also consider DB2. IBM has the Redbooks available -- so check out the AIX ones (and sneak a peak at the DB2 offerings).

    From there, if you like that DBA thing -- then think about the Linux Certifications (Linux+ or even better, the LPIs). Then after your CCNP, consider the MCSE and MCDBA. And while Solaris isn't AIX.... you might consider that some day.
    :mike: Cisco Certifications -- Collect the Entire Set!
  • KaminskyKaminsky Member Posts: 1,235
    Thanks guys and thanks Mike for those links. Great starting point.

    I've no idea why it's Oracle over AIX Unix. Why is that a bad thing exactly ?

    Looking at the dba cert there is a hands on requirement which must be instructor led. How is that policed? Do you have to go to Oracle for a workshop as a requirement for the certification ?
    Kam.
  • bighornsheepbighornsheep Member Posts: 1,506
    Kaminsky wrote:
    I've no idea why it's Oracle over AIX Unix. Why is that a bad thing exactly ?

    Looking at the dba cert there is a hands on requirement which must be instructor led. How is that policed? Do you have to go to Oracle for a workshop as a requirement for the certification ?

    Probably not a bad thing, I just find it weird, no particular reason why it's abnormal, I've just personally not seen such a combination, but then again, I probably havent seen half of what the database industry is like yet, so I could be wrong. My understanding was that, Oracle is huge in the Windows market, and if any distribution of *nix is used, postgreSql seems to be the typical choice unless it's Db2.

    Where do you see that there's requirements for instructor led training? http://education.oracle.com/pls/web_prod-plq-dad/db_pages.getpage?page_id=41&p_org_id=1001&lang=US&p_exam_id=1Z0_042

    For the basic OCA exam, it shows no requirements, but it did mention a recommended workshop.

    Good luck~
    Jack of all trades, master of none
  • KaminskyKaminsky Member Posts: 1,235
    Where do you see that there's requirements for instructor led training?

    Ahh it may have only been for the OCP http://education.oracle.com/pls/web_prod-plq-dad/db_pages.getpage?page_id=99
    so I assumed it was for the Associate as well.
    Kam.
Sign In or Register to comment.