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ParmenidesParmenides Member Posts: 17 ■□□□□□□□□□
Hey, I just have some questions. I'm looking to begin the IT career experience. So, I'm looking at entry level work to get in. 5 years ago I received a Bachelor's in Math: computer science, which is like a hybrid math computer degree (18 credit hours in computer courses).

After much deliberation, I'm about 95% sure I want to go the networking route. With no IT job experience and a 5 year old degree, what do you think is the best route for me to take? Regardless, of where I go, I know I have plenty of reading to do.

Since I have no experience, I probably need a slightly indirect route towards networking.
Is it wisest to get the A+ cert, then start looking for a helpdesk position? Would network+ and an MCP be the next step to get my foot in the door (and/or to get my feet wet) or should I skip it all and try the CCNA? I took one class in networking in College.

How important is the A+ in my position? Would I be having a hard time getting my foot in the door if I bypass the non-networking specific certs?

Comments

  • blargoeblargoe Self-Described Huguenot NC, USAMember Posts: 4,172 ■■■■■■■■■□
    If it were me:

    I would for for some FORMAL training - probably classes at your local CC in line with their AAS in networking or computer systems or what have you would be cheapest. I would start out with A+ or MCP and go from there. Definately start taking some beginning network classes too.

    I actually hold a similar degree (though more CS concentrated, still programming oriented), and supplemented my work with a CCNA course when I realized I didn't want to be a programmer, this helped me land my first job as an intern with a local computer consulting shop that developed into a full time job. I'm not saying jump into the CCNA right now (I think I am an exception to the rule) , the point is supplemental training will be of help.

    I would go ahead and get some IT work experience now if you can. You could get a call center type of job right away probably, whatever it is, at this point all you care about is getting experience on paper. What line of work have you been in for the past 5 years, if any?
    IT guy since 12/00

    Recent: 11/2019 - RHCSA (RHEL 7); 2/2019 - Updated VCP to 6.5 (just a few days before VMware discontinued the re-cert policy...)
    Working on: RHCE/Ansible
    Future: Probably continued Red Hat Immersion, Possibly VCAP Design, or maybe a completely different path. Depends on job demands...
  • royalroyal Member Posts: 3,353
    What I did to get started was take a class for A+. I then read a couple books after I took the class and then passed. I then decided to continue on and do my Network+ on my own. After that, I got a job doing basic Windows administration learning AD. I then was laid off because I didn't know enough because my company thought they'd have time to train me but they were losing money due to poor money management. I ended up going back to college, got my BS degree, and now have an awesome job I love very much and will probably stay at for years to come.

    Short story, don't give up. Get a couple of certifications, A+ and Network+ is what I always recommend, and keep looking for basic Windows administration/help desk jobs that will help you get some experience. During that time while you're building up some experience, try to study for your MCSA. It'll help show you have inspiration to excel in your career.
    “For success, attitude is equally as important as ability.” - Harry F. Banks
  • ParmenidesParmenides Member Posts: 17 ■□□□□□□□□□
    Thanks!

    I started out substitute teaching then I moved on to teach math and science at a small private school.

    If you don't mind me asking, is formal classroom learning all that important or can self-study be potentially just as good?

    It sounds like the Microsoft Certs are still very important even to someone aiming for networking.
  • royalroyal Member Posts: 3,353
    Everything since A+ I have self-studied. I would only recommend formal training for someone who is just starting into the IT field and needs a jump start. If you feel you can self-study A+, I'd say go for it.
    “For success, attitude is equally as important as ability.” - Harry F. Banks
  • blargoeblargoe Self-Described Huguenot NC, USAMember Posts: 4,172 ■■■■■■■■■□
    Depends on the person really. If you go the self study route, make sure you invest in some equipment to that you can do some hands on training, it will help you get a better grasp on things.
    IT guy since 12/00

    Recent: 11/2019 - RHCSA (RHEL 7); 2/2019 - Updated VCP to 6.5 (just a few days before VMware discontinued the re-cert policy...)
    Working on: RHCE/Ansible
    Future: Probably continued Red Hat Immersion, Possibly VCAP Design, or maybe a completely different path. Depends on job demands...
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